Weimardale

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55-65 lbs
23-26"
Unknown
Weimaraner
Airedale Terrier
The Weimardale is a hybrid dog. His parent breeds are the Weimaraner and the Airedale Terrier. Brave and intelligent, the Weimardale is a born hunter. He is a great dog for novice owners, and he is also great for families with children. He is not really suited to apartment living; he is happier in a home with a fenced-in yard for plenty of play. He is prone to chewing and digging, two natural Terrier habits. He may need moderate grooming to keep his coat looking clean and healthy. Overall, he is a wonderful addition to any family, and he is happiest when he is involved in family activities.
Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Weimaraner, Airedale Terrier

Weimardale Health

Average Size
Male Weimardale size stats
Height: 23-26 inches Weight: 55-65 lbs
Female Weimardale size stats
Height: 23-26 inches Weight: 55-65 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Distichiasis
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Von Willebrand's Disease
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Immune Mediated Anemia
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
  • Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) or Bloat
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Allergies
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Bleeding Disorders
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • Eye Examination
  • Allergy Tests
  • Full Body Physical Examination especially of the joints
  • Thyroid Panel
  • DNA for VWD

Weimardale Breed History

The Weimardale is a rather rare hybrid dog, and there is relatively little information regarding his development. In order to understand more about the history of the dog, it is important to study the origins of his parent breeds. The Airedale was first developed when a Rough-Coated Black and Tan Terrier was bred with an Otterhound. The purpose of this cross was to obtain a dog that could hunt rats and mice on land, but also hunt otters in the nearby rivers. This mating produced a dog that was able to swim and smell game both on land and in the water. At this time, the dog was known as the Waterside Terrier or Bingley Terrier. In 1879, a group of breeders met and agreed that the dog's name should be changed to the Airedale Terrier as tribute to the Aire Valley where the first development of the Terrier took place. The Airedale was a popular show dog for a number of years, and he became popular in England. During World War I, the Airedale served as a Red Cross dog, a messenger, a scout, and a number of other positions. Although it is not certain how the Airedale was brought to America, we do know that he was immensely popular. Presidents T. Roosevelt, Harding, and Coolidge all owned Airedales. The dog we know as the Weimaraner was developed during the nineteenth century in the Weimar area of Germany. The Weimaraner was an astute scent hound, was extremely intelligent, and agile to boot. He normally stayed close to the side of his human hunting partner, and he remained a faithful companion away from the hunt as well. In 1897, an exclusive club was created by Weimaraner owners; it is said that no one could own a Weimaraner unless he was a member of this club. In 1929, an American hunting enthusiast, Howard Knight, gained membership in the Weimaraner owners' club, and he purchased two Weimaraners that he took back to America with him. The Weimaraner Club of America was formed in 1942. The Weimaraner is also a presidential dog. President Eisenhower brought a Weimaraner to the White House for the duration of his stay there. 

Weimardale Breed Appearance

The Weimardale is a large dog. He weighs around sixty pounds at maturity. He is nearly two feet (at the shoulder) in height. Of course, his exact size is determined by his parent breeds, and the dominant parent's genetics. He may be a variety of colors. He may be tan with the Airedale's trademark black saddle back overlay. He may be gray, silver, black, fawn, or brindle. He is likely to have medium-length, wavy hair. It may or may not be coarse. He may have the characteristic beard of the Airedale parent breed. He is likely to have floppy ears which will need a little extra TLC. His tail is likely to be medium-length, and it is slightly curved at the end. His muzzle is likely to be elongated, and his nose will be black. He may have feathering on his legs, particularly on the lower half of the legs.
Eye Color Possibilities
hazel Weimardale eyes
Hazel
brown Weimardale eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Weimardale nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
fawn Weimardale coat
Fawn
brown Weimardale coat
Brown
black Weimardale coat
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Weimardale wavy coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Weimardale Breed Maintenance

The Weimardale will not require a great deal of maintenance. However, it is recommended that, as he is a large dog, you begin a grooming regimen with him at an early age so that he knows what to expect at grooming time. Brush him weekly in order to remove dead hair and dander. He does not shed very often, however. Brush his teeth two or three times a week in order to prevent the buildup of tartar and bad breath. If you want to prevent tooth decay and tooth loss though, brush his teeth daily. Trim his nails every two weeks  unless he wears them down on his own. Long nails are more prone to tearing and cracking, which can be painful for your dog.
Brushes for Weimardale
Pin Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Weimardale requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Weimardale Temperament

The Weimardale is a highly intelligent and courageous dog. He is good with all members of the family, but he is especially good with children. Some owners recount stories of Weimardales being highly protective of young charges. The Weimardale does not enjoy being alone; he is happiest when he is surrounded by his loving family. If his family is gone for long hours at a time, he may become prone to separation anxiety. This means his tendency to chew or dig may get him into trouble. For this issue, you may want to kennel train him. Get him accustomed to the kennel, place a few of his favorite toys inside the kennel, and he will begin to see that the kennel is a place of safety that belongs strictly to him. He gets along well with other dogs, but you will want to socialize him early to other types of pets. He is great for all types of owners, including those who are first-time dog owners.

Weimardale Activity Requirements

The Weimardale is a moderately active dog. He will need a half hour to forty-five minutes of play each day to maintain his happiness and health. He will enjoy trips to the dog park, and he will certainly enjoy the interaction with other dogs. He will also be happy to accompany you on brisk walks around the neighborhood. The Weimardale is a great swimmer, and he will happily take a plunge with you. Don't forget, however, that he is a hunter at his core. A Weimardale should never be left outdoors without supervision. He needs a fenced-in yard for outdoor play. While an electric fence may keep the Weimardale in his yard, this fence will not keep strange dogs out of this hybrid's territory. Your Weimardale will be happy to curl up with you at the end of the day.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
8 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes

Weimardale Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
Daily Cost
$1.5 - $1.9
Monthly Cost
$39 - $52

Weimardale Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Weimardale size stats at six months
Height: 12 inches Weight: 22 lbs
Female Weimardale size stats at six months
Height: 12 inches Weight: 22 lbs
12 Months
Male Weimardale size stats at 12 months
Height: 16 inches Weight: 35 lbs
Female Weimardale size stats at 12 months
Height: 16 inches Weight: 35 lbs
18 Months
Male Weimardale size stats at 18 months
Height: 19 inches Weight: 47 lbs
Female Weimardale size stats at 18 months
Height: 19 inches Weight: 47 lbs

Weimardale Owner Experiences

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