Hip Dysplasia Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $1,500 - 15,000

Average Cost

$2,500

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What is Hip Dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia refers to the malformation of the ball and socket of one or both hip joints. The malformation causes the head of the femur to rub and grind in the joint socket instead of gliding smoothly and securely. The disorder is inherited through a number of genes and can result from inheritance, environmental factors, or a combination of both. The onset of dysplasia can occur at any age and results in pain, restricted movement and loss of hip function. Hip dysplasia is an inherited condition resulting from an improperly formed hip joint. Because the joint is loose, the dog's leg bone moves around too much, causing painful wear and tear. A physical exam will check for painful joints and reveal whether the pet has correct range of motion in the hip joints.

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Symptoms of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

Symptoms of hip dysplasia in dogs may or may not be present and depend on degree of joint inflammation, joint looseness, and disease duration.

  • Decreased activity
  • Hind limb lameness
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Difficulty jumping or climbing stairs
  • Bunny hopping
  • Decreased range of hip motion
  • Narrow hind limb stance
  • Loss of hind limb muscle mass
  • Painful hip joints

Causes of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

Early onset hip dysplasia can develop as early as 16 weeks of age. Later onset or geriatric dysplasia is often caused by osteoarthritis or joint cartilage degeneration. One or both joints may be affected. Causes of hip dysplasia can include:

  • Genetic susceptibility - Some breeds are genetically predisposed to hip dysplasia. Large breeds like German Shepherds, Great Danes and Saint Bernards are most commonly affected. Small breeds can also be affected by inherited hip dysplasia.
  • Rapid weight gain
  • Obesity
  • Injury
  • Malnutrition

Diagnosis of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

If you suspect your pet is showing signs of hip dysplasia or if you wish to have your pet examined for hip dysplasia, the veterinarian will gather a history of symptoms, onset and any past injuries. Genetic parentage information for your pet can also be helpful in diagnosing hip dysplasia. A physical exam will check for painful joints and reveal whether the pet has correct range of motion in the hip joints.

Radiographs provide the definitive diagnosis for hip dysplasia, allowing the vet to visualize shallow hip sockets and/or malformed femoral head. To obtain a breeding certificate, many breeds must undergo a series of radiographs to rule out hip dysplasia. There are currently two methods, OFA and PennHip, for detecting hip dysplasia for breeding purposes.

OFA

The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) has outlined a protocol to test for hip dysplasia in breeding dogs. The pet must be at least 2 years of age at the time radiographs are taken. The veterinarian provides x-rays that are then sent to the OFA for scoring. Anesthesia is recommended to get accurate radiographs. X-rays are reviewed by a panel of radiologists and a score is assigned based on breed and age. Hips are graded excellent, good, fair, borderline, mild, moderate or severe. Dogs with hips that score at borderline or lower cannot be assigned an OFA breeding number.

PennHip

This protocol comes from the University of Pennsylvania Hip Improvement Program. Radiographs are taken under heavy sedation and dogs as young as 16 weeks can be measured. Hips with a distraction index of greater than 0.3 are labelled degenerative joint disease susceptible.

Treatment of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

Diet and Weight Management

Proper nutrition and weight maintenance can be first and foremost in treating pain and progression of hip dysplasia. Large and fast-growing breeds should be fed a proper diet to prevent joint degeneration and have a low impact exercise program to strengthen muscles around joints. The veterinarian will have weight management and exercise recommendations for your pet’s age, breed and degree of hip dysplasia.

Oral supplements

Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements are safe and can aid in joint maintenance for osteoarthritis patients. They supply the building blocks needed for generate joint cartilage and inhibit damaging enzymes. Supplements may take up to 6 weeks to show effects.

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy provides low impact physical therapy to help loosen joints and develop muscle mass. Swimming is a good form of low impact physical therapy for hip dysplasia patients.

NSAIDS

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) relieve pain and reduce inflammation. They are not recommended for long-term use and liver function should be monitored every 6-12 months when using these medications.

Surgery

Surgery may be recommended for pets depending on age, size, activity level, degree of laxity and degree of degeneration.

  • Triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO) – Performed at less than 10 months old for pets with severe joint looseness but no joint damage. Breaks pelvic bone and realigns the hip joint.
  • Total hip replacement – Performed on pets with degenerative joint disease from chronic hip dysplasia. The hip joint is removed and replaced with an implant.
  • Excision arthroplasty – Performed only on pets less than 40 pounds. Head of the femur is removed and replaced with an implant. For degenerative joint disease patients and significantly less costly than total hip replacement.
  • Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis – Performed before 20 weeks of age, prior to symptoms of hip problems. Pelvic bones are fused together, changing the angle of the hips and lessening the chances of developing osteoarthritis.

Recovery of Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

Selective breeding and proper nutrition and exercise are the best methods of preventing hip dysplasia. Diet, exercise, massage, supplements and pain medications are all a part of managing hip dysplasia. Jumping and running should be avoided. Long walks and swimming are the best exercises for pets with hip dysplasia.

Most dogs recover well from surgery, can lead active lives free from pain, and have acceptable hip function (through range of motion varies with type of surgery). Follow-up appointments and x-rays will monitor healing and any changes in your pets hip dysplasia.

Providing carpeted ramps for stairs, the car, your bed or couch will help the pet get around comfortably. Hardwood or tile floors should be covered with rugs to prevent the pet from slipping.

Hip Dysplasia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Ruby
French Bulldog
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Hip Dysplasia

My dog is almost 7 and we just found out about her hip dysplasia about 6 months ago. We were told she was developing arthritis before by the same vets office but only recently been told about her condition. We thought she hurt her hip when she was about a year ago from jumping off my dads bed but are so upset now that I've been researching more on her condition that this is genetic. Ruby does not like water at all so swimming therapy is out of the question. Can you suggest any other therapy I can do with her?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3003 Recommendations
Hydrotherapy is a cornerstone of many management programs for dogs making it difficult in Ruby’s case; short walks on a lead and other restricted exercise are recommended to keep a dog active but not to cause further stress to the hips. I would consult with a Veterinary Physiotherapist to assess Ruby’s condition and to make an exercise plan for her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Camiel
Chihuahua
16 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

Is it illeagle to take my roomates dog to the vet for x-rays? The dog jumped out of her daughters arm and landed on her hip or leg. I did not see it happen, but she mentioned it to my roomate who is the owner. She just passed it off and said nothing. Its a chihuahua, and she is 16 yrs of our age. She only had a slight limp for about 2months. But now being about 3 or more she is having little difficult getting up. She just staggers a bit. But totally noticable. I pointed it out to the owner. i said look she is in pain i think. I she only replied with, "I dont Know What To do". Take her to the vet!! She doesnt want to spend the money on her own dog. Please help i cant stand watching her limp like this. She has lost alot of weight too. But she does constantly walk about the house. Does not let or even walk the dog outside. She has diaper pads for her to go poo and pee on in the house. No social life at all. I feel so sorry for this dog, and now she has to suffer like this. It's not fair. I am so heartbroken because of this. But anyway can i take her to the vet myself? Not forcably, but probably when the owner is at work.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1415 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It isn't illegal for you to take Camiel to be seen, no. Your roommate might appreciate it, since she doesn't seem to know what to do. At 16 years old, she might benefit from pain medication and might enjoy getting out of the house. A veterinarian can look at her, determine what might be going on, and recommend any testing or treatment that she needs. The only thing that you might need to be careful of is if the veterinarian recommends any kind of sedation or anything for x-rays if she needs them, you should get the owners permission for that, in case there are complications. I am glad that you want to help her, and hope that everything goes well for her.

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Snoopy
Boston Terrier
10 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hip sways

I recently got a 10 week old Boston terrier puppy. Everyone’s been telling me how funny he walks but I kind of just brushed it of thinking “well he’s a puppy he’s a little clumsy” but when I got home and looked up medical conditions Boston Terriers can have I began to worry. His hips do sway a little when walking but other than that he jumps and plays with other dogs. He does run with both his back feet at the same time but I don’t know if that’s just a puppy thing.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3003 Recommendations
There are many causes for back and hip issues especially in pure breed puppies; even though Snoopy isn’t showing any symptoms, you should have your Veterinarian take a closer look at your next vaccination visit and possibly have an x-ray done to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Angie
Wirehaired Dachshund
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Limping
Low Energy

hi there my dog angie had a traumatic fall off our 4th floor terrace 3 weeks ago. She has fracted her pelvic bone. She was in bed rest since then. Today we took Angie to the hospital and the Xray revealed one of her hind legs is dislocated/ Hip Dysplasia. the other one pretty much healed over time. She now limps and lying in bed all the time, has very low energy. Vet are not suggesting surgery because she just went through a critical herniated diaphragm surgery right after the accident and its too risky to go for another surgery so soon. She has been advised to go for hydrotherapy/ swimmming twice a week for a couple of months to gain back her muscle strength in the legs. But vet says it is unlikely she will recover 100% and run around like she used to. We are heartbroken. Is there any other remedy that you can suggest besides surgery and hydrotherapy? Can a dislocated bone heal over time just doing swimming? Please help and advise. Thank you

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3003 Recommendations
Each case should be taken on a case by case basis, surviving a four story fall is miraculous in itself; hydrotherapy should considered to improve movement and muscle tone, but any dislocation would depend on the degree of dislocation and I would consider the value in exploring surgical options (case by case). It is unlikely that Angie will be 100% or even 80% after this event, but any movement and walking should be considered as a good outcome given the circumstances. I would recommend consulting with an Orthopaedic Specialist to get their input on Angie’s case. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Basil
Gsp x vizsla
8 Months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Stiffness getting up
Lame on right hind

Medication Used

Metacam

Can my dog who is 8 months old and has acute hip dysplacia have a double hip replacement, or is he too young? He is on metacam but still lame on it, I am not letting him excercise but am swimming him a little

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3003 Recommendations

Hip replacement surgery in dogs is usually performed after the age of nine months; although some cases may be delayed for various reasons. It is good to give him rest, but the swimming is good low impact exercise. Ohio State University have a great page on hip replacement surgery which I’ve linked below which may be able to answer many questions for you; you may consider visiting an Orthopaedic Surgeon to perform the surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/our-services/orthopedic-surgery/faq-total-hip-replacement

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Copper
Boxer/bulldog/ridgeback
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

limited use of hind leg
Muscle Loss

My dog is 3 years old and has been slightly limping here and there. At a previous vet visit ~6 months ago, I was told that she was too young to be having hip issues and was given glucosamine supplements to try and help. The limping hasn't stopped, but she doesn't show any signs of pain when I try and stretch her and massage her hip. After playing at the park this weekend, she has stopped using her left hind leg and has lost a bit of muscle mass over the past few months. We can't currently afford x-rays or surgery, but we are starting her back up on the glucosamine and chondroitin supplements. Is there anything else we can be doing for her in the meantime while we are saving up for other options?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1415 Recommendations
Without being able to examine Copper, I cannot comment on what you might be doing to help her, but x-rays seem like a good idea. She may benefit as well from physical therapy to keep the muscle mass that she has, if there is a pet physical therapist in your area. I hope that all goes well for her.

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Valdez
Alaskan Malamute
25 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Medication Used

nil

My vet has said my 6month old Alaskan Malamute has laxity in one hip and we should come back in when 1 year old for xray. She has advised swimming. Is there anything else we can do in the meantime regarding treatment, supplements etc?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3003 Recommendations
Supplements are not going to help with joint laxity as the articular surface is alright; low impact exercise like swimming and short walks on a lead may help too. Once Valdez has fully grown the true extent can be assessed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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