Silky Pug

9-13 lbs
7-11"
United States
Pug
Silky Terrier

The Silky Pug is a designer dog and is a cross between a Pug and a Silky Terrier. They are small dogs who have a big attitude. They are friendly mischievous little dogs that make great family pets. This breed will get on well with children and other dogs provided they are socialized early. When it comes training they can be a little stubborn so an owner will need to be patient and give lots of praise and positive reinforcement. Common colors may include black, tan, cream, apricot, silver, blue and grey. Silky Pugs have fine and short coats and do shed quite a bit but are not that hard to groom.

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Pug, Silky Terrier

Silky Pug Health

Average Size
Male Silky Pug size stats
Height: 8-12 inches Weight: 10-14 lbs
Female Silky Pug size stats
Height: 7-11 inches Weight: 9-13 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
  • Pug Dog Encephalitis
  • Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis
  • Spongiform Leukodystrophy
  • Liver Shunts
  • Urolithiasis
Minor Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Tracheal Collapse
  • Corneal Ulcer
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Allergies
  • Diabetes
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Blood
  • Liver Ultrasound
  • X-Rays
  • Physical Examination
  • Allergy Tests
  • CT or MRI scan
  • Hip and Knee
  • Skeletal Exam

Silky Pug Breed History

The Silky Pug is a designer breed that was developed by crossing a Silky Terrier and a Pug. The feisty Silky Terrier was developed in Australia in the 1890s and was a cross between Yorkshire Terriers, which had been brought over from England, and the larger, working Australian Terrier. Some of the Silky’s ancestors may also include the Dandie Dinmont Terrier, Skye Terrier and/or Cairn Terrier. The Silky Terrier was recognized as a distinct breed in New South Wales in 1906, and in Victoria in 1909. There were some differences when it came to the breed standard, mostly regarding the weight and ear type, but in 1926 a compromise was reached and a new breed standard formed. The breed was first known as the Sydney Silky but in 1955, this was changed to the Australian Silky Terrier, which is what they are still referred to in Australia. They were recognized by the Australian National Kennel Council in 1958. After World War II a number of Silky Terriers returned home with American soldiers. The Silky was accepted by the American Kennel Club in 1959. They are a member of the Toy Group. Pugs originated in China and were bred to be companions for ruling families. Some had mini palaces and their own guards. Buddhist monks also kept them as pets in Tibetan monasteries. In Europe a Pug became the official dog of the House of Orange in 1572 thanks to his bravery in alerting his master - the Prince of Orange - that assassins were heading his way. Marie Antoinette had a Pug named Mops while Josephine Bonaparte, had one named Fortuné that slept in her bed and was said to have bitten Napoleon when he got into bed with her for the first time. The wrinkled little dogs who wheeze, snort and snore also captured the imagination of artists like William Hogarth and Goya, while Queen Victoria was also a fan and bred them. Pugs arrived in the United States during the nineteenth century and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885.

Silky Pug Breed Appearance

The Silky Pug is a hybrid breed and is a cross between a Pug and a Silky Terrier. They are small dogs weighing up to 14 pounds and with a height of up to 12 inches. Common colors may include black, tan, cream, apricot, silver, blue and grey and they have fine and short to medium coats. Your pet may have eyes that protrude slightly from the Pug side, and deep wrinkles on the face. These dogs are small but sturdy and compact. They are likely to have short black muzzles and small ears that are often erect. They can have curly tails depending on the parent breed they most take after.

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Silky Pug eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Silky Pug nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
gray Silky Pug coat
Gray
blue Silky Pug coat
Blue
silver Silky Pug coat
Silver
cream Silky Pug coat
Cream
fawn Silky Pug coat
Fawn
black Silky Pug coat
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Silky Pug straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Silky Pug Breed Maintenance

When it comes to the Silky Pug, maintenance will depend on which parent breed your pet most takes after. The Pug has a short, double coat and while it does shed a lot, they are fairly easy to groom and keep in shape. The Silky Terrier’s coat is more high maintenance as it is longer and a bit like human hair. It is straight and fine and needs regular brushing and trimming to prevent tangles. The Silky Terrier is regarded as hypoallergenic so your pet may also be. Bathing is only needed occasionally. For good dental health, brush your dog’s teeth daily and as well, on a weekly basis check their ears for any debris. Trim the nails if they get too long.

Brushes for Silky Pug
Pin Brush
Slicker Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Silky Pug requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Silky Pug Temperament

The Silky Pug is likely to be a friendly, affectionate dog who thrives on human interaction. They are suited to owners who are prepared to devote a lot of time to their pet. And even though they wheeze, snort and snore they are likely to want to sleep with you and spend plenty of time cuddling on your lap. They are better suited to families with older children and early socialization and training will help them become confident dogs around all children and other pets. Despite wanting to lounge around with their owners they do also need a lot of exercise to be well-behaved and if they don’t they may dig or bark a lot. The Silky Pug is suitable for first time dog owners and with a bit of effort can be trained relatively easily. The Pug side can be a little stubborn but they will respond with plenty of praise and positive reinforcement. Although small dogs, the Silky Pug can be a good watch dog and will alert you if a stranger approaches.

Silky Pug Activity Requirements

The Silky Pug is an energetic dog who will need daily excercise to keep fit and healthy. If your dog has the short face of the Pug then they are likely to battle in the heat so try to exercise them when it is cooler. While your pet will love going for walks and visits to the dog park they do not need strenuous exercise. Bear in mind that your pet is likely to have quite a strong prey drive from the Terrier side so keep them on a leash when out in public. These dogs will love playing in a garden but are equally suited to apartment living provided they are taken out every day.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
5 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes

Silky Pug Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.70 - $1.00
Monthly Cost
$20.00 - $30.00

Silky Pug Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Silky Pug size stats at six months
Height: 7 inches Weight: 8 lbs
Female Silky Pug size stats at six months
Height: 6 inches Weight: 7 lbs
12 Months
Male Silky Pug size stats at 12 months
Height: 8 inches Weight: 9 lbs
Female Silky Pug size stats at 12 months
Height: 7 inches Weight: 8 lbs
18 Months
Male Silky Pug size stats at 18 months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 12 lbs
Female Silky Pug size stats at 18 months
Height: 9 inches Weight: 11 lbs

Silky Pug Owner Experiences

Coco
22 Months
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
snuggling
Playing
Coco is frightened oh strangers particularly men. He pulls hard on lead all the time. Chashes large dogs & nips on their back legs at dig park. Jumps & charges at other dogs when approaching on lead
2 months, 2 weeks ago
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