Silky Tzu

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7-12 lbs
5-7"
United States
Silky Terrier
Shih Tzu

The Silky Tzu is a designer dog and is a mix between a purebred Silky Terrier and a purebred Shih Tzu. They are small, cute dogs who make affectionate family pets although are best suited for those with older children. They are playful and lively dogs who love being cuddled and although they need daily exercise it doesn’t need to be for long.They are known to wheeze and snore and are sensitive to the heat. Common colors may include red, white, brown, black, cream and tan. They are likely to have a double coat that is thick, silky and wavy and is usually hypoallergenic so good for people who suffer from allergies. They do need quite regular brushing and trimming.

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Silky Terrier, Shih-Tzu

Silky Tzu Health

Average Size
Male Silky Tzu size stats
Height: 6-8 inches Weight: 8-13 lbs
Female Silky Tzu size stats
Height: 5-7 inches Weight: 7-12 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
  • Brachycephalic Syndrome
  • Spongiform Leukodystrophy
  • Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD)
Minor Concerns
  • Otitis Externa
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Urolithiasis
  • Tracheal Collapse
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Eye Problems
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Skeletal
  • X-Rays
  • Physical Examination
  • Hip and Knee
  • Blood and Urine Protein Screens

Silky Tzu Breed History

The Silky Tzu is a designer breed that was developed by crossing a Silky Terrier and a Shih Tzu. The Silky Terrier with its long, flowing silky coat is quite an efficient hunter of small vermin. These tough little terriers are the result of the cross breeding of Yorkshire Terriers, brought over from England to Australia, and larger, working Australian Terriers in the late 19th century. At the time, some looked more like the Australian Terriers and were shown as such, while others were exhibited either as Yorkies or Silkies. Other ancestors are thought to include the Dandie Dinmont Terrier, Skye Terrier or Cairn Terrier. Two different breed standards were drawn up - one in Sydney in 1906 and another in Victoria in 1909. There were differences in the weight and ear type but a compromise was later reached and a new breed standard came out in 1926. Legislation was introduced six years later by the Kennel Control Council of Victoria to prevent further cross breedings between the Yorkshire, Australian and the then-called Sydney Silky Terriers. They are still referred to as the Australian Silky Terrier in Autralia but are known elsewhere as the Silky Terrier. The Shih Tzu or little lion, unlike his name suggests, doesn’t hunt or guard. Their main purpose is to be a devoted companion something it appears they  have been doing since ancient times. They are among the oldest dog breeds. Also known as the Chrysanthemum Dog, some believe they were developed by Tibetan Monks and given as gifts to Chinese royalty. It is also thought they have been developed in China by crossing the Lhaso Apso and the Pekingnese. The Dalai Lama is said to have given a pair ot Shih Tzus to Empress T'zu Hsi during her reign and the dogs were said to have lived in their own palace. The dogs were so highly regarded that, for years, the Chinese refused to sell, trade, or give any away. The first Shih Tzus appeared in England in 1928 and later in the United States. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member of the Toy Group In 1969.

Silky Tzu Breed Appearance

The Silky Tzu is a hybrid breed and is a mix between a purebred Silky Terrier and a purebred Shih Tzu. They are toy-sized dogs usually weighing between 8 and 13 pounds with a height of up to 8 inches. Common colors may include red, white, brown, black, cream and tan. They are likely to have a double coat that is thick, silky and wavy. They have round faces with bright eyes and a black nose. Their eyes are usually dark brown although some can be lighter. The muzzle is short and small and the furry tail can curve over the back. The ears tend to flop forward.

Eye Color Possibilities
hazel Silky Tzu eyes
Hazel
brown Silky Tzu eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Silky Tzu nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
fawn Silky Tzu coat
Fawn
cream Silky Tzu coat
Cream
brown Silky Tzu coat
Brown
black Silky Tzu coat
Black
white Silky Tzu coat
White
red Silky Tzu coat
Red
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Silky Tzu wavy coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Silky Tzu Breed Maintenance

The Silky Tzu does need regular brushing to prevent the thick, silky and wavy coat from tangling. They don’t shed a lot and with both parent breeds being hypoallergenic the Silky Tzu will also be making him perfect for those who suffer from allergies. These dogs don’t have a strong doggy aroma so there is no need for regular bathing. This can also dry out the skin so try to avoid bathing unless absolutely necessary. Good habits to get into are checking the ears for any dirt or signs of infection and clippng the nails when needed. Try to brush your pet’s teeth daily to prevent dental problems from developing.

Brushes for Silky Tzu
Pin Brush
Slicker Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Silky Tzu requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Silky Tzu Temperament

The Silky Tzu is a friendly affectionate little dog who is known to snort and wheeze from time to time. They make excellent family pets easily fitting into smaller homes or apartments but would do best in a home where the children are a little older. These dogs are very playful and love toys and other dogs. Early socialization and training is best to make your pet confident around new people and situations. The Silky Tzu does bark occasionally and will warn you if a stranger approaches but is not regarded as a watch dog. They are energetic and love being included in family activities. They are suitable for first time dog owners especially those who have the time to devote to their pet. They are also quite easy to train with lots of praise and plenty of positive reinforcement. These dogs can occasionally be difficult to housetrain, but with patience they will eventually learn.

Silky Tzu Activity Requirements

The Silky Tzu is an active energetic little dog but won’t need strenuous exercise. They will love a short walk around the neighbourhood or to the dog park or beach. They are very playful and will be happy to play with their toys or ball inside. They are adaptable dogs who will just as easily live in a house with a large garden or an apartment provided they are taken out regularly for exercise. They are sensitive to the heat and cold so they shouldn’t be exercised when it is very hot in summer. In winter they will need to spend more time indoors.


Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
4 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
40 minutes

Silky Tzu Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$20 - $30

Silky Tzu Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Silky Tzu size stats at six months
Height: 5 inches Weight: 7 lbs
Female Silky Tzu size stats at six months
Height: 4 inches Weight: 7 lbs
12 Months
Male Silky Tzu size stats at 12 months
Height: 6 inches Weight: 7 lbs
Female Silky Tzu size stats at 12 months
Height: 5 inches Weight: 7 lbs
18 Months
Male Silky Tzu size stats at 18 months
Height: 7 inches Weight: 10 lbs
Female Silky Tzu size stats at 18 months
Height: 6 inches Weight: 9 lbs

Silky Tzu Owner Experiences

Benny
4 Years
3 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Agility training
Trick training
He’s a rescue and we never knew what he was. Did a dna test and came back 50/50 for Shih Tzu and silky terrier. He loves agility and learning fancy tricks. He does have leash reactivity but other than that he’s super friendly toward anyone.
19 hours ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd