Weim-Pei

60-65 lbs
20-22"
Unknown
Weimaraner
Chinese Shar-Pei
The Weim-Pei is a hybrid dog. His parent breeds are the Weimaraner and a Chinese Shar-pei. He is a large dog, and he generally inherits the wrinkles of the Shar-Pei parent breed. Early socialization is highly recommended with the Weim-Pei. He is a wonderful watchdog, always alerting his owner to anything amiss in his territory. He will need little in the way of maintenance; however, his wrinkles will need special attention. He does not do well when separated from his owners for a great deal of time. He does best when he spends the proper amount of time around his loving family. The Weim-Pei is not recommended for novice dog owners.
Purpose
Companion, Watchdog
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Weimaraner, Chinese Shar-Pei

Weim-Pei Health

Average Size
Male Weim-Pei size stats
Height: 22-23 inches Weight: 65-70 lbs
Female Weim-Pei size stats
Height: 20-22 inches Weight: 60-65 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) or Bloat
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Skin Problems
  • Mast Cell Tumors
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Demodectic Mange
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • Skin Evaluation
  • Full Body Physical Examination especially of the joints

Weim-Pei Breed History

The Weim-Pei is a rather rare hybrid breed. Because of this, little is known about how the hybrid came to be. In order to learn more about the Weim-Pei, it is a good idea to study the parent breeds. The Weimaraner was developed in the Weimar area of Germany during the nineteenth century. He was able to scent well, was highly intelligent, and was incredibly agile. Unlike many hunting dogs, the Weimaraner was more inclined to stay close to his human hunting partner. He also proved a great companion away from the hunt as well. In 1897, the first Weimaraner club was organized for those who owned the breed. For a short period of time, a person could not own a Weimaraner unless he belonged to the club. It is believed that several breeds were combined to create the Weimaraner as we know it: the Bloodhound, the English Pointer, the German Shorthaired Pointer, the Great Dane, and the silver Huehnerhund. The first Weimaraners arrived in America around 1929 when American sportsman Howard Knight brought a pair to the United States. In 1942, the Weimaraner Club of America was established, and during that same year, the American Kennel Club officially recognized the Weimaraner. The Chinese Shar-Pei is thought to be an ancient breed; his likeness is depicted in artwork dating as far back as 206 B.C. He is thought to be a descendant of the Chow-Chow due to his characteristic blue-black tongue. The Shar-Pei was used as a guard dog, in hunting, for hunting vermin, and in herding livestock. The Chinese believed his wrinkles and dark mouth warded off evil spirits, and his endurance was appreciated by his handlers. He was able to work all day alongside his human counterparts. At one time, the Shar-Pei faced extinction. However, in 1992, the Chinese Shar-Pei was officially recognized by the American Kennel Club, and the breed became popular. 

Weim-Pei Breed Appearance

The Weim-Pei is a large, somewhat formidable dog. He often has the wrinkles of the Chinese Shar-Pei parent; however, his wrinkles are not as pronounced as that of the Shar-Pei. His head will be large and broad. Generally his ears will be floppy (this will require a little extra maintenance). His snout will be long, and he may have a red, brown, or black nose. His chest will be deep and broad. His overall body will be muscular. At maturity, he will weigh about sixty pounds. His eyes may be blue, green or brown. His tail will be of medium length, and it will generally curl over his back. His paws are large and powerful. He may have black around his muzzle. He may be a variety of colors, depending upon the dominant parent breed. He may be a fawn or red color. He may be a silver or blue color. He may also be a chocolate brown color. Again, this is largely dependent upon the dominant parent breed.
Eye Color Possibilities
blue Weim-Pei eyes
Blue
hazel Weim-Pei eyes
Hazel
brown Weim-Pei eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Weim-Pei nose
Black
brown Weim-Pei nose
Brown
isabella Weim-Pei nose
Isabella
Coat Color Possibilities
blue Weim-Pei coat
Blue
silver Weim-Pei coat
Silver
brindle Weim-Pei coat
Brindle
red Weim-Pei coat
Red
brown Weim-Pei coat
Brown
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Weim-Pei straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Weim-Pei Breed Maintenance

The Weim-Pei is a relatively low-maintenance dog. However, as the Chinese Shar-Pei parent breed is sensitive to touch (and the Weim-Pei offspring might inherit this characteristic), it is a good idea to begin grooming the Weim-Pei at an early age. You will need to pay special attention to his wrinkles. You will need to wipe his wrinkles out two or three times and week. Be sure to make sure the skin between the wrinkles is dry. Use a damp cotton ball to wipe out his ears once a week. At this time, check his ears for odor and redness. If these are present, this could be indicative of an ear infection. Brush him monthly to loosen and remove dead hair. Brush his teeth daily to prevent tooth decay, tartar build-up, and bad breath. Trim his nails every two weeks or so unless he wears them down on his own.
Brushes for Weim-Pei
Slicker Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Weim-Pei requires monthly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Weim-Pei Temperament

The Weim-Pei is smart and lovable, but he is also highly guarded. He does not readily welcome strangers. He is highly protective of his family. Often, he will choose one person to bond with, and, while he may tolerate other members of the family, this one person will definitely be his favorite. He is very alert to his surroundings, and he is quick to let you know if something is amiss in his territory. The Weim-Pei can be somewhat headstrong. Obedience classes might be a good idea. He is not recommended for those who are not accustomed to dealing with a headstrong dog. The Weim-Pei must know that you are the "alpha" in the relationship, otherwise he is likely to try to take the alpha position. He is good with children, although it is recommended that you socialize him from an early age. Unfortunately, he is not recommended for living with other dogs and pets.

Weim-Pei Activity Requirements

The Weim-Pei is not an overly active dog, but he will require a moderate amount of activity to remain healthy and happy. Until you have your Weim-Pei completely trained, a trip to the dog park might not be the best idea, although he will enjoy accompanying you during brisk walks in the neighborhood. He will also make a great running partner on the jogging trail. He will enjoy time in a fenced-in area of the yard. However, do not allow him to stay outside alone for long periods of time. Also, remember, unless you live in an area with few neighbors, you will not want to allow the Weim-Pei to run free. An underground fence is also not a good idea for the Weim-Pei. He will defend his territory, and, if other dogs enter the yard, he may do whatever he feels is best to protect his turf. He is a hunter at heart, and, left to his own devices, he may run after smaller prey.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
9 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

Weim-Pei Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
Daily Cost
$1.50 - $1.90
Monthly Cost
$39.00 - $52.00

Weim-Pei Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Weim-Pei size stats at six months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 32 lbs
Female Weim-Pei size stats at six months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 32 lbs
12 Months
Male Weim-Pei size stats at 12 months
Height: 15 inches Weight: 47 lbs
Female Weim-Pei size stats at 12 months
Height: 15 inches Weight: 42 lbs
18 Months
Male Weim-Pei size stats at 18 months
Height: 18 inches Weight: 57 lbs
Female Weim-Pei size stats at 18 months
Height: 18 inches Weight: 57 lbs

Weim-Pei Owner Experiences

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