Cardigan Welsh Corgi

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25-34 lbs
10-12"
Wales
Yard-Long Dog

These foxy looking dogs are full of energy and intelligence, ready to give love without fail. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi shares some ancestry with the Dachshund, which is most likely where their long and short bodies came from. Originally, they even had floppy ears, but after some selective breeding the more erect ears came to be part of the Cardigan breed. There is no doubt that while these dogs were originally used for herding cattle, they know how to be an excellent companion dog. A big dog in a tiny body, the Cardigan is a goofball that makes an outstanding house pet. He loves to be wholly involved with his family and is full of fun, making him a great dog to have around children. Originally developed in Wales, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is fondly known as the “yard-long dog” and was once used to herd cattle, guard farms, and hunt vermin. Even though he may still have an urge to herd every once in a while, the Cardigan is now primarily used in shows and as a house pet.

Purpose
cattle driving, farm guarding, hunting, companionship
Date of Origin
ancient times
Ancestry
dachshund, collie, pomeranian

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Health

Sketch of Cardigan Welsh Corgi
Average Size
Male Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats
Height: 10-12 inches Weight: 30-38 lbs
Female Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats
Height: 10-12 inches Weight: 25-34 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Usually A Very Healthy Breed
Minor Concerns
  • Intervertebral Disc Disease
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • (Dna Test For Pra)
  • X-Rays

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed History

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi got his name from the decorative tail he has, which resembles the long sleeves of a cardigan. Corgi literally means “dwarf dog” and this cute canine originated in Wales. In early days he and his cousin, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, were considered to be of the same breed until the Kennel Club of Britain separated them in 1934. The division was a good move for the Cardigan Welsh Corgi as the breed had a hard time competing with the Pembroke, but once he broke into his own category, his popularity began to increase. Thanks to the importation of some Corgis to the state of Massachusetts in 1931, the Corgi breed was introduced to the United States. Just a few years later in 1935, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed and the Cardigan Welsh Corgi was introduced to the show ring. They did well in competition and their popularity continued to grow. Even though the Cardigan is still less popular than the Pembroke, the breed is far from forgotten. Now they are happily entered in shows and loved by families all over.

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed Appearance

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a low set, small dog that is close to the ground and very long. They have large, slightly rounded triangular ears, a wide head that tapers to a pointed nose, and bright eyes that are full of intelligence and life. This breed comes in a wide range of colors from brindle to black and typically have accents on the tip of the ears and toes, and sometimes a mask or freckles on the face. White patches are usually found on the chest, underarms, muzzle, tip of the tail, and the blaze. The shape and size of these white patches vary from dog to dog. The Cardigan is a very handsome dog that has speed and surprising endurance, typical of a dog that was at one time a herder. His long body stems from his Dachshund heritage while, most likely, the bushy tail and coloring is taking from the Collie and Pomeranian influence.

Appearance of Cardigan Welsh Corgi
Eye Color Possibilities
blue Cardigan Welsh Corgi eyes
Blue
brown Cardigan Welsh Corgi eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Cardigan Welsh Corgi nose
Black
brown Cardigan Welsh Corgi nose
Brown
Coat Color Possibilities
brindle Cardigan Welsh Corgi coat
Brindle
black Cardigan Welsh Corgi coat
Black
red Cardigan Welsh Corgi coat
Red
blue Cardigan Welsh Corgi coat
Blue
sable Cardigan Welsh Corgi coat
Sable
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Cardigan Welsh Corgi straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed Maintenance

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi tends to shed often and heavily throughout the year, and to the extreme twice a year. This is because of their thick, medium length double coat. In order to try and keep the shedding to a more manageable amount, brushing should take place weekly using tools such as a shedding blade and slicker brush. Thankfully, the Cardigan’s coat repels dirt and doesn’t have an odor, so other than brushing, the coat is easy to maintain and frequent bathing isn’t necessary. Besides brushing, it is important to keep your dog’s nails trimmed and his ears cleaned. This will ensure that his feet stay healthy and comfortable and no ear infections set in. Due to the fact that the Cardigan Welsh Corgi has upright, alert ears, there isn’t a high of a risk of the ears getting too moist; however, it is better to frequently check for things such as ticks and other mites in order to keep the ears as healthy as possible.

Brushes for Cardigan Welsh Corgi
Pin Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Cardigan Welsh Corgi requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Temperament

There is no doubt that the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a fun loving dog with all the common traits of a herder: loyal, loving, and even-tempered. He loves spending time with his family and is extremely adaptable, so no matter whether you live in a big house or a small apartment the Cardigan will be happy. This breed does very well with small children and other pets and thoroughly enjoys having another dog to keep him company. Be sure to train your pup young and have him properly socialized so that he knows how to behave around humans and dogs alike. The Cardigan is a very intelligent and athletic breed, so he will be happiest playing games such as fetch, or even agility courses. No matter what you choose to do with you Cardigan Welsh Corgi, you can be sure he will love doing it so long as the activity is with you. 

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
7 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Popularity

Popularity ranking
#69
Popular Hybrids
Cardigan Corswiss
Cardigan Welsh Corgi
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
Cardigan Corswiss
Cardigan Pembroke Corgi
Cardigan Welsh Corgi
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Cardigan Pembroke Corgi
West Highland Corgi
West Highland White Terrier
Cardigan Welsh Corgi
West Highland Corgi

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
2.2 cups
Daily Cost
$1.2 - $1.4
Monthly Cost
$34 - $45

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Height & Weight

6 Months
Sketch of Cardigan Welsh Corgi at six months
Male Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats at six months
Height: 5 inches Weight: 16 lbs
Female Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats at six months
Height: 5 inches Weight: 14 lbs
12 Months
Sketch of Cardigan Welsh Corgi at 12 months
Male Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats at 12 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 27 lbs
Female Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats at 12 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 24 lbs
18 Months
Sketch of Cardigan Welsh Corgi at 18 months
Male Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 34 lbs
Female Cardigan Welsh Corgi size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 29 lbs

Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breeders

Check out who made our list for the most reputable Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeders of 2018.
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Aelwyd Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Aelwyd Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Tucson, Arizona
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Montaire Kennels
Montaire Kennels
Tucson, Arizona
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder SunSpark Siberians and Cardigan Welsh Corgis
SunSpark Siberians and Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Phoenix, Arizona
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Glasshouse Kennel
Glasshouse Kennel
Ventura, California
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Telltail Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Telltail Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Palm City, Florida
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Foggy Bottom Summit
Foggy Bottom Summit
Central City, Iowa
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Foxboro Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Foxboro Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Hayden, Idaho
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Davenitch Cardigans
Davenitch Cardigans
Andalusia, Alabama
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Doxford Kennel
Doxford Kennel
Geneseo, Illinois
Top Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeder Blu Skyy Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Blu Skyy Cardigan Welsh Corgis
Lawrence, Kansas

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Owner Experiences

4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
The Cardigan Welsh Corgis has powerful little sturdy legs. Many see him and think he cannot walk well, but do not let the boney short legs fool you. These dogs are listed a herders by the AKC and they mean it. They are quick, agile and love to be outside. They are definitely powerful little workers of deceptive speed and grace. I have found they love to chase any and everything they can find and will be able to find birds, rabbits and squirrels in bushes and flush them out. His short size means he can get in some places that are hairy, so be careful not to let him get tangled up. He does keep a great pace and loves to be out and about. If you can keep him going forward and moving you will have a great determined walker. They weigh only about 25 to 34 pounds, with females at the lower end of the range, so they are particularly easy to handle.
6 months ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking
The Corgies I have walked are extremely well behaved and are generally mellow in nature. They rarely get worked up about anything, they are overall easy going. When you want to go a different direction or take them somewhere else they are happy to go wherever with you. They always have a smile on their face and are happy to spend time with people.
6 months ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walks
Being pampered
Playing with others
Cuddles
I've walked several Cardigan Welsh Corgi's in my time and one thing they all had in common is how friendly and adventurous they can be. These pups are extremely versatile when it comes to being active outside or being a complete potato inside which to me makes them great for both the younger and older people on the dog-owning spectrum. When they're young they are full of energy and may find themselves getting into trouble but they are great at learning so with a bit of patience and time you can definitely model out a great companion from this breed. They pick up on body cues very easy and are so sweet and lovable who wouldn't want to own one of these peach bottom beauties!
6 months ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
sniffing and marking territory, and eating treats
Very friendly and eager for walks. Have walked him several times. He prefers particular routes but is very easygoing. He is very popular with the ladies on the streets. He is super long, so he is extra adorable!
6 months ago
8 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Eating Snacks
Dog Parks
Explore the city
Chase
Play
Walk
Harper is a timid, little cardigan welsh corgi with a heart of gold. She seems conflicted between her desire to romp and by her fear of thresholds, people she doesn't know, things that move unexpectedly, loud noises, elevators, bicyclists, getting her harness put on, etc. Once I arrive at Harper's home, I find her penned up and waggling with excitement. The moment I open her cage, because she knows that the harness act looms near, she cowers and scurries out of reach. Since our first walk I've been working with this behavior: we do a series of unrelated tricks prior to putting her harness on. Though this doesn't dispel her fear completely, it does distract her enough to minimize the challenge. After discussions with the owner, it seems clear that she is naturally timid or experienced something prior to her rehoming. She has a habit of squinting when she is frightened. Once we've got her harness in place she squints through the apartment's threshold, through the hallway, and onto the elevator and then, after disembarking, her fear disappears. Typically Harper and I walk to the park and chase birds, work on heeling, and play with sticks and balls. She'll romp like the best of them when we're out playing and working on tricks. On other occasions we interact with other dogs in the park or walk around Williamsburg to work on interaction skills, focus, and leash skills. With each walk her skills improve quite dramatically--she is a receptive pup after all! During our last walk we ran into a dachshund puppy (only a few weeks old!) and Harper's behavior was absolutely incredible. She was gentle, curious, playful, and highly willing to share the pup's toy without any hesitation or aggression. Though willing to break from the surprise playtime with grace and ease, her interaction showed signs that she would have little issues with socialization during her further development. After our walks, putting her back into her pen can sometimes be a challenge. She is as hesitant to have the harness removed as she is to have it put on. I usually leave her on the leash while I refill her water bowl, grab a handful of treats, and remove her harness near the cage. While doling out pieces of her favorite treat and petting her, I gently coax her into her cage. Once in, she quietly lays down. Overall, Harper is a fantastic dog who will benefit from a steady and gentle training regiment. She's learning fast!
6 months ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Positive reinforcement
fast walking
Explore the city
Corgis are friendly in nature. However, they do create biases against certain stimuli they deem questionable such as bikes, other dogs, cars, rollerblades. Corgis, if not trained properly, are not afraid to pull hard on the leash. They like to take off running to get out pent up energies and explore their surroundings. While dependent from dog to dog, Corgis are fairly calm and sweet. They like affection but don't require it all of the time.
6 months ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Corgis are the best! They are so fun and friendly, and while they have the energy of larger dogs, they don't have the strength and are often very polite on-leash. Be prepared to get stopped often on the street when walking these dogs, they are crowd favorites! While these dogs may seem to have endless energy, they do have smaller legs and stockier builds which can mean they get tired easily. Letting them stop and sniff things can be a good break to make sure they make it the whole walk. But they are still curious, so make sure that they aren’t eating whatever they are smelling. Not overly strong, they don’t pull on the leash too much! A great, cute dog, one of my favorite breeds!
6 months ago
1 Year
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking
The corgi I walked was a sweet boy who would pee when I got to his home because he got so excited to see me. Roger was pretty good on a leash outside. He was low to the ground, so he loved to lunge for food. He was always very excited to see other dogs, but he didn't really know what to do when he got close to them and normally ended up growling. Roger loved to say hi to people and chase after birds. Corgis are very sweet and friendly pups!
6 months ago
18 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Originally bred for farm work, including herding sheep and cattle. Cardigan Welsh Corgis were bred long and low to make sure that any kicks by cattle would travel safely over the dogs' heads without touching them. Known as "a big dog in a small package,"[citation needed]
6 months, 1 week ago
11 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Laying in the sun
Walk
Get massages
He would listen to you when he wanted too. He was very curious to kids and other dogs. He likes to play with them. He only wanted to go at a slow stroll pace and make his own path. He liked to roll around in the grass too.
6 months, 1 week ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
petting
Walking
The Corgi's I have walked have been very sweet, and have loved being out and about. They are small but mighty! They have kept to a pretty quick pace, and are interested in meeting other dogs but do not get too excited and have never been aggressive around other dogs. The Corgi's have never been aggressive when I arrive to an apartment, but just seem to be curious.
6 months, 1 week ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd