Newfypoo

85-100 lbs
21-24"
United States
Newfoundland
Poodle
Newdle, Newfydoodle, Newfydoo, Newfoundlandpoo, Newfoundlandoodle, and Poofoundland,

The Newfypoo — also known as the Poofoundland, the Newfydoodle, and the Newdle — is a cross between the Newfoundland and the Poodle. Known for their high intelligence and good natures, these gentle giants get along with both people and other animals, making them a wonderful family pet. 

In this guide to the Newfypoo, you’ll learn:

  • This dog is a cross between the Newfoundland and Poodle 
  • The Newfypoo is a large breed, sometimes even considered giant 
  • They’re a gentle and friendly breed; the Newfypoo is good with children and animals 
  • This crossbreed is protective and eager to please but can get separation anxiety 

Newfypoo breed overview

This hybrid is a combination of the Poodle, a highly intelligent retrieving dog and the water-loving, good-natured, giant dog breed known affectionately as the ‘Newfie.’ Mixing the two together has created a calm and friendly crossbreed. 

If you’ve been looking at Newfypoo puppies and would like to welcome one into your home, then you’re looking at paying anywhere from $500 to $2,000, from a reputable breeder. Their gender can determine the price, with females often being more expensive. The Mini Newfypoo — a miniature version of this giant breed — tends to be much more expensive too. 

The life expectancy of a Newfypoo is up to 12 years which is typical for a breed of this size. It is, however, shorter than the Poodle which has been known to live up to 18 years and slightly longer than the Newfoundland which is closer to 10 years.

There’s a lot to think about when you get a dog and in all the excitement you don’t want to forget about insurance. It’s quick and easy to browse and compare the best pet insurance plans so you have peace of mind your pup is covered for any unexpected health issues. 


purpose Purpose
Companion, Watchdog
history Date of Origin
Unknown
ancestry Ancestry
Newfoundland and Poodle

Newfypoo Health

Average Size
Male Newfypoo size stats
Height: 22-25 inches Weight: 95-110 lbs
Female Newfypoo size stats
Height: 21-24 inches Weight: 85-100 lbs

Newfypoo Breed History


Newfypoos are a fairly new hybrid that’s believed to have developed in the USA in the either the 1990s or the early 2000s.  

The Poodle, on the other hand, is one of the oldest known dog breeds. They originated in Germany in the 15th century but soon became very popular and were further developed in France. They come in three sizes: Standard, Toy and Miniature.

The Standard was used for duck hunting, the Miniature for finding truffles and the Toy was a companion for nobility. They were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1887.

The Newfoundland breed was first developed on Newfoundland Island in Canada. It’s believed this was in the 16th century. At this time they were working companions to the fishermen of Newfoundland. They’re also well known for rescuing the survivors of shipwrecks by dragging them back to shore. The breed was further refined once they arrived in England in the 1880s. They were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1886. 

The Newfypoo may be new but they’re gaining popularity fairly quickly. While they aren’t recognized by the American Kennel Club, they are recognized by the Dog Registry of America and the International Designer Canine Registry. 


Newfypoo Breed Appearance


This hybrid is a large to giant breed. A full grown Newfypoo can reach heights of 25 inches and weigh up to 110lb. There’s also a Mini Newfypoo which will be around 18 to 21 inches and weigh 35 to 65 pounds. 

Some Newfypoos may inherit the thinner head and tapered muzzle of the Poodle. Others may have the blocky head and deep muzzle of the Newfoundland. However, most Newfypoos are likely to have heads that are fairly wide, but not quite blocky, with a long, straight muzzle that is broad but not as deep as the Newfoundland. 

Their small to medium-sized eyes are usually oval-shaped and can be dark brown to amber, although darker eyes are more common than lighter eyes. That said, Poodles are sometimes born with blue or gray eyes and although most darken as they mature, a few will remain lighter. This may be passed on to the Newfypoo. 

They may have rounded triangular ears like the Newfoundland which fold forward from high up on the side of the skull or the longer drop ears like those situated lower on the head of the Poodle. 

Most Newfypoos have a dense, curly coat that can be either single or double layered. They may be hypoallergenic like the Poodle but you’re unlikely to know this for sure until they’ve matured. This can come in a variety of colors; the most common are black, brown, gray or a mix of all three. 


Similar breeds to the Newfypoo

Not sure a Newfypoo is right for you? What about one of the two dogs that form this mixed breed: 


You might also like to consider similar sized breeds, including: 


Alternatively, there are other popular breeds mixed with the Poodle, such as: 


Whether you choose a Newfypoo, Poodle or Newfoundland one of your top priorities should be looking after their health. 

Compare pet insurance plans to ensure you are covered should any unexpected health issues arise and sign up to a wellness plan so you know their basic health needs are covered. 


https://wagwalking.com/wag-wellness/wellness-plansso you know their basic health needs are covered. 

Newfypoo Breed Maintenance


It’s likely you’ll need to brush your Newfypoo daily to prevent matting and to remove any loose hair or debris. This is because the coat of the Newfoundland is known to be a magnet for dirt and debris, and the coat of the Poodle may require frequent trimming or clipping due to its continual growth.

They’ll only need a bath every couple of months unless they have rolled in something smelly. The folded down or hanging ears of the Newfypoo should also be checked on a regular basis to ensure that they are clean and dry. You should also trim their nails and brush their teeth regularly. 


Newfypoo health

The Newfypoo can develop health issues from both parent breeds — here are some of the  health conditions you need to be aware of. 

  • Cataracts 
  • Canine Hip Dysplasia 
  • Sebaceous Adenitis 
  • Subaortic Stenosis 
  • Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) or Bloat

There’s also a chance of entropion, ectropion, cherry eye, retinal dysplasia, pemphigus foliaceus, glaucoma, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and mitral valve dysplasia — although these are considered only minor concerns.  

As there are a number of health conditions your Newfypoo can get, it’s important to have a good insurance policy. Browse and compare top pet insurance providers to find the best option for you and your dog. 


Cataracts 

Cataracts is one of the most common eye problems in dogs and particularly common in the Miniature and Standard Poodle. It can occur in one or both eyes and happens when the lens of the eye is unable to hydrate properly, which makes it become cloudy. This can result in complete loss of vision and, if you don’t get it treated, it can lead to glaucoma. The only treatment is surgery. 


Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD)

Hip dysplasia can happen in one of both hip joints. It’s an inherited condition that can occur at any age. It happens when the ball and socket haven't formed properly, so they rub and grind together rather than gliding smoothly. This will restrict the dogs movement and be very painful for them. Treatment might include oral supplements, physiotherapy or surgery.  


Sebaceous Adenitis 

Sebaceous adenitis is most common in the Standard Poodle. It’s a rare but hereditary skin disease that can be treated but sadly has no cure. It occurs when there is an issue with the sebaceous glands which are found at the hair follicles. The result can be crusty, itchy skin and significant hair loss. This usually starts at the head and neck. 


Subaortic Stenosis 

Subaortic stenosis usually affects larger breeds and one of the breeds most commonly affected is the Newfoundland. This is typically discovered at birth but is likely to get worse as the dog gets older. It’s caused by the narrowing of the outlet in the heart, under the aortic valve.

The heart has to work harder and as a result strain is put on the cardiovascular system. Symptoms include difficulty breathing, fainting, and lethargy. Surgery may be required but medication such as beta blockers is likely to be prescribed first. 


Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) or Bloat

Bloat or Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) tends to affect larger dogs with the Standard Poodle being one of the breeds most at risk. It means the stomach has dilated and potentially even rotated. The risk of bloating increases with age.

Symptoms to look out for include a bloated abdomen, stretching frequently, a fast heart rate and breathing rapidly. As soon as you suspect this you need to get your pup to the vet because this can progress very quickly and is life-threatening. lean and dry. You should also trim their nails and brush their teeth regularly. 


Feeding a Newfypoo — what’s the best diet? 

Your Newfypoo dog needs to be fed with food that’s specifically formulated for large to giant breeds. Due to their size they’ll eat a large amount of food. Make sure they have a healthy diet with food that’s rich in protein. Food high in calcium will help to prevent issues with their bones. It’s beneficial for them to have wet food, although this can be mixed with dry food. 

As mentioned, this crossbreed can develop bloat. To decrease the risk you should avoid exercising them straight after they have eaten. You may also want to use a slow feeder to encourage them to eat slowly and you could elevate their bowls off the floor. A diet that is low in sodium can also help to prevent heart problems such as subaortic stenosis that this crossbreed is prone to. 

Newfypoo puppies should be fed up to four times a day and this can then be reduced to three times a day for adults. Due to the risk of bloat, it’s better to serve several smaller meals rather than a couple of larger meals. Treats are beneficial, especially when training — but keep an eye on how much you are giving them. 

Wondering what to feed your Newfypoo? Take a look at the advice from our friends at Dog Food Advisor, including the best dog food for Poodles and the best large breed dog food.

Newfypoo Temperament



The Newfypoo is a friendly and playful breed. Known for having a big heart and a protective nature, they get along well with both people and other animals including dogs. However, as with all dogs, it’s important to socialize them from a young age to prevent any chance of dominant behavior or aggression. 

These dogs are typically very gentle with children. However, all interactions should be supervised to ensure the safety for both the dog and child. It’s also important to remember that this is a large breed — especially a full grown Newfypoo — and so you should be particularly careful around smaller children. Newfypoos are too large to live in small spaces like an apartment — they’ll be happier in a larger home with a yard to play in.

The Newfypoo may also inherit an increased need for companionship from both parent breeds. If left alone for too long they could become anxious and destructive. 

This crossbreed is eager to please which can make training them fairly easy — although a few treats and plenty of praise won’t hurt either. 

Newfypoo Activity Requirements


This breed is a fairly active dog and will need around an hour of exercise per day. Your Newfypoo will love coming out on a walk or jog with you but enjoy other physical activities too such as swimming.

As a large breed it’s important to remember not to overdo it when they’re still growing as this can have a detrimental effect on their developing bones and joints. 

Like both the Poodle and the Newfoundland, this crossbreed needs mental stimulation. It is just as important for their health and well-being as physical exercise. 


Newfypoo Owner Experiences

Seven
5 Months
5 People
Apartment
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walk
Dog Parks
I’m having lots of problems with him jumping and biting at five months old .
2 years, 5 months ago
Black Betty
10 Weeks
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
She’s been sick since I got her here
5 years, 9 months ago
Jackson
9 Weeks
5 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Playing outside
He is the best puppy I've had in a long time. We also have a great Dane and she is a great dog but there is no compairing their two personalities. He ((newfypoo)) is really out going and loves everyone.
5 years, 7 months ago
Tucker
17 Months
1 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Dog Parks
I call him my gentle giant. He loves people and is very affectionate. He just doesn't realize how big he is!
5 years ago
Paisley
5 Months
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Chase
Fetch
Swim
Walk
Paisley is a drooling, water-loving, lap sitting cuddle bug! She loves to play but after a few rounds will plop down for a break. She is affectionate, aims to please, and wants to be everyone's best friend.
4 years, 3 months ago
brutus
8 Months
8 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
He is awesome but very lively. He still has the jumping habit which needs to stop but no more mouthing.
4 years, 2 months ago
Boris
28 Months
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walking
Napping
Snack Eating
Cuddling
Boris is the sweetest boy and whilst he is a family dog (supposedly) he does love me more. He can be a handful when he goes on strike during a walk and has my husband lifting him into the car. Boris loves everyone and wants everyone to love him. He loves a cuddle and a snack at night as he sits on the sofa for the evening.
3 years, 6 months ago
Jackson "Jax"
6 Months
5 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
great dog! loving, affectionate, and VERY easy to train!
3 years, 5 months ago
Max
3 Months
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walks and playing fetch
Max has been great. He is truly part of the family. Max was easy to train and a quick learner. He is growing quickly and doesn’t realize how big he is. He loves everything and everyone.
3 years, 2 months ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd