Australian Cattle

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31-35 lbs
17-19"
Australia
Queensland Heeler, Blue Heeler, Hall's Heeler

The Australian Cattle Dog dates back to the early 1800s when large amounts of land became available in Australia for raising cattle. The traditional herding breeds could not handle the cattle that were being raised in Australia and the need of a hardy, energetic and smart herding dog arose. The Australian Cattle Dog, while small in stature, is fearless when herding cattle and is well-suited for Australia’s rough terrain. This medium sized dog is high energy and loyal. They make a good family companion as long as their exercise requirements are met and they have a job to occupy their time.

Purpose
Cattle Droving
Date of Origin
1800s
Ancestry
Dingo

Australian Cattle Health

Sketch of Australian Cattle
Average Size
Male Australian Cattle size stats
Height: 18-20 inches Weight: 33-40 lbs
Female Australian Cattle size stats
Height: 17-19 inches Weight: 31-35 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Deafness
  • OCD
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Hip Dysplasia
Minor Concerns
  • Cataracts
  • Lens Luxation
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • Hearing

Australian Cattle Breed History

The Australian Cattle Dog originated when a cattle farmer named Thomas Hall from New South Wales cross bred dogs that were being used as drovers in Northumberland, possibly smooth coated collies, with tamed dingoes. The dogs that resulted from this cross breeding were named Halls Heelers. When Thomas Hall died in 1870, these dogs became available to other people besides the Hall family and their associates. These Halls Heelers have developed into two distinct breeds: the Australian Cattle Dog and the Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog. Robert Kaleski wrote the first published breed standard for the Australian Cattle Dog and greatly influenced the acceptable appearance and temperament of the breed. The standard has since been altered as the breed gained popularity and come into the United States in the mid-1900s. The Australian Cattle Dog is many times nicknamed as the Blue Heeler or the Red Heeler depending on the color of their coat. Dogs that were being bred in Queensland, Australia in the 1940s were shown to be successful as stud dogs and in conformation competitions. These dogs were called Queensland Heelers to differentiate them from the Australian Cattle Dogs that were being bred in New South Wales as many people thought the Queensland Heelers were better quality and produced better offspring. Today, the Australian Cattle Dog is still sometimes referred to as the Queensland Heeler. The American Kennel Club recognized the Australian Cattle Dog in 1980 as a member of the working group. It was not until 1983 that the Australian Cattle Dog was recognized as a herding breed by the American Kennel Club and moved into the herding group for competitive events.

Australian Cattle Breed Appearance

The Australian Cattle Dog is a compact, muscular dog that is both strong and agile. They have alert ears that stand up straight and a keen expression. These dogs must be well-conditioned and should never look delicate or cumbersome. They need to be able to perform the job of drover and have the ability to quickly move out of the way of the cattle. The Australian Cattle Dog comes in only two accepted coat colors: red or blue. From time to time a chocolate and cream coat color does occur. The blue Australian Cattle Dogs can be blue, blue speckled, or blue mottled with or without black, tan or white markings. The red Australian Cattle Dog should be evenly speckled with solid red markings. The Australian Cattle Dog is born white and their coloration becomes apparent as they grow, although any solid color on the face or body is present at birth. A mask must be present and can consist of a black patch over one or both eyes for the blue color or a red patch over one or both eyes for the red color. One eye patch is called a half or single mask and two eye patches is called a full or double mask. Dogs that do not have a mask are called plain faced.

Appearance of Australian Cattle
Eye Color Possibilities
blue Australian Cattle eyes
Blue
brown Australian Cattle eyes
Brown
amber Australian Cattle eyes
Amber
Nose Color Possibilities
black Australian Cattle nose
Black
brown Australian Cattle nose
Brown
Coat Color Possibilities
blue Australian Cattle coat
Blue
red Australian Cattle coat
Red
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Australian Cattle straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Australian Cattle Breed Maintenance

Many people call the Australian Cattle Dog a wash and wear dog since he requires very little grooming. They should be brushed once every 2-3 weeks with a natural bristle brush. When they come in from working with the cattle, a bath using a mild shampoo may be needed to remove caked on mud. Otherwise, wiping down with a moist cloth is acceptable. The Australian Cattle Dog does not shed his coat year round. For males and altered dogs they will shed their coat once a year. Intact females will blow their coat twice a year, usually following their heat cycles. When the Australian Cattle Dog is shedding, frequent brushing is recommended along with warm baths to help remove the loose hair. Regular nail trimmings should be done. Nail grinding can be done instead of cutting the nail to avoid cutting the nail too short and causing pain. Ears should be cleaned every 2-3 weeks to prevent infections.

Brushes for Australian Cattle
Slicker Brush
Deshedder
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Australian Cattle requires monthly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Australian Cattle Temperament

The Australian Cattle Dog is a high energy dog with an active mind and an independent nature. For many years, the Australian Cattle Dog has been ranked as one of the most intelligent dogs. Owners of an Australian Cattle Dog will need to provide plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. They are most happy when they have a job to do for you and do excellent in agility, herding, tricks and obedience. They are great for families that are active and are affectionate and loyal to their family. The Australian Cattle Dog is naturally cautious of new people and situations, making him a great guard dog when properly trained. He is a herding dog and will naturally try to herd children, cars and other animals. He will herd by nipping or biting at his quarry. If this behavior is allowed to occur, he can become a nuisance to his family. Proper training and consistency is important along with plenty of exercise and activities to keep their mind sharp. Australian Cattle Dogs are not barkers but will sound an alarm if strangers come near their property.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
14 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
90 minutes

Australian Cattle Popularity

Popularity ranking
#54
Popular Hybrids
Stump Double Cattle Dog
Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog
Australian Cattle
Stump Double Cattle Dog
Texas Heeler
Australian Shepherd
Australian Cattle
Texas Heeler

Australian Cattle Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
2.5 cups
Daily Cost
$1.2 - $1.4
Monthly Cost
$34 - $45

Australian Cattle Height & Weight

6 Months
Sketch of Australian Cattle at six months
Male Australian Cattle size stats at six months
Height: 14 inches Weight: 17 lbs
Female Australian Cattle size stats at six months
Height: 14 inches Weight: 16 lbs
12 Months
Sketch of Australian Cattle at 12 months
Male Australian Cattle size stats at 12 months
Height: 16 inches Weight: 27 lbs
Female Australian Cattle size stats at 12 months
Height: 16 inches Weight: 25 lbs
18 Months
Sketch of Australian Cattle at 18 months
Male Australian Cattle size stats at 18 months
Height: 19 inches Weight: 35 lbs
Female Australian Cattle size stats at 18 months
Height: 18 inches Weight: 31 lbs

Top Australian Cattle Breeders

Check out who made our list for the most reputable Australian Cattle breeders of 2018.
Top Australian Cattle breeder Timber Kennels
Timber Kennels
Sandersville, Georgia
Top Australian Cattle breeder Redfoot Australian Cattle Dogs
Redfoot Australian Cattle Dogs
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Top Australian Cattle breeder Sugar-n-Spice
Sugar-n-Spice
Goodyear, Arizona
Top Australian Cattle breeder Adams Ranch Australian Cattle Dog
Adams Ranch Australian Cattle Dog
Phelan, California
Top Australian Cattle breeder LnR Rig B Australian Cattle Dog
LnR Rig B Australian Cattle Dog
Escondido, California
Top Australian Cattle breeder Bar H Cattle Dogs
Bar H Cattle Dogs
Santa Ynez, California
Top Australian Cattle breeder Colbalt Kennels
Colbalt Kennels
Suisun City, California
Top Australian Cattle breeder Oakwood Austrailian Cattle Dogs
Oakwood Austrailian Cattle Dogs
Huffman, Texas
Top Australian Cattle breeder Katwala
Katwala
Saint Joseph, Illinois
Top Australian Cattle breeder Scrubby Creek
Scrubby Creek
Seven Lakes, North Carolina

Australian Cattle Owner Experiences

Cleo
9 Weeks
5 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
I have a 9 week ACD and she is the cutest she is teething and very energetic she loves peanut butter bones she already knows how to sit at 9 weeks and we are in the process of training lay down which we just started today and she is already very good. She is good with other dogs considering the fact that I did buy her at a pet store and she had siblings. Overall she is very obedient super sweet and energetic!!
2 months ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walk
I have walked a couple Australian Cattle dogs and they have had very different temperaments. Both dogs seemed highly intelligent and in tune with the feelings of their owners and/or walkers. One of the cattle dogs that I walked was extremely calm during the walk and never pulled away from you, but was a bit timid around other dogs and shy of going to the bathroom in front of you. The other dog I walked was very energetic and LOVED trying to chase after squirrels. Both seemed excited to go on their walks, and both warmed up quickly to me as their walker. Not even rain could get them down. Neither of them barked or behaved badly in any way, and played nicely with other dogs.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
1 Year
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
investigating
Tracking
Fetch
Hunt
Tug-of-war
sprint
I have worked with one Australian Cattle Dog, a male just barely over a year old. He was very easy to work with and trusted me as quickly as I came to find him charming, gentle and playful. He showed many signs typical of his breed: he loved exploring over a large square area, even at such a young age he was utterly courageous facing down traffic and yelping dogs in passing, and he had a clear capacity for high spirits. Cattle Dogs are comparable to Labs with regard to their keen sense for companionship, and they are known to hound out the outlines of many scents otherwise invisible to us. They love to sprint as well as maintain the leading pace of their walkers. Their sense of maturity and self-control is uncanny, a probable atavism of their ancestors who specialized in intermingling with multiple species of animals.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Australian Cattle dogs can be extremely defensive around strangers and also extremely sweet around people they know. Takaia, the four-year-old Australian Cattle dog I have walked several times, is always very friendly and sweet with me when I arrive at her house. She comes to greet me at the door but does not jump up on me or bark and is very patient while I put on her harness and leash. It seems like she has enough experience with Wag walkers to know that when someone comes to her house in the middle of the day when her owners are not home they are a friend coming to take her for a walk-- Australian Cattle dogs are very smart and learn things quickly! She also has lots of energy and loves to take long walks so the sight of her harness always makes her happy. Walking around the sometimes busy streets of Brooklyn, Takaia can get a little aggressive because of her instincts as a herder dog. She will sometimes bark or lunge at strangers on the street even if they're just walking quietly past us. She also sometimes lunges at pigeons and squirrels. She is generally a very fast walker and strong for her size, which can be difficult especially if you're walking in a crowded urban area. The Easy Walker harness really seems to help with both of these tendencies (and a Gentle Leader or another harness that attaches to the head would probably be even more effective). I also find that holding her very close to me in crowded areas reduces her tendency to snip at strangers as she can tell I will not let her get very far away from me even if she tries. She seems to love walking around the park near her house but she can get a bit aggressive with other dogs so I only take her there at times of day when there will not be many other dogs around. If we pass another dog, she will usually bark and pull towards the other dog until they are out of sight. Takaia is accustomed to living in the city and does not react to cars on the street, but my family's Australian Cattle dog, Xavier, lives in a rural area and will try to herd almost every car that passes our yard. This can cause him to bark and sometimes run out into the street, which can obviously be very dangerous to both him and the driver. Making sure an Australian Cattle dog gets lots and lots of exercise can help with this and make them less likely to try to herd everything in sight. Xavier loves to play fetch when he is off his leash and can run extremely fast. Playing fetch in an area where they have to run very far in between throws is a great way to tire them out. If they do not have experience with fetch, they can learn how to play very quickly. Both Xavier and Takaia absolutely love the snow and will always seek it out if it is only on the ground in some areas.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Sniffing
Walking
While only shy at first, William the Australian Cattle dog warmed up really quickly. He was extremely energetic but was a great listener and followed commands to a T. He walked very briskly and even jogged for quite a bit but it was hard to keep a steady pace due to him wanting to sniff each bush he came across! He posed well for pictures and was a very happy friendly dog.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Sniffing
Kisses
Walk
Australian Cattle dogs are sort of like the quintessential "dog" They're their owner's best friend and love doing all the typical dog activities like protecting their people and their home and chasing squirrels! I've walked an Australian Cattle dogs that was older and quite chubby and a little more on the lazy side and I've walked one that was spry and full of energy. As with most dogs, their behavior is all about their environment. These are great dogs to have around!
5 months, 3 weeks ago
8 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
sleep
Hike
Eating Snacks
The Australian Cattle dog I walk is originally from Colorado, thus adjusting to the city life is still a work in progress. She does not like to meet other dogs while we explore the streets, thus I have to keep an eye out to make sure we are not surprised by another dog. She also does not like to be led on a leash, as she was a free-range dog out west. This causes some issues, as she constantly wants to make her way back home. Her stubbornness can be controlled, however, by quick corrections meant to keep her moving and engaged for the entirety of the walk. Loud noises will also scare her to the point that she gets super anxious and wants nothing more than to be back home. When this happens, I make sure to have her sit and give her plenty of pets to calm her down. After a few minutes, she is usually good to go. Overall, she is a great dog who just isn't into the city life, which is completely understandable.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
10 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Agility training
Run
Walk
My cattle dog experience was wonderful. She is a gorgeous 10 year old, spayed, female. She is in great health and has a wonderful demeanor. She's very friendly with all other dogs and humans. She loves being chased and jumping around with other dogs. She is so happy to get love from strangers but loves her mother the most. She's incredibly loyal and aims to please every day. She's very trainable and incredibly smart. She only needs bathes periodically but otherwise doesn't require any grooming at all. She's calm and intuitive but gets very excited if you say her trigger words 'are you ready'. She's volunteered with senior citizens because she's so good natured and intelligent. I couldn't have asked for a better experience with her.
5 months, 4 weeks ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Running
Hiking
Playing fet
The one I have walked was shy and timid but he was also very smart and alert. He liked his treats and was pretty good with commands for the treats. He was very interested in other dogs and wild life. His eyes would light up with interest in little critters! Over all a good dog that was trained well.
5 months, 4 weeks ago
2 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Play
Walk
Australian Cattle dogs are an amazing breed of dog! They are literally one of the smartest breeds of dog that I have every worked with and they have a very particular personality that you need to be aware of when spending time with a Australian Cattle dog or if you are considering owning one for yourself.
5 months, 4 weeks ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Walk
Road trip
Such a fun breed! They are very smart and energetic. If they do not have an outlet for their energy they can be very destructive. Very sweet if they get their playtime in. Also, must keep their minds active since they are so smart.
5 months, 4 weeks ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Our Australian Cattle dog was incredibly aware and affection with our family- we was protective, but not aggressive. The cattle dogs I’ve known don’t always get a long with other dogs, but they are always intelligent, trainable, loyal, and cuddly. Cattle dogs need a lot of activity and mental stimulation, just like any herding breed. Sometimes can get nippy, as alluded to by their alternative name “blue heelers”- cattle dogs heard by nipping the heels of the animal they are flocking. Over all, great dogs
5 months, 4 weeks ago
6 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking
chasing squirrels
My experience with the Australian Cattle dog likely differs from most people for a multitude of reasons. Every week I have a recurring walk with two of them, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays To begin, unlike many dogs I've walked one of the two was abused. I did not get the full details so I do not know the extent of the abuse, as I assumed prying would maybe be an uncomfortable and invasive topic for their owner, but I know the girl dog, Lilo was stabbed. Due to the horrific abuse she endured she wasn't as trusting as most dogs I walk (understandably so). This affecting walking or even petting Lilo as she was unable to trust most people. Each time I come over for a walk she makes sure to cower under the table which can serve as problematic as I somethings have to crawl under the table and coax her out. Although she is a very skittish dog, Lilo has never displayed any outward signs of aggression like one may think she should. Stitch on the other hand is rather friendly. Initially he did take some time to warm up to me which is why I would rate the breed as 3/5 tails (I think that's what it is) in addition to Lilo not being super friendly so my opinions may be rather biased, however, once he did warm up he hasn't ceased to eagerly greet me at the door with a wagging tail (or stub in his case as he had it chopped). Also, from research I have read up on and by word of mouth I realize they do take a little bit of time to warm up to people. On our walks, I noticed neither dogs consistently pull but when either one gets spooked they do begin to run from the perceived threat. I also saw that both weren't neccisarily fans of other dogs, but were not outwardly aggressive. Overall the two are very sweet and loving dogs who've really helped me take a growing interest in the breed. I definitely would consider having one as a pet because they are energetic and could keep up on walks and in addition to that are beautiful dogs with unique markings and patterns. In addition to that, they would make a good pet for me simply because they do not shed much from what I have noticed, and definitely is manageable to keep up with.
5 months, 4 weeks ago
6 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking an Australian Cattle dog was awesome – I have walked them multiple times because I prefer to get some exercise with the dog during my walks. I can usually run and jog with this breed, so I always make sure I do not accept a walk with this breed of dog unless if I am ready to run and get a few miles of exercise. The first Australian Cattle dog I walked was lovely because she wanted to run, and I had planned to go to a nearby park, which was a great activity for the dog as well. This type of dog had high energy, was friendly, and she was very excited to go for a walk/run. I would recommend walkers to really keep in mind that this dog is not the type to simply "go for a stroll" with because it is important that this dog gets proper amounts of exercise and exposure to the outdoors. The dog loved to chase animals, such as squirrels in the park, and was very quick and strong as well when she wanted to go over to a certain area. I embrace every kind of dog, and am an advocate for playing with the dogs and making sure they have a good time on their walk, but walkers should be aware that these dogs are very playful and to accommodate their needs. Another Australian cattle dog I walked who was a boy really loved playing "fetch" in a nearby fenced in grass area, and he mingled well with other dogs. He was also an extremely friendly, smart, and playful pup. I think this type of dog could run around and play for hours because that was the experience I had on multiple occasions. Furthermore, this type of dog will need to be provided water during and after the walk because these dogs will get parches easily from running around so much and the active tendencies they have. I do remember that this particular dog had anxiety, which I do not believe is a characteristic of the breed, but rather because the dog was not used to the city yet. Once the dog was playing in the grass, he was not scared and wanted to play. I would recommend playing with a ball during a walk with this breed of dog because they love to run, jump, and attack items (stuffed animal toy would be good for playing with as well).
6 months ago
7 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
I owned an australian cattle dog growing up , and have a mix now and am very familiar with the breed. They are BEYOND smart, and i swear know english. They are also eager to please. If you need some one to talk to , I suggest finding an exciting Australian Cattle dog and they will bark and talk to you for as long as you want. ( very vocal) they are the referees of the dog park and makes sure that everyone is playing nice. so expressive! I love heelers!
6 months ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Playing
Herding
I have met lots of Blue Heelers and they are some of the smartest dogs I've ever encountered. I know one that has been trained to ride on the back of his owner's motorcycle (safely, as a trick only). They have always been very friendly to me and enjoy some rough play or chasing you. They do tend to bite ankles though if you let them chase. Herding instinct. They will usually pick up on any style of play/game. I enjoy hide and seek - i hide, dog seeks :D. Loves water and other dogs in my experience. Extremely loyal and trainable.
6 months ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Play
Walk
