Bordoodle

45-55 lbs
12-17"
United States
Border Collie
Poodle
Borderpoo, Borpoo

What do you get when you cross a Border Collie with a Poodle? No, it’s not a joke — what you get is a Bordoodle. A mix between the herding Border Collie and the once-most-popular-dog-in-the-US, the Poodle, the Bordoodle (also known as the Borpoo or the Borderpoo) is a fascinating mix of characteristics. 

In this guide to everything Bordoodle-related, you’ll learn all about those characteristics as well as:

  • That both the US and Australia can lay claim to this phenomenal breed
  • Bordoodles are a fantastic pet to have if you have children
  • Main health concerns with a Bordoodle are hip dysplasia, epilepsy and progressive retinal atrophy


Bordoodle breed overview

What is a Bordoodle? Well, if you’re searching for a super-smart dog, look no further. A hybrid of two of the cleverest dogs on the planet, the Bordoodle — a Border Collie Poodle mix — has serious brain pedigree. This is a bright dog. Sacrificing none of its cuteness just because it is intelligent, the full grown Bordoodle is also adorable, playful and friendly; a perfect addition to pretty much any home, if you’re thinking about taking the Bordoodle plunge.




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purpose Purpose
Companion
history Date of Origin
Unknown
ancestry Ancestry
Border Collie and Poodle

Bordoodle Health

Average Size
Male Bordoodle size stats
Height: 15-20 inches Weight: 45-55 lbs
Female Bordoodle size stats
Height: 12-17 inches Weight: 45-55 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Epilepsy
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Minor Concerns
  • Allergies
Occasional Diagnoses
  • None
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • CT Scan
  • Eye Examination
  • Blood Work
  • Full Physical Examination
  • Allergy Testing

Bordoodle Breed History

We may not be able to say with precise certainty where and when the Bordoodle first sprang up, but both the United States and Australia began breeding this hybrid in the 1990s. As we’ve established, it’s a cross between a Border Collie and a Poodle. 

The Poodle, whose name once meant ‘puddle’ in German, is a water dog of disputed beginnings — some believe the dog originated in France, and others Germany. The Border Collie used to spend all its time herding sheep in its native Scotland, where it proudly boasted an ability to refrain from biting the sheep while going about its work.

Bordoodle Breed Appearance

A full grown Bordoodle will stand around 16 inches tall, but could be a few inches shorter or taller. It’s an athletic and graceful dog, and boasts a sturdy physique.

The dog’s hair is wavy and of medium length and can come in a variety of colors that usually feature gray, black, white and brown somewhere. More often than not, their eyes are brown. They have a rounded head and delightful ears that are often semi-erect or floppy.

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Bordoodle eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Bordoodle nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
gray Bordoodle coat
Gray
blue Bordoodle coat
Blue
black Bordoodle coat
Black
white Bordoodle coat
White
red Bordoodle coat
Red
sable Bordoodle coat
Sable
Coat Length
coat
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
coat density
pin
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
coat texture
Bordoodle wavy coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Bordoodle Breed Maintenance

The Bordoodle is generally considered close to being hypoallergenic — good news — but there are never any guarantees, so always do your research. You can be sure, however, that this is a dog that doesn’t shed all that much. Grooming isn’t a huge concern. Brush your pup’s coat a couple of times a week and you should be fine.

Most dogs don’t need much bathing, and you’ll be pleased to hear that the Bordoodle falls comfortably into this group. There’s no need to put your Bordoodle in the bath and wash its armpits unless it is dirty. 

In terms of exercise, however, this dog needs a good deal: it will expect and need around 30 minutes of exercise a day. If you can, incorporate things like obedience exercises into your walks with your Bordoodle: this is a canine cranium that needs to be stimulated 

often as possible. When — if — you buy a Bordoodle, do remember: you haven’t signed up to have a dog that sleeps on the sofa the whole time. This is an active dog that wants to play and exercise as much as it can.



Bordoodle health risks

With love and attention, a happy Bordoodle should live to around 15 years. But, like all pup parents, you need to prepare yourself for some potential health complications along the way. Here are three of the most common to occur in Bordoodles:

Hip dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is an issue that’s often diagnosed more frequently in larger dogs. It’s a term that means the ball and socket of both hip joints are malformed in some way, causing the head of the dog’s femur to grind in the socket of the joint, not glide smoothly.

Hip dysplasia can be caused by malnutrition, injury or weight gain and will be noticeable as a result of your dog not moving smoothly, not jumping, or having lameness in the hind legs.

When it comes to treating the condition, it will vary dog to dog but anti-inflammatory drugs are often prescribed, and most animals will be given joint supplements. Alongside this, physical therapy is helpful as well. Sometimes, surgery is necessary and advised by vets; your dog may need their hip replaced or they may have a femoral head/neck ostectomy. Whether or not you think this is affordable or necessary will depend on you and the exact circumstances of your furry friend.

Epilepsy

A potentially scary thing to witness in action, epilepsy is a brain disorder that will cause your dog to have seizures for no obvious reason. About one in 50 dogs may suffer a seizure in their lifetime; epilepsy is both common in dogs — comparative to animals like cats — and relatively rare. 

Your dog’s brain may seem completely ‘normal’, but from time to time it will trigger shaking and convulsions in your pup. The dog may sense the seizure is about to happen and seem anxious in the moments prior. When a seizure does occur, remember to remain calm; put your dog on its side and away from anything that might cause it pain; don’t put your hands near its mouth; and note down anything about the incident, including time, so that you can report it to a vet if necessary.

If a dog meets certain criteria, then anticonvulsant medication — the most popular example of which is phenobarbital — will be prescribed. Things tend to improve at this point and, if you administer the medication as instructed, your dog should be able to continue to live happily and healthily.

Progressive retinal atrophy

When the cells in a dog’s retina called photoreceptors degenerate, the animal develops a condition called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). This disease can be inherited or can rear its head later on. Puppies can develop PRA at a couple of months old but adult dogs can also develop it — between three and nine years into their life.

You may notice, especially at night, that your dog is beginning to see less well; you may notice this happening in the day. Because dogs rely less on their vision than humans, it may initially be relatively difficult to spot the onset of PRA.

There is, unfortunately, not much of a happy ending as far as PRA is concerned — the clue is in the word ‘progressive’. Though antioxidant vitamins or supplements may help to slow down the development of cataracts, they haven’t been proven to help PRA specifically. But, though your Bordoodle may be one of the unfortunate ones to lose their sight, that doesn’t mean they’ll be unhappy; they can still lead a perfectly joy-filled life with you at home.

As you can see, pet health has the potential to get complex and expensive. Wondering what kind of pet insurance you might need to help you if any of these conditions arise in your furry friend? Check out quotes from all the best companies here and browse wellness plans here.



Feeding a Bordoodle - what’s the best diet?

Because of this dog’s active lifestyle, nutrition is of course crucially important. Food that is high in protein should help give your beautiful Bordoodle the energy it needs. Be careful not to overfeed, as there are many health complications that obesity can trigger or exacerbate.

If you want comprehensive information about the best dog foods available, check out our friends at Dog Food Advisor — they have everything you need to know, and more.


Brushes for Bordoodle
Pin Brush
Pin Brush
Slicker Brush
Slicker Brush
Comb
Comb
Nail Clipper
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
fur daily fur weekly fur monthly
Bordoodle requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Bordoodle Temperament

Being a dog of fierce intelligence means that the Bordoodle is a fantastic dog to have around. It wants to be trained, it wants to be kept engaged, and it revels in human company, including that of children. There are precious few breeds that are better with kids than a Bordoodle. It may even learn to love your cats. The Bordoodle’s personality is one of the very finest around.

Do remember, though, that the dog’s fierce intelligence means that it can also be a touch on the stubborn side, especially if it feels as though it is not being sufficiently stimulated. 

Activity Level
low activity medium activity high activity
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
9 miles
walk mileage
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes
activity minutes

Bordoodle Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
cup per day cost cup per day cost cup per day cost
Daily Cost
$1.20 - $1.40
food bowls daily cost
Monthly Cost
$34.00 - $45.00
food bag monthly cost

Bordoodle Owner Experiences

Rosie
10 Months
1 People
Apartment
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
going on walks
Outings to stores
Visiting Family
Fetch
My bordoodle is extremely sweet and quite active, and if she gets a lot of exercise per day she will not be destructive of anything. Otherwise, she is a chewer when she gets bored. She is protective when people knock on the door and when others are out during our walks, but when she meets most people and animals she loves them. She is a bit wary of specific people, so I suspect she notices smells, etc that I cannot that makes her protective in those instances. When approached gently she is great, though she can be scared if approached aggressively or abruptly by new people. She is very intelligent and determined, and she picks up new commands very quickly. She is very loyal, obedient, affectionate, and she loves attention. She was easy to crate train and loves to run
2 years, 6 months ago
Indy
1 Year
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Fetch
Tug-of-war
Nap
Friendliest dog around. Eayst so train wenamne histoyso and after saying the name 1 or 2 times he will fetch his toys by name.
6 years, 3 months ago
Durango
3 Years
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Hiking
Running
Kisses
Cuddles
I rescued Durango from an abusive home, we have had some separation anxiety and now that he knows he is safe he is extremely protected of my fiancé and I. That being said he is one of the smartest, sweetest, gentlest dogs I have known. Despite what he’s gone through he has completely recovered and is as happy as can be.
4 years, 3 months ago
Sophie
10 Years
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Sophie is a dedicated family member, extremely friendly and gentle. While she will take all the attention and exercise she can get she can also lie patiently for hours waiting for her next activitiy
4 years, 2 months ago
Fuckadoodle
20 Years
9+ People
Studio
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Tug-of-war
Run
He bit my ass so I chucked him in the streets (he’s a toy for a stray dog now)
3 years, 10 months ago
Shaggy
1 Year
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Hike
Swim
Play
Tug-of-war
best dog in the world i love him so much great on the farm for herding animals!
3 years, 6 months ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd