Bernedoodle

10-90 lbs
12-29"
United States
Bernese Mountain Dog
Poodle
Bernese Mountain Poo, Bernesepoo, Bernesedoodle, Bernepoo

The Bernedoodle is a crossbreed that was developed between two pure breeds in the early 2000s when the ‘Doodle’ mixed breeds were becoming popular. This dog can vary in both looks and temperament depending on which breed is dominant — the Poodle or the Bernese Mountain Dog. 

In this guide to the Bernedoodle, you’ll learn:

  • The Bernedoodle is a cross between a Bernese Mountain Dog and a Poodle. 
  • There are three sizes of Bernedoodle: Toy, Mini and Standard. 
  • The Bernedoodle is hypoallergenic, particularly if the Poodle is the dominant breed. 
  • Bernedoodles are a playful and affectionate breed.


Bernedoodle breed overview

What is a Bernedoodle? It’s a mixed breed, developed by breeding Bernese Mountain Dogs and Poodles. 

The Bernese Mountain Dog originated in Switzerland, while the Poodle originated in Germany and France. The first official Bernedoodle, however, is believed to come from Canada. There are three sizes: Toy, Mini and Standard. The size is dependent on whether the Bernese Mountain Dog is crossed with a Toy Poodle, a Miniature Poodle or a Standard Poodle.

You can rescue and rehome Bernedoodles. However, if you’ve been looking at Bernedoodle puppies and considering buying one, then expect it to cost you between $2,000 and $5,000. A Mini Bernedoodle is often the most expensive type, and you may pay more for those with unique colors such as merle and tricolor. 

The Bernedoodle lifespan can be as long as 18 years. The Toy Bernedoodle is the smallest and so tends to live the longest. 



From their diet to training, there’s a lot to think about when you get a dog. In all the excitement you don’t want to forget about insurance. It’s quick and easy to browse and compare the best pet insurance plans so you have peace of mind your pup is covered for any unexpected health issues. 




purpose Purpose
Companion
history Date of Origin
2003
ancestry Ancestry
Bernese Mountain Dog, Poodle

Bernedoodle Health

Average Size
Male Bernedoodle size stats
Height: 12-29 inches Weight: 10-90 lbs
Female Bernedoodle size stats
Height: 12-29 inches Weight: 10-90 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Sebaceous Adenitis
  • Hip Dysplasia
Minor Concerns
  • Cataracts
  • Color Dilution Alopecia
  • Hyperadrenocorticism
  • Hypoadrenocorticism
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • Elbow
  • Blood
  • Skin Scraping

Bernedoodle Breed History

Although it may not have been the first time breeding these two dogs, the first intentional breeding of a Bernese Mountain Dog and a Poodle was in Canada in 2003. It was in Ontario that Sherry Rupke bred her first litter of Bernedoodles before continuing to develop the hybrid. 

The Bernese Mountain Dog gets its name from Bern, the area of Switzerland from where it originated. It was here, on farmlands, that the breed was developed as a working dog to pull carts, herd cattle and be a watchdog. This is a large, sturdy breed that makes a loving and loyal companion.

The Poodle, on the other hand, comes from Germany and France where it dates back to the early 1400s. During this time the breed was a retriever of waterfowl for hunters. Its name comes from the German word “pudel” or “pudelin” meaning to splash and from the French term “chian canard” meaning duck dog. Their coat, which today is often groomed for shows, was developed for practical purposes including reducing the chance of the fur snagging on underwater debris while they pursued their prey.

The Bernedoodle isn’t recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) as it’s a hybrid of two pure breeds and not a new breed. It is, however, recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club, the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, the International Designer Canine Registry and the Designer Breed Registry.

Bernedoodle Breed Appearance

The appearance and characteristics of a Bernedoodle will depend on which breed parent’s genes are dominant.

If it’s the poodle, they’ll have dark, oval-shaped eyes and wide ears that hang close to the head, just below eye level. The head will be quite rounded with a long, straight muzzle. Their coats can be curly and dense or in tight cords of varying length. They come in a variety of colors including white, brown, black, cream and gray. The feet are small and the tail is carried high. 

You know there are three sizes of this breed (due to the three sizes of Poodle) — so, how big do Bernedoodles get?

A Toy Bernedoodle can range in size from 12 to 17 inches and weighs 10 to 24 lbs. A full grown Mini Bernedoodle can be anywhere from 18 to 22 inches and weighs 25 to 49 lbs. Meanwhile, a Standard Bernedoodle, full grown, can range from 23 to 29 inches and weigh between 70 to 90 lbs.

If the Bernese Mountain Dog is dominant, they’ll be on the taller side and the weight could be slightly higher than 90 lbs, reaching up to 120 lbs. They’ll have a longer, sturdier body. Eyes are dark brown and slightly oval eyes. Ears are triangular-shaped, rounded at the tip, set high and lie close to the head. Their head will be flat on top with a strong, straight muzzle.

The coat is tricolor with black as the base and markings in rich rust and clear white. The legs are strong and the tail is bushy, carried upward, sometimes with a slight swirl.

Bernedoodle Breed Maintenance

Are Bernedoodles hypoallergenic? While no breed of dog can ever be considered 100% hypoallergenic, thanks to its part-Poodle parentage, a Bernedoodle may shed very little. Shedding will certainly be minimal if they have a curly or wavy coat.

This can differ from dog to dog, though. If the Bernese Mountain Dog side is more prominent in a Bernedoodle, and it has a straight coat, it may shed more; something to be aware of if you have allergies.

They will require brushing once or twice a week, especially if they inherit their coat from the Bernese Mountain Dog. They’ll only need a bath when necessary. You should regularly clean their teeth and ears. 


Bernedoodle health

The Bernedoodle is a relatively healthy breed. But, as with all dogs, there are some health conditions you need to be particularly aware of. These include: 

  • Elbow Dysplasia 
  • Sebaceous Adenitis 
  • Hip Dysplasia

There is also a chance of cataracts, color dilution alopecia, hyperadrenocorticism and hypoadrenocorticism — although these are only minor concerns.  

Do you have insurance that would cover the cost of these conditions? You want to ensure you have the best cover for your Bernedoodle, so browse and compare top pet insurance providers to ensure you do.  

Elbow Dysplasia 

Elbow dysplasia is arthritis in the elbow. This is common in breeds including the Bernese Mountain Dog; they often get this in both elbows. You may notice they’re limping or their legs appear stiff. The treatment will depend on the severity, but it’s likely they’ll need surgery. 

Sebaceous Adenitis 

Sebaceous adenitis is a rare but hereditary skin disease. It’s an issue with the sebaceous glands which are found at the hair follicles. The result can be a significant hair loss and crusty, itchy skin. This is most common in the Standard Poodle and sadly, although you can treat it, there is no cure. 

Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is when the ball and socket rub and grind in the hip joint. This is an inherited condition that will become very painful for the dog and limit their movement. They may require surgery but changes to their diet, supplements and physiotherapy may help too.


Feeding a Bernedoodle — what’s the best diet? 

How much you feed a Bernedoodle puppy will depend on their size but it’s best to split it into three or four meals throughout the day. 

When you have an adult Bernedoodle, the amount you feed them will be dependent on whether they are a Toy, Mini or Standard. They can get stomach issues so you may want to continue giving them more frequent, but smaller, meals

Bernedoodles will benefit from vitamins and minerals to support their joints. 

It’s also important to note that they are prone to having a poultry allergy. You may want to avoid ingredients such as chicken or keep an eye on them if you do feed this so you can change their food should they have any issues. 

Need some help to ensure your pup is enjoying the best possible diet? Take a look at the advice from our trusted partner Dog Food Advisor, including the best dog food for Bernedoodles. 


Bernedoodle Temperament

Again, the temperament of your Bernedoodle will be dependent on which breed is dominant. 

On the whole, the Bernedoodle is a playful and affectionate breed. The Toy and Mini versions do tend to be a little more energetic and stubborn. This is something to be aware of when you’re training them. 

That being said, they’re a very intelligent dog, a character trait they get from both breeds.  

They generally get along well with children and other animals. They love to be with their families and need human interaction so don’t do well when left alone for long periods of time. This side of them tends to come from the Bernese Mountain Dog more than the Poodle. 

It’s important to socialize them while they are young as they can be wary around strangers.

They need a fair amount of exercise, especially if they get high-energy from the Poodle side. 

Bernedoodle Owner Experiences

Brooklyn
4 Months
2 People
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steal socks
Fetch
Play with Toys
Brooklyn is an F1 mini Bernadoodle and she weighs 18 pounds at 4 months old. She is very smart and loving. She loves to be with her people. She learns new tricks and commands fairly easily and is willing to train. She is very stubborn, which is a typical breed trait, but our trainer helped us with how to work through that and she really does want to please when she understands that it isn't optional. She potty trained really easily with very few accidents (we brought her home at 9 weeks). She doesn't tear things up, but will steal my socks when she wants me to chase her. I would recommend a Bernedoodle to a family. I do think training is important to work through the stubborn streak. But she has also done really well with boundaries with my 11 month old grandson that is at the house often, understanding not to jump on him. Puppies are a lot of work, but she has made it all a joy. Such a fun, lively personality.
1 year, 5 months ago
Harry
6 Months
1 People
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Playing in the snow
Sock Thief
Dog Parks
Hike
Tail chasing
Fetch
Harry is an F1 Mini Tri-Color Bernedoodle weighing 25lbs at 6months. Very affectionate, loves to cuddle and loves all humans and other pets, especially playing with young children. Highly intelligent yet very stubborn and won’t follow commands if a treat is not in hand. Strong chewer when bored, and no sock or tv remote is safe. The only animal I’ve know to love going to the vet. Hates baths.
2 years ago
Maggie
1 Year
2 People
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We love her so much but she’s definitely stubborn. She knows lots of tricks and learned quickly but it hard to reel in when she’s outdoors. Her recall is poor but I think it’s because she’s so excited to explore. She isn’t very cuddly and doesn’t like children (I think they move too quickly and scare her) but she runs up to every stranger at the dog park. She sheds a bit but I would say it’s quite low. Her hair is more straight to wavy.
2 years, 5 months ago
Mia
1 Year
6 People
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Mia is from utahbernedoodles. She is a f1 mini bernedoodle. She is sweet and loving
6 years ago
Mia
18 Months
5 People
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Mia is from Utahbernedoodles. She is the perfect example of what a mini bernedoodle should be.
5 years, 11 months ago
Dakota
6 Months
3 People
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Most affectionate dog I have had. Full of life and wants to be by your side always
5 years, 6 months ago
Millie
2 Months
4 People
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She is one of the best dogs I ever had I recommend a berniedoodle to family's with energetic kids I'm only 11 but I'm energetic...soooo I LOVE MYYYYYY DOOOOOOOOG.
4 years, 11 months ago
Lenny
1 Year
3 People
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Boat ride
Walk
Hike
Tug-of-war
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Lenny is an F1b mini Bernedoodle and weighs 20 pounds. He is such a sweet and snuggly boy who also has more energy than he knows what to do with. He requires an hour and a half of exercise daily, which he does over half himself by running in the yard and playing. He makes friends with dogs and people very easily and especially loves kids. Overall a perfect pup!
4 years, 4 months ago
Zorro
3 Months
2 People
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She is a lively poppy. She can stay alone far from us as long as she knows we are both in the house ❤️
4 years, 1 month ago
Dojo
3 Months
2 People
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Fetch
Cuddles
Rope toy tugging
He is amazing! He is so friendly and loving! He tolerates many situations very well. Training is fairly easy, especially with treats. A few minutes of running around in the yard a few times a day seems to be plenty for him. He fetches a stick for a while, then enjoys a good nap. House training was average, a few accidents can still happen but he's mostly good. He crate-trained VERY well, he whined for a few minutes the first few nights, and now he's silent all night. He does not bark and whine excessively, and he does not have a lot of anxiety and stress on average. We take him on many trips and he is very tolerant of many people and situations. He needs constant attention, but we are able to be there for him so it's ok for us. He loves everyone he meets! Grooming and shedding is minimal.
3 years, 10 months ago
Animal Expert Question Icon
Question - New pet
Question

We are looking at getting a puppy and trying to decide on the perfect breed. We have a 3.5 year old and 7 year old. We have .25 acres and we like to go hiking, exploring and camping. We would like to have a pup that doesn’t shed a lot. Daily walks would be fine, I work from home so it would have someone home daily. What breeds should we look at?

Answer
Hi there! Golden doodles or labradoodles are great with kids, love walking and exploring, and do not shed. I would look into getting one of these! Best of luck finding a new puppy!
3 years, 3 months ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
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