The Australian Cattle Dog is a very fun dog to walk with Wag. They are not difficult to take care of by a walker. They are always excited to go outside, since they are commonly found working outside on a farm. That being said, they are also great couch potatoes when not busy. Australian Cattle Dogs come in a couple colors, which is where they get the nicknames “Red” and “Blue” Heeler. That name also alludes to how well trained they can be. My most recent experience walking a Red Heeler with Wag was mostly positive. This particular pup would bark at other dogs and people. From personal experiences with multiple friends’ Australian Cattle Dogs in central Washington State, they are actually very affectionate towards other people and dogs when regularly exposed to them at young ages. As a result, they are extremely loyal. I would highly recommend requesting a walk if you see it is an Australian Cattle Dog!
6 months ago
9 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Australian Cattle dogs have energy for sure. They love to be active and sniff around wherever they can. They are very protective over their owners and require some warming up before they trust you. They are super loving and very sweet dogs though.
6 months ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Walk
Explore the city
The Australian Cattle is an extremely smart breed of dog. Their memory and directions are superb and they will lead you along the walk that they desire without getting lost. Their sense of smell is keen and they are determined to discover what they are seeking. They are an energetic dog that is strong and independent on walks. The dog I walk has a blue coat which is common in Australian Cattle dogs. I found that the australian cattle is very obedient and has a strong connection with the owner/walker. They will protect you from others and when walking like to be leading, but also close enough to guard you from a stranger. They often go between you and another person when you are meeting with another person. My experience with this dog is that they will lead you back home when they are complete with their walk and when I would continue the walk for time reasons, they would guide me back still. Very friendly breed of dog and will make sure you are safe during night walks. In my experience they are well trained and do not pull or run after other animals on walks. I would say this is a great dog for a young couple and would be safe for children.
6 months ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Walk
Fetch
Australian Cattle dogs are little bundles of energy! They are very enthusiastic, smart, driven and loyal. They definitely need good training because they are so smart- other wise they might take that energy out in less than constructive ways. They have spunky personalities, and, since they are herding dogs, boundless energy! They’re generally very good with other animals and kids, and can range in size. All the Australian Cattle dogs I have had and/or walked have been really into water. They have loved playing in it and swimming as much as possible. They are very curious, and can be a little mischievous, but they will love you more than anything else! They also love, LOVE to fetch and run, and might even bring you unusual fetch toys to keep the game going!
6 months ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Fetch
He was a very friendly dog, but not to the point of jumping all over me. He knew all of his commands very well, and was always eager to play fetch. He carried his ball around with him everywhere. I would consider him one of the smartest dogs I have ever walked or sat.
6 months ago
9 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Link, one of the Australian Cattle dogs I have had the pleasure of walking, is a bundle of sweetness and energy! He's such a smart dog and has great enthusiasm for life, and he does the command "sit" very well, especially if treats are involved! He would be a fun dog to "clicker" train, as he is highly intelligent and Australian Cattle dogs love to have a "job", since herding comes naturally to them. Occasionally, Link was a bit reactive to other dogs but probably because he wanted to boss them around. I think with patience and time, Link would “heel” very well, and training him for certain “jobs”, whether it be heeling, sitting, “staying”, and anything else, would be fantastic, as training any animals, especially dogs that are bred to “work”, is really great for them mentally, as it inspires them to be creative in order to get the “reward”, whether it is a treat or a toy, depending on what really motivates them. Eventually, those rewards can be phased out, of course, but I think Link wold have a lot of fun! I know a lot of people don’t necessarily have the time or inclination to train their pet, but what is really fascinating is that training an animal actually exhausts them mentally - think of how you felt when you were in college, or had to study for a big test, and how tired (and hungry!) that made you. The same goes for the dog (or any other animal) being trained. They have to get creative and with repetition, figure out the command along with the action, to get their reward. And it’s really neat because that is how subsequent skills and tricks are learned. Sit is the easiest because dogs do it all the time; down is the next easiest one. Then, you can add on from there to the point that, if your dog is agile, can do flips, jumps, and even push around a vacuum like those youtube videos we have all seen! So, going back to sweet Link, him and I have had a great time on the few walks I have done with him, and while I don’t spend time training him (other than asking him to sit for his photo and a treat), I know he would be a total delight to train. There is something about the spark in a dog’s eye - or any animal - when they start to get creative!
6 months ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Everything! These dogs do it all
These are probably one of my favorite breeds if not my number one. They are super companions. Very little aggression especially on the leash. I’m super athletic and these dogs can keep up with me and more, whether we’re hiking in the Santa Monica mountains, going to the beaches of SoCal or just letting them run free at the park. They love fetch and any shape size of a ball. They are super smart, fast, and full of love for people. Beautiful breed and if I get a dog any time in the future, I want an American cattle. They are my kind of dog. They train very well, and pick up on obedience training very quickly. They are jumpers, sprinters, and full of all kinds of tricks and stunts. An absolute awesome breed, that will stick around and give lots of doggy love and entertainment. They are also great with kids and protectors of their people. Their color tones of their fur is some of the prettiest I’ve seen for dog coats. They may even have mismatching eyes which makes them that much more beautiful.
6 months ago
1 Year
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Very sweet, hyper dog. Gets excited about other dogs and animals. Really wants to play. Listen to instructions, but needed to be corrected often. Super cute, great size.
6 months ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Each cattle dog I walk is always very protective of it’s home. They’ll eventually warm up to you but I’m always aware I’m walking into a gaurded space. Once outside on the walk they love to run. They love to play games. Fetching or hide and seek. They can be irritable when it comes to other dogs or they can be completely friendly. I’m always on alert while walking one, though they are very expressive and typically easy to read.
6 months ago
5 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Like many working dogs, the Australian Cattle Dog has high energy levels, an active mind, and a level of independence.[7] The breed ranks 10th in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, rated as one of the most intelligent dogs ranked by obedience command trainability.[8] The Cattle Dog needs plenty of exercise, companionship and a job to do, so a non-working dog might participate in dog sports, learning tricks, or other activities that engage its body and mind.[7]
6 months ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Walk
I walk two Australian Cattle dogs together, and they love to explore and sniff everything. They are not friendly with other dogs, so we keep our distance.
6 months ago
6 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking, playing fetch, head and belly pets
Very verbal, barks to say "hello", "feed me", stays close by your side. Typically reactive to other animal.
6 months ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
I have walked a couple of Australian cattle dogs. They were both quite affectionate. The owners left them in crates when they were away during the day. They were both really sweet and excited when I let them out. They were eager to go on their walk and were friendly with me from the beginning. They were a bit skittish with other dogs that we crossed paths with on the street. Not aggressive at all, just a bit weary. They walked at a good pace with me and didn’t pull. I love this breed. They seem mild mannered and just fun-loving!
6 months ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Hiking, Frisbee, and dog parks. Pulling a sled.
They are friendly and loyal companions. Not usually good with strangers but they warm up quickly. Harnesses that lead from the head are best for this breed, as they enjoy pulling against a harness or leash if given the opportunity.
6 months ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Running
Chase
Australian Cattle Dogs are some of the smartest dogs out there. They are able to learn quickly and are incredibly eager to please. Once you bond with an Australian Cattle Dog, there's no going back - they're your friend for life. It's really important to keep your ACD busy, as they tend to get bored quite easily. Frequent walks, enrichment toys, and antlers are all things that cattle dogs tend to enjoy. Should the Australian Cattle Dog become bored, they will likely become destructive. If you are looking for a dog who will stay by your side, the ACD is it!
6 months ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd