Cairmal

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10-15 lbs
10-13"
United States
Cairn Terrier
Maltese
Cairmal Terrier, Malticairn

The Cairmal is a hybrid mix of two small sized breeds, the Cairn Terrier, and toy-sized Maltese.  The designer Cairmal is bred for companionship from the working-class Cairn Terrier and the long-standing companion, the Maltese.  The resulting hybrid is an excellent companion for your home who is affectionate, alert, and cheerful.  The Cairmal is a dog-friendly mix who also gets along with cats very well.  Both parent breeds have a long history of development in their respective parts of the world but shared the same geographic space in Scotland starting in the 14th Century.  Details on the history and development of the Cairmal are limited since this mix is a recent designer dog.  Owners interested in determining possible traits and general health of the Cairmal should look to the parent breeds.  

Purpose
Companionship
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Cairn Terrier and Maltese

Cairmal Health

Average Size
Male Cairmal size stats
Height: 10-13 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Female Cairmal size stats
Height: 10-13 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Legg-Calve Perthes Disease
  • Testicular Tumors (males)
Minor Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma
  • Hypothyroidism
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Collapsed Trachea
  • Reverse Sneezing
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Physical Examination
  • Radiographs

Cairmal Breed History

The Cairmal is a hybrid mix of the Cairn Terrier and the Maltese.  The hybrid is a modern breed and does not have a history outside of its parent breeds.  Since there is no hybrid standard, your Cairmal may have the appearance of either parent breed as well as traits from both, and owners should review the respective histories to get a better understanding of the possible dispositions and traits of their Cairmal. The Cairn is an old and ancient breed of Scotch Terriers that was only developed as a separate breed in the 19th century and distinguished from its other Scotch Terrier brothers by coat color.  The ancestor of the Cairn Terrier, the Scotch Terrier, was first described in 55 BC by the Romans who identified the small dogs as agile hunters that went to the ground after their quarry.  The Romans named these dogs Terrarii, which is Latin for workers of the earth.  Over several centuries, the Terrier group lived and thrived as earth dogs in Scotland and England, making their way to France and parts of Germany as well.  By the 1900s, the Cairn Terrier was firmly established as a wire-haired small Terrier of the Skye group in various colors, accepting white, which was designated for its cousin breed, the West Highland Terrier.  The Cairn is often confused for the Scottish Terrier, but the Scottie has a more diverse genetic makeup, having a large gene pool history whereas the Cairn Terrier was limited the Isle of Skye.  The Cairn acquired its name from the stone moments of the same name the little Terrier was known to hunt. The Maltese has always been considered a companion breed and most likely developed in the Mediterranean.  Documentation on Maltese dogs is found in ancient civilizations, such as the Egyptians, Greek, and Romans.  The Maltese found its way west towards France in the 15th Century and was brought to England during the rule of King Henry VIII.  The Maltese became a favorite of noble and royal women, such as Queen Elizabeth I, Queen Mary of Scots, and Queen Victoria.  The Maltese is thought to originate from a Spitz-type dog but was developed into the Modern-day Maltese we know today by English breeders. 

Cairmal Breed Appearance

The Cairmal is a small to medium-sized hybrid between the Cairn Terrier and the Maltese.  Your Cairmal will develop characteristics resembling the Cairn Terrier with a wiry coat in any color.  Both parent breeds are small dogs, and the Cairmal will maintain a small dog appearance as well.  The eyes on a Cairmal are small and set wide apart, and the ears are semi-erect and triangular shaped.  The nose on a Cairmal is typically black, and dark masks and points can adorn this hybrid's head.  The tail on a Cairmal is not too long and sits level with the back but is carried straight up, like the Cairn Terrier parent.         

Nose Color Possibilities
black Cairmal nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
black Cairmal coat
Black
white Cairmal coat
White
cream Cairmal coat
Cream
silver Cairmal coat
Silver
red Cairmal coat
Red
brindle Cairmal coat
Brindle
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Cairmal wiry coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Cairmal Breed Maintenance

The Cairmal is not a hypoallergenic dog but still does not shed much at all.  However, the longer hair requires daily brushing to prevent tangles and mats.  The Maltese parent also has issues with tear staining and lighter colored Cairmals may need their eyes cleaned to prevent staining as well.  Once stained, the discoloration is permanent on the hair.  Long hair on and around the ears may attract and trap dirt and debris.  Regular ear cleaning with a veterinarian approved solution will help prevent ear infections in your Cairmal. The Cairmal is not known to drool much, and regular brushing will help remove dirt and debris from its coat.  A clean coat and clean ears will help prevent any "doggy" smell, though this little mix is not known the smell either.  Cairmals, depending on which parent breed they more resemble, can have medium to high energy and require daily exercise of moderate intensity.  They are smart and eager to please as well, which makes them easy to train. 

Brushes for Cairmal
Deshedder
Scissors
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Cairmal requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Cairmal Temperament

The Cairmal is an excellent companion dog with a cheerful, affectionate disposition.  This little dog takes on the personalities for both parent breeds and is spirited and full of energy.  The Cairmal is affectionate toward its family including children, but the Maltese parent may make child tolerance slightly more challenging.  Proper socialization with kids and teaching children how to respect and play with the Cairmal will make living together much easier.  When it comes to strangers, this little breed is not a big fan and will be leery and alert. Every dog is different, and your Cairmal may or may not tolerate other dogs and pets well.  Proper socialization at a young age and continued socialization with other dogs and pets will help your Cairmal adjust to life with other pets.  

Cairmal Activity Requirements

The Cairmal has a lot of energy and needs daily exercise, but the intensity of exercise does not have to be great.  The Cairmal is capable of meeting enough exercise requirements indoors and does not need long, purposeful exercise outside.  However, a small yard is perfect as well. If properly exercised, your Cairmal will be easy to keep inside and is well suited for apartment living.  The Cairn Terrier is known to dig and root around; so proper exercise and mental stimulation is a must to prevent destructive behaviors in your Cairmal.  Daily playtime and exercise also strengthens your bond and keeps the Cairmal's mind properly stimulated.    

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
6 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
30 minutes

Cairmal Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$20 - $30

Cairmal Owner Experiences

Benji
4 Years
3 People
Condo
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
From my personal experience these dog are highly active low maintenance and stay healthy for a very long tine
3 weeks, 6 days ago
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