Cavaton

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10-12 lbs
10-11"
United States
Cavalier King Charles
Coton de Tulear

The Cavaton began by crossing a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel with a Coton De Tulear dog. The result was a cute companion dog of small stature but with a big heart. They love people and long to please. The Cavaton can be a little sensitive in nature, so require gentle handling. They have a high level of energy so take them out daily for a walk. Not only will it wear some of that energy off, but it is a fantastic opportunity for them to socialise with other people and dogs. The Cavaton is typically sociable and trainable, and tend to love children and enjoy playing with them. If you have a house with a fenced yard, the Cavaton will enjoy going outside with you to play in the garden, and you can bet you will tire first from the games. These dogs like to be with their family, but you do need to train them to have good dog manners, and to accept that you are the pack leader, not them.

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, and Coton de Tulear

Cavaton Health

Average Size
Height: 11-12 inches Weight: 10-12 lbs
Height: 10-11 inches Weight: 10-12 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Syringomyelia
  • Mitral Valve Dysplasia
Minor Concerns
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Ear Infections such as Otitis interna/media
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • MRI
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Urinalysis
  • Blood Tests
  • Endocardiogram
  • Ocular Tests
  • Serum Chemistry Panel Tests
  • Ear Probe Examinations

Cavaton Breed History

The Cavaton owes its personality and appearance to its popular and good-looking parent breeds the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, and the Coton de Tulear dog. The Coton de Tulear originated on the island of Madagascar and is related to the Bischon Frise and the Maltese. They came to the Island of Madagascar several hundred years ago although no definite date can be sourced. The little white dogs were said to have accompanied ladies on long sea voyages, while some say that they were used as ratters on the ships. Some of the Coton de Tulear dogs became pets in the royal court and wealthy Madagascar households while others were street dogs. In the 1970s a Frenchman who was visiting the island brought some Cotons back to France and established them as a breed. They also were taken to North America around the same time. The Coton is still found in his native home, but his sweet loving personality has secured his place as a favourite throughout the world. He is registered with the American Kennel Club's Foundation Stock Service. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a descendent of the King Charles Spaniel. In the late 1600s the King Charles Spaniel was interbred with the Pug dog. This cross mix produced a smaller dog that had an upturned face, flatter nose, and large protruding eyes. They became the standard for the King Charles Spaniel. However, during 1920 an American named Rosewell Eldridge was keen to see dogs that were like the Van Dyck’s paintings of King Charles ll and his spaniels. Those dogs were without the Pug dog influence, so he offered prize money in the Crufts Dog Show in London to anyone who exhibited a King Charles dog with the long nose. Miss M. Walker won but unfortunately Eldridge had died and he was not there to award the prize personally. But thanks to other American breeders who embraced the idea they are responsible for the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel that we know today. From the royal houses to the American breeders, the Cavalier is a true heir of the royal Spaniels. In the 1940s, they were classified as a separate breed on their own, and were given the prefix Cavalier to differentiate them from their forebears. With such a colourful and romantic past the Cavaton could not be anything but the special little dog that it is today.

Cavaton Breed Appearance

The Cavaton dog is a real cutie, with a hard to resist engaging face, large round beguiling eyes and a button nose. Often it is hard to see the body shape under their fluffy coat, but they are well proportioned in the body but have short legs with rounded fluffy feet. The head is rounded with ears that are long and feathered. The face often has long eyebrows, and they have a medium length muzzle that meets in an even bite or could be slightly undershot. Their tail is often short with feathering or may be docked. The coat is part of what makes them so appealing, they look much like a cuddly toy rather than a dog. Combine that with their energetic nature and affectionate cuddles and you have a dog that fits right in with family life.

Eye Color Possibilities
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
White
Brown
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Cavaton Breed Maintenance

The Cavaton is not the easiest to maintain as far as coat care goes, but they are worth the effort. Their coat is usually like the Coton's – soft, curly and thick. But some dogs do inherit the Cavalier long silky coat. Either way, the coat needs to be brushed often, which helps prevent matted fur, and cuts down on the bathing required. When bathing, use a dog shampoo as human shampoo is too harsh. Ensure you dry your dog afterwards, checking the ears for any signs of infection which the long floppy ears are prone towards. Dental care and brushing, as well as nail clipping, will complete the grooming. If you start while your Cavaton is a puppy, he will grow up to love these grooming sessions. This will help in later life when he needs veterinary exams and other handling as a adult.

Brushes for Cavaton
Dematter
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Daily Weekly Monthly

Cavaton Temperament

The Cavaton is one happy little dog who loves just about anyone. They love to be with their family and will follow you from room to room to be with you. Although they are intelligent small dogs who can be trained, it is their focus that may try be a problem. They are almost so over keen to please you that they forget what you said as their focus shifts from one thing to another. But instead of getting frustrated, persevere and take it slowly, and just teach one thing per day rather than overwhelming your little companion. Once the Cavaton gets used to the training routine they will improve quicker as they realise what you require them to do. Give them lots of praise, petting and the occasional small treat as a reward for trying. The Cavaton loves children and will interact closely with them. They make good companions for single or the elderly, their antics will lighten any day. Their attractive good looks, sweet nature and beguiling large brown eyes will win over anybody, human or other pets. They are great in apartments as they are small and are not usually a yappy dog. They will need a daily walk or lots of play to release their pent-up energy. But usually bouncing around the house all day will take care of most of their activity needs.

Cavaton Activity Requirements

The Cavaton is a small dog, but has plenty of energy which is usually used up just bouncing around home and following you from room to room. They love games, and will play for as long as your stamina lasts. The Cavaton will enjoy being taken for a walk, where he can meet and greet other humans and dogs who he will expect to love him. This unique breed is very adaptable and will do just as well in a smaller home or an apartment. They can tolerate most climates but are inside dogs, they are not kennel dogs. Their goal in life is to be your constant companion and they will go out of their way to achieve just that.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
11 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
150 minutes

Cavaton Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$25 - $30

Cavaton Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!