Giant Schnoodle

100-120 lbs
22-24"
United States
Giant Schnauzer
Standard Poodle

The devoted Giant Schnoodle is a hybrid dog breed where the stately Giant Schnauzer is crossed with the highly intelligent Poodle. A large dog, this hybrid dog breed will typically be relaxed with an upbeat personality and plenty of smarts. The Giant Schnoodle will enjoy being with his people and will do well with children.
He will also love to play and take part in exercise that involves thinking. Of independent nature, he may be stubborn during training, though as a bright dog, with consistency he can pick up commands easily.

purpose Purpose
Companion
history Date of Origin
Unknown
ancestry Ancestry
Giant Schnauzer and Standard Poodle

Giant Schnoodle Health

Average Size
Male Giant Schnoodle size stats
Height: 27-33 inches Weight: 100-120 lbs
Female Giant Schnoodle size stats
Height: 22-24 inches Weight: 100-120 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Addison's Disease
  • Mitral Valve Disease
  • Cobalamin Malabsorption
  • Sebaceous Adentitis
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Chronic Anemia
  • Autoimmune Thyroiditis
  • Corneal Dystrophy
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Unknown
Occasional Tests
  • Hip
  • Thyroid Tests
  • Eye Examination
  • Blood Tests and Analysis
  • Heart Analysis

Giant Schnoodle Breed History

The hybrid dog breed called the Giant Schnoodle is a new breed of dog that does not have a detailed history. However, the two dog breeds that combine to make the Giant Schnoodle have long histories that can be looked at. While its date of origin is not clear, the Giant Schnauzer derives from the Standard Schnauzer, a canine shown in artwork as far back as 1492.
The Giant Schnauzer is a result of the Standard Schnauzer being bred with dogs that are larger (such as the Great Dane). The development of these dogs created a breed to work as a herder as well as to guard livestock. The original role of the Giant Schnauzer was to drive cattle to the market. By the beginning of the 20th century, the role of the Giant Schnauzer changed to where he was guarding breweries, stockyards and butcher shops. They have also been trained for police work, though as a result of their size and potential aggression, they are now rarely used for police work in the United States and Europe. The American Kennel Club first recognized the Giant Schnauzer in 1930.
Thought to be one of the oldest breeds, the Poodle originated in Germany but developed to the breed we now know in France from a combination of European dogs, along with the North African Barbet. It may also be possible that the Poodle descended from Asian herding dogs and became the German Water dog while with the Ostrogoth and German Goth tribes. Another theory is that the Poodle descended from the Asian steppes who found themselves in Portugal after defeating the North African Berbers in the 8th century. At first, the Poodle was a water dog; in France it was known for its duck-hunting abilities. The breed has served man well as a guide dog, guard dog, service dog and performing dog. The American Kennel Club registered their first Poodle in 1888.

Giant Schnoodle Breed Appearance

The Giant Schnoodle is a hybrid dog breed from the Giant Schnauzer and Standard Poodle, an attractive canine averaging anywhere from 100 to 120 pounds. He will have a thick, wavy coat that does not shed and can be seen in black as well as silver, tan and white mixes. Like his parent breeds, the Giant Schnoodle will be well-proportioned and strong with an air of dignity and pride. He may have the square snout of the Giant Schnauzer parent or the finer, pointier muzzle of the Poodle. His ears will be folded over or maybe even long enough to hang down in the pendant fashion. His eyes will be dark and bright and clearly display the intuitiveness he possesses. 

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Giant Schnoodle eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Giant Schnoodle nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
black Giant Schnoodle coat
Black
silver Giant Schnoodle coat
Silver
white Giant Schnoodle coat
White
Coat Length
coat
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
coat density
pin
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
coat texture
Giant Schnoodle wavy coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Giant Schnoodle Breed Maintenance

It will not be hard to maintain your Giant Schnoodle. It is recommended that his hair be brushed a few times per week and that he be bathed once a month. Professional grooming may be required every three months.

The Giant Schnoodle does not shed and is considered hypoallergenic. As with all dogs, it is recommended that the teeth of your Giant Schnoodle be brushed several times each week and that his nails be clipped as needed. Providing chew toys to your Giant Schnoodle may be helpful so that he remains busy and does not chew on other items in your home. Being outside is important for the Giant Schnoodle, who will benefit from a fenced-in outdoor space.

Insuring your Giant Schnoodle puppy as soon as “pawssible” is essential for preventing high vet care costs. Start comparing insurance plans from leading insurers like Healthy Paws and Embrace and save over $270 a year.

Brushes for Giant Schnoodle
Pin Brush
Pin Brush
Comb
Comb
Scissors
Scissors
Nail Clipper
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
fur daily fur weekly fur monthly
Giant Schnoodle requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Giant Schnoodle Temperament

The Giant Schnoodle is typically good at understanding social situations and acting appropriately in response. Dogs of the hybrid are usually energetic and playful and the breed’s gentle nature makes the Giant Schnoodle a great choice for a home with children. The Giant Schnoodle will be easy to distract, especially when a rodent, cat or other dog comes close. The Giant Schnoodle is loving and will form a close bond with his owner. This agile dog can be an independent thinker, meaning that training can be challenging and will require a consistent program. As a Giant Schnoodle gets older, he will typically calm down.

Giant Schnoodle Activity Requirements

As the parent breeds of the Giant Schnoodle both have a high amount of energy, it is likely that your hybrid will as well.  Daily dog walks as well as time to play outdoors will be important for the physical and mental health of your Giant Schnoodle. When a dog of an active inquisitive nature does not get the exercise for both mind and body as needed, it can result in some mischievous behavior. This hybrid dog breed can excel at obedience trials if given the chance to try.

Activity Level
low activity medium activity high activity
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
12 miles
walk mileage
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes
activity minutes

Giant Schnoodle Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
4 cups
cup per day cost cup per day cost cup per day cost cup per day cost
Daily Cost
$2.75 - $3.00
food bowls daily cost
Monthly Cost
$80.00 - $90.00
food bag monthly cost

Giant Schnoodle Owner Experiences

Stug
5 Months
2 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Find
Walk
Fetch,
Catch treats
She has been a joy, easy to house train with consistency, we established one of us to train her as the alpha, she’s smart, loyal, funny, gentle, loving and protective. Gets along well with the cat and our other giant schnauzer. We adore her. Any dog with patience and training can be amazing. They’re just like children really, only alot cheaper and easier to teach.
1 month, 3 weeks ago
Winston
6 Months
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
treats
swimming
Fetch
Bath time
Car rides
Walks
Winston has been a very fun, silly, and affectionate boy. He does have some issues with being left alone, but he has been getting better with it. He's about 40.5 pounds at 5 1/2 months and he loves to eat and drink. He can go through bowl after bowl of water, but this has led to some difficulty in house training. Overall, he is such a loving dog and is a joy to have in the house.
3 years, 5 months ago
Smoky
2 Years
3 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walk
Run
Guard dog
Look out the window
Fetch
Brushing
Smoky has been a great dog! He was about 65 lbs at 1.5yrs. He’d probably be bigger but got a bad stomach bug around 4-5 months old, it almost killed him but we all fought to save him. He was an only child for a while, but has done great with the other 2 pups we got and our now 1 year old son. He’s loyal to a fault, but also territorial. His favorite pastime is barking real loud to scare us- you can almost see his smirk after he does it.
3 years ago
Lady
1 Year
3 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Chase
Fetch
Run
toys
Brushing
Lady loves her toys! She can be found 99% of the time with a stuffed toy in her mouth. We got her the same day I ended up going into labor with our son- now those two are the best of friends. I know they will be into a lot of mischief as he grows up. She’s the absolute sweetest dog and such a beautiful girl. Her only downside is that she will chew on anything, regardless of how many toys she has! It doesn’t help that our son will give her his toys to play with either.
3 years ago
Finnegan
5 Months
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
doing tricks
Watch tv
Hide & Seek
football
Giving baths
Finn has been a blessing to our family. He is such a sweet puppy and loves to play football and fetch with my sons ages 15 and 10. He knew how to sit, lay down, stay, and rollover by 3months. He is super smart but can be a little stubborn at times. He does love our cats and wants them to play with him but they don't want any part of him.
2 years, 10 months ago
Oscar
24 Months
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Highly intelligent. Very sweet and affectionate. Likes to be next to you, on the coach or in bed. When I move from room to room, he's always following me.
1 year, 8 months ago
Tilly
3 Years
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
She is the light of our lives and we would be sad without her
1 year, 4 months ago
Motzart
8 Weeks
2 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking
Playing
We just pick her up two days ago and already see how smart she is. She observes before and action taken, already shows she follows commands easily and loves to play.
1 year, 3 months ago
PJ
10 Weeks
3 People
Apartment
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
We haven’t had her long, but she is a handful. Most concerned with chasing kids. And nipping at then and their clothes. She’s hard to calm down. Rather concerned
1 year, 1 month ago
Duchess
8 Years
2 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking
Fetch
Following me everywhere in the house
toothbrushing
Find the toy game
Watching movies
Duchess is so smart, kind, and the most gentle temperament I have ever seen in a dog. As a puppy, we went to clicker and positive reinforcement trainings, and established me as the alpha in our family (with 2 growing kids then). That resolved any stubborn trait. Chewing on stuff was resolved with exercises/play, appropriate size of antlers, commands, and established trust routines to decrease separation anxiety when left her alone as we went to work/school. Since then, we never had behavior issues with her. Excellent guard dog! Now a senior dog, she is so spoiled with our grown up sons. We are all so thankful and blessed to have her!
11 months, 1 week ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd