American Alsatian

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85-110 lbs
25-28"
Southern California, USA
Alsatian Shepalute

The American Alsatian is a recently developed large-to-giant sized dog that is an attempt to create a larger sized dog specifically designed as a companion animal that also approximates the look and size of the extinct Dire Wolf. This breed is not recognized by any multibreed kennel club at this time and is not seeking recognition, as breeders are focusing on the consistent temperament and longevity of the breed before turning their attention to its appearance. At present the main focus is increasing the lifespan of these dogs to more closely match that of wolves living in captivity, around fifteen to twenty years; at this time the American Alsatian has a lifespan of twelve to fourteen years. 

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
1987/1988
Ancestry
Alaskan Malamute, German Shepherd, Pyrenean Mountain Dog, Anatolian Shepherd and Mastiff

American Alsatian Health

Average Size
Male American Alsatian size stats
Height: 26-32 inches Weight: 90-120 lbs
Female American Alsatian size stats
Height: 25-28 inches Weight: 85-110 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip And Elbow Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) or Bloat
Minor Concerns
  • Enlarged Heart
  • Food Allergies
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Epilepsy
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • Cardiac Ultrasound
  • Full Body Physical Examination
  • Allergy Testing

American Alsatian Breed History

Lois Denny, later to become Lois Schwarz, began to develop a dog breeding program in 1987 known as the Dire Wolf Program in order to develop a new breed of domestic dog that both resembled the wild look of the extinct Dire Wolf and had the proper temperament to make it an ideal companion animal. While the look of the Dire Wolf was the eventual goal for this breed, no wolves or wolf crosses were used in it’s development due to their less stable temperaments and she instead began crossing German Shepherds and Malamutes that were chosen specifically for intelligence, stability, and a tendency not to bark, later crossing the best of these dogs with a fawn colored English Mastiff to increase the overall size of the canine, resulting in a dog that was originally referred to as a Shepalute, or Alsatian Shepalute. By 2002 dogs that exhibited the proper temperament were breeding true and in 2006 a Great Pyrenees/Anatolian Shepherd selected for it’s size and and temperament was added into the mix as well. In 2010, the name was changed from the Alsatian Shepalute to the American Alsatian partially to avoid the implication that this is a “designer dog.” The American Alsatian has been increasing in popularity and newer breeders are continuing to work towards the goals originally outlined by Lois and have helped to improve the breed. Although no efforts have been made to add the breed to any multiple breed registries, slow and consistent progress has been made in efforts to perfect this new breed of dog. 

American Alsatian Breed Appearance

The American Alsatian, although smaller than the extinct Dire Wolf that it is meant to resemble, is still a very large dog; most of these canines measure more than two feet tall at the withers and weigh somewhere around a hundred pounds as adults. They are powerfully built with a broad chest, a thick neck, strong legs, and exceptionally large feet that give them extra stability, making them very sure-footed. Their backs are generally slightly longer than the dogs are tall giving them a rectangular profile and they have a large, slightly rounded skull that flattens out somewhat as it approaches the eyes. The substantial muzzle is slightly tapered and their almond-shaped eyes that can range from brown to yellow, although those that are closer to yellow are preferred. Their upright triangular ears are somewhat rounded at the tips and are generally wide set and shorter, and straight tails are preferred to longer or curled over tails. 

Eye Color Possibilities
brown American Alsatian eyes
Brown
amber American Alsatian eyes
Amber
Nose Color Possibilities
black American Alsatian nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
sable American Alsatian coat
Sable
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
American Alsatian straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

American Alsatian Breed Maintenance

The American Alsatian has been bred to have a low odor and their thick coat is quite effective at repelling dirt and debris, so bathing is only required on an occasional basis. The outer coat is somewhat coarse and moderate in length with an extremely thick undercoat that comes in for the winter months but is almost completely shed during the spring, reducing the undercoat to almost nothing. While this breed requires brushing every few days year-round to manage their moderate shedding, they will most likely need brushing daily if not more often when they are shedding their undercoat and will still generally leave a trail of hair. Care of the teeth and nails should be done on a consistent basis with the teeth needing brushing a few times a week and the nails requiring trimming monthly.

Brushes for American Alsatian
Pin Brush
Comb
Deshedder
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
American Alsatian requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

American Alsatian Temperament

Unlike most large dogs, the American Alsatian has been developed strictly as a companion animal. They prefer to be as close to their owner or family as possible at all times and are generally fairly tolerant of strangers and other animals, although some are more aloof, and a few have tended towards shyness, although this tendency is being addressed through conscientious breeding practices. While they are large dogs, they are very calm indoors and out and while canines and small children should always be closely supervised when interacting, these canines are typically quite trustworthy and not overly boisterous. Despite their size and the German Shepherd in their background, these dogs do not make good protection, guard, or watchdogs except by virtue of their wolf-like physical appearance. They were bred specifically to be on the quiet side and are more likely to cordially show a criminal around the property than to try and protect their territory. They do, however, make excellent therapy dogs due to their naturally accepting and mellow nature and a few have been trained for search and rescue work. 

American Alsatian Activity Requirements

While these dogs are not particularly energetic or active on their own, they do still need exercise to stay in peak condition and should have at least an hour of moderate activity each day. While they are not a particularly playful or energetic breed, they are generally well built and are capable of taking much longer walks if you prefer. They tend to thrive in many situations and can comfortably live in either a large home with a yard or a smaller apartment. While they are well-suited to colder climates due to their thick winter coats, they can be more susceptible to heat and should be closely monitored in warmer climates. 

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
7 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

American Alsatian Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
4.5 cups
Daily Cost
$3 - $3.5
Monthly Cost
$90 - $105

American Alsatian Height & Weight

6 Months
Male American Alsatian size stats at six months
Height: 23 inches Weight: 63 lbs
Female American Alsatian size stats at six months
Height: 21 inches Weight: 58 lbs
12 Months
Male American Alsatian size stats at 12 months
Height: 26 inches Weight: 89 lbs
Female American Alsatian size stats at 12 months
Height: 19 inches Weight: 83 lbs
18 Months
Male American Alsatian size stats at 18 months
Height: 27 inches Weight: 94 lbs
Female American Alsatian size stats at 18 months
Height: 20 inches Weight: 88 lbs

American Alsatian Owner Experiences

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Sketch of smiling australian shepherd