Chin-wa

Home > Dog Breeds > Chin-wa
4-7 lbs
7-10"
​United States
Chihuahua
Japanese Chin
Chi-Chin

The Chin-wa is a mix between a Japanese Chin and a Chihuahua so will take on characteristics of both parent breeds. Chin-wa dogs are small, toy breeds which are very social and love being around people. They are usually brown, red, cream, black, white, and grey and their coats can be short or long and straight. They don’t need a lot of grooming and don’t need to be brushed more than once a week. They also don’t need much exercise but do like to play. They can be stubborn when it comes to training. The breed can have ears that are erect or flop down.

Purpose
​Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Chihuahua, Japanese Chin

Chin-wa Health

Average Size
Height: 8-11 inches Weight: 4-8 lbs
Height: 7-10 inches Weight: 4-7 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Tracheal Collapse
  • Liver Shunts
Minor Concerns
  • Cataracts
  • Hypoglycemia
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Allergies
  • Heart Murmurs
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • Physical Examination
  • Blood Work
  • Ophthalmic Examination

Chin-wa Breed History

The Chin-wa is a combination of a Chihuahua and a Japanese Chin. The Chihuahua originated in Mexico and is the smallest breed of dog. The Toltecs who date back to the 9th Century had dogs called the Techichi and are believed to be the ancestors of the Chihuahua. The little dogs have been used as hot water bottles and were sold for food. It is believed the Chihuahua resulted from a cross of the Techichi with the small hairless dog brought from Asia to Alaska over what is now the Bering Strait. The American Kennel Club registered the breed in 1904. Despite its name, the earliest origins of the Japanese Chin are to be found in China, not Japan. Thought to have originated in the Chinese imperial court they were highly prized and often given as gifts. Some historians believe that the Pekingese, which also has his origins in China, was developed from the Japanese Chin, which are also known as Japanese Spaniels. The history of how the Chin made its way to Japan is not clear but the background on the breed shows that nobility in Japan prized the breed. Each noble house bred to their preferred standards. Because of this, there was a large variation in the eyes, coat, body size and temperament. When the Japanese Chin came to the Americas hundreds of years after its life in the households of the rich, the breed was in for a standardization. The common size was less than 10 pounds, with a broad head, large eyes and feathered ears. The facial markings of the Japanese Chin today are also very distinguished. They were officially entered into the American Kennel Club in 1888.

Chin-wa Breed Appearance

The Chin-wa is a mix between a Japanese Chin and a Chihuahua. They are toy breeds seldom weighing more than 8 pounds and are around 11 inches in height. They are usually brown, red, cream, black, white, and grey and their coats can be short or long and straight. The tail typically curls over the back of the dog. Eyes are often large as both the parent breeds are known for expressive eyes that dominate the face. The head is often apple shaped like the Chihuahua and can be adorned with ears that are more floppy like the Chin, or erect like the Chihuahua.

Eye Color Possibilities
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
Pied
Gray
White
Black
Cream
Red
Brown
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Chin-wa Breed Maintenance

Neither of the parent breeds is hypoallergenic so your Chin-wa will not be either, which is to be kept in mind if there are allergies in the family. Your pet needs moderate grooming to keep looking good and doesn’t shed much, although whether he has short or long hair will also affect this. Your pet should not need brushing more than once a week but it does stimulate the skin and keep the coat healthy when you do so. Smaller breeds can have issues with dentition and are prone to tooth decay; it is best to brush the teeth daily. Start when your Chin-wa is young and he will not mind the short cleaning routine at all. The same goes for the nails, trim them often and your hybrid will be used to the regimen.

Brushes for Chin-wa
Pin Brush
Slicker Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Daily Weekly Monthly

Chin-wa Temperament

A Chin-wa is likely to take on many of the traits of the parent breeds so is likely to be a great family pet, preferably with older children. He is alert and loyal and loves nothing more than being with the family so should not be left alone for any length of time. Because of their stubborn streak, the Chin-wa should go for training and socialization at an early age to prevent any problems forming later. The breed does not need a lot of exercise to stay fit and healthy but a walk twice a day for fresh air and play sessions, too will keep your pet happy and mentally stimulated. Happy to stay in an apartment, your hybrid will need to be taken out daily. They are lively dogs who quite enjoy performing tricks so this should be encouraged. They are good with other pets provided they are socialized early and make good pets for first time owners.

Chin-wa Activity Requirements

Your Chin-wa won’t need much exercise to keep happy and healthy but can bark if bored so it is important to take him for regular walks to the beach or dog park. This will also be good for socialization opportunities. They need to be walked on a leash as they are quite stubborn and won’t necessarily come when you call them. These dogs are very good for people living in apartments because they are happy with indoor play sessions and will enjoy playing with their toys. They don’t enjoy the cold so make sure they are warm in winter and not left outside for any length of time.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
5 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
30 minutes

Chin-wa Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$20 - $30

Chin-wa Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!