Lhatese

Home > Dog Breeds > Lhatese
10-15 lbs
8-10"
United States
Lhasa Apso
Maltese
Lhasatese, Lamalese
The Lhatese is a hybrid dog. He is a mixture of the Lhasa Apso and the Maltese. He is a very sweet breed, but he may be somewhat difficult to train. He loves his family, including children of all ages. He is better suited to experienced dog owners. He will enjoy spending time with you and the rest of his human family. He is a small dog; at maturity, he will weigh no more than fifteen pounds. They get along with just about anyone, including other dogs. He does not suffer excessively from separation anxiety; however, he wants to spend every waking moment with you.
Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Lhasa Apso, Maltese

Lhatese Health

Average Size
Male Lhatese size stats
Height: 10-12 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Female Lhatese size stats
Height: 8-10 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Eye Problems
  • Kidney Problems
  • Reverse Sneezing
  • Collapsed Trachea
Minor Concerns
  • Skin Disorders
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Dental Problems
Occasional Tests
  • Eye Tests

Lhatese Breed History

The Lhatese originates from the United States. Although we do not know much about the Lhatese' s history, we can study the parent breeds in order to understand the Lhatese's origins. The Lhasa Apso finds his roots in Tibet as a royal dog and the guardian of Tibetan monasteries. For centuries, the only way a person could own a Lhasa Apso was if the dog was gifted by the Dalai Lama. The Lhasa Apso made its way to the United States when the Dalai Lama gifted a pair of Lhasas to a Mr. Cutting from New Jersey. Cutting enjoyed breeding dogs, and his male and female are the ancestors of the Lhasas in the United States today. The Maltese is an ancient dog who can trace its origins to Greece, Rome, and Egypt. The Egyptians even thought that the dog had healing powers; they would place a Maltese in the bed of an ill person. Experts believe that he was developed into the modern Maltese on the Isle of Malta, where the dog of the ancients was interbred with Spitz or Spaniel-type dogs. The Maltese arrived in Britain around the time that Henry VIII was king. In fact, Queen Elizabeth owned a Maltese. The Maltese was brought to the United States by Englishmen.

Lhatese Breed Appearance

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Lhatese eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Lhatese nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
gray Lhatese coat
Gray
white Lhatese coat
White
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Lhatese straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Lhatese Breed Maintenance

Like his parent breeds, the Lhatese will have long, flowing locks. His fur will be long and soft, but is prone to matting. To prevent this, you will need to brush the Lhatese's coat daily. Some Lhatese owners prefer to groom their dogs every six to eight weeks, and you may choose to do this also. However, you will need to maintain daily brushing in the meantime. Another issue the Lhatese is likely to inherit from his parent breeds is tear stains under his eyes. You will need to clean the area under his eyes daily to prevent permanent stains. Some owners trim the hair under the eyes (in addition to hair in the ears) to help with the stains. Bathe him only when he gets dirty (or you can have this done at the groomer's). Fortunately, the Lhatese is a hypoallergenic breed. He sheds rarely. Clip his nails every two or three weeks, and brush his teeth two to three times a week to prevent the build-up of tartar and bad breath. However, if you'd like to prevent tooth decay, brush his teeth daily.
Brushes for Lhatese
Pin Brush
Dematter
Clipper
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Lhatese requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Lhatese Temperament

The Lhatese is a sweet, affectionate, and very playful companion. He is friendly and gentle. He is great with all members of the family, but he is especially good with children. However, experts do recommend that they are properly socialized from a young age so that they know what behavior is expected of them. They get along with other family pets as well. The Lhatese is very intelligent, but he can be hard to train sometimes. However, persistence pays off. The Lhatese is also a great watchdog. He will watch for strangers near your home, and he will bark to alert you to any strange activity. He is generally calm and loving and wants to please his family. While he is happiest when you are home to spend time with him, he is not prone to separation anxiety.

Lhatese Activity Requirements

The Lhatese is actually a rather active dog; however, he can be a good "lapdog" as well. To ensure you will have this down time with your Lhatese, you will need to provide him with short bursts of activity throughout the day. Remember that he is highly intelligent, and offering him exercise that also incorporates mental activity will be beneficial to him. You can accomplish this by giving him a variety of toys and playing different games with him. In other words, a simple game of fetch won't satisfy the mental necessities of the Lhatese. If you have an enclosed backyard, you can allow him several short trips outdoors to run off a little of his energy. He might also enjoy a trip to the dog park for a more varied exercise run.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
5 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

Lhatese Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$1 - $1
Monthly Cost
$25 - $30

Lhatese Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Lhatese size stats at six months
Height: 6 inches Weight: 5 lbs
Female Lhatese size stats at six months
Height: 6 inches Weight: 4 lbs
12 Months
Male Lhatese size stats at 12 months
Height: 9 inches Weight: 8 lbs
Female Lhatese size stats at 12 months
Height: 8 inches Weight: 8 lbs
18 Months
Male Lhatese size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 12 lbs
Female Lhatese size stats at 18 months
Height: 9 inches Weight: 11 lbs

Lhatese Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd