Beagle Chin

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United States
Beagle
Japanese Chin
The Beagle Chin is a small companion dog that was developed by crossing the Beagle, a rabbit tracking dog, with one of the royal lapdogs of China and Japan, the Japanese Chin. The result was a small, intelligent little dog with soft fur, big brown eyes, and a cheerful and loving temperament. These dogs make excellent companions for adults and for older children and they are amiable towards other pets as well. It is a rather small dog, however, and the Beagle Chin may be too delicate for younger children to manage properly as well as being prone to showing heightened aggression when faced with fear or injury.
Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Recent
Ancestry

Beagle Chin Breed History

The Beagle Chin designer dog, a hybrid cross between a Beagle, a tracking dog employed to track rabbits and hare, and a Japanese Chin, a small companion dog, was recently developed. The Beagle is a tracking dog that has been a popular breed both as a hunting companion and a family dog for several centuries, and it has been noted by name frequently in writings as early as the 15th century. The Beagle breed has changed a bit here and there since they were first developed however, including a period of time in which a tiny version of the Beagle known as a “Pocket” Beagle was bred. Breed standards for the Beagle were set in the late 1800s, around the same time that The Beagle Club of England and the National Beagle Club in the United States were being formed and it was first officially recognized in the Hound category by the American Kennel Club in 1885. Although the Pocket Beagle did not retain its popularity, the Beagle itself is still ranked as the fifth most popular by The American Kennel Club. The Japanese Chin is also an old breed, its origins hidden in myth and legend. The little dogs were prized by both Chinese and Japanese royalty, and when they were given as gifts to expeditionary forces in the mid-1850s they gained popularity in both England and the United States. These little dogs were recognized by The American Kennel Club in 1888 as the Japanese Spaniel and it wasn’t until 1977 that the name of the breed was formally changed to the Japanese Chin. The Beagle Chin is quieter than the average Beagle, making it more suitable to apartment living, and it is typically a sturdier animal than the purebred Japanese Chin, with fewer respiratory dysfunctions.

Beagle Chin Breed Appearance

The Beagle Chin is most often a small dog with a broad, slightly rounded head. The Beagle has a medium length square muzzle where the Japanese Chin’s muzzle is considerably shorter and wider. Although the muzzle for the Beagle Chin can resemble either the Beagle or the Chin muzzle, it most often ends up somewhere between the two, a square muzzle that is slightly shorter and broader than the Beagle with a somewhat flattened appearance. They have round brown eyes that are slightly on the larger side and give an impression of gentle curiosity and their ears can range from small, triangular ears that are set high on the head and flop forward to longer ears that are set well to the side of the head and hang down from there. As the Beagle has a short, double-layer weatherproof coat and the Japanese Chin sports a long, silky, single-layer coat, the hybrid of the two breeds can sport either coat, or anything in between, although the most common result is a rather short, straight, soft coat which may or may not have an undercoat.

Beagle Chin Breed Maintenance

Maintenance for this hybrid dog is a fairly easy affair. Bathing should only be required every few months, although due to the Beagle parentage, a doggy odor may be noticed if maintenance is not kept up. As both the Beagle and the Japanese Chin are moderate shedders, brushing the coat every few days is best in order to remove loose hair. Doing so will help to spread natural oils throughout the fur, keeping it healthy looking and also aiding in the avoidance of odor. With all dogs, dental care is essential and in this case, brushing the teeth a couple of times a week will keep tartar off of the teeth. The Beagle Chin will fare well with a checking of the ears on a regular basis, particularly if they fold down, trapping moisture inside.

Beagle Chin Activity Requirements

The Beagle Chin tends to be a friendly, gentle, and loving companion with a lively and playful nature. Although they are lively, they are not very active and do well with shorter bursts of exercise and activity. They are quite intelligent, and can be taught a number of commands and tricks, but they can also be easily bored and somewhat stubborn during training sessions so consistency, creativity, and patience are required to bring out this animal’s potential. If socialized early, they make excellent companions for both adults and older children, but due to their small size and their tendency to show increased levels of aggression when scared or injured, interactions with smaller children should be closely supervised. They are usually agreeable with other dogs and household pets although their Beagle natures may lead some of them to chase cats and smaller animals. The Beagle Chin should never be left outdoors without supervision or protection. Dogs this size can easily fall prey to wildlife and although the crossbreed is less likely than the Beagle to follow its nose into trouble, it is not unheard of.

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