Bracco Italiano

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55-88 lbs
22-34"
Italy
Italian Pointer

The Bracco Italiano is one of Italy’s two native hunting dogs; the other hunting dog is the Spinone Italiano. The Bracco Italiano loves to hunt and is still used by many avid hunters in Italy. He can be a great family companion when he is given plenty of time to run and play. He is generally friendly with everyone, including strangers. The Bracco Italiano has excellent scenting and retrieving capabilities, this makes him a great candidate for dog sports such as agility, tracking, rally and nose work. He is also good at performing search and rescue and therapy work.  The Bracco Italiano should not be left to his own devices, he can become a nuisance barker or destructive. 

Purpose
gun dog
Date of Origin
ancient times
Ancestry
pointer

Bracco Italiano Health

Average Size
Height: 23-36 inches Weight: 55-88 lbs
Height: 22-34 inches Weight: 55-88 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip And Elbow Dysplasia
  • Kidney Problems
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Ectropion
  • Bloat
Occasional Tests
  • Blood And Urine Protein Screens
  • X-Rays
  • Eye Examination
  • Physical Examination
  • Blood Tests for Organ Function

Bracco Italiano Breed History

Many believe the Bracco Italiano has ancestry that dates back to the 4th and 5th centuries where he can be seen in paintings. Other paintings dating back to the 14th century also showed dogs that resembled the Bracco Italiano. The exact lineage of the Bracco Italiano is unable to be traced back this far. It is speculated that the orange and white Bracco Italiano originated in the Piedmont and the brown and roan Bracco Italiano may have originated from Lombardy. The orange and white variety was used to hunt in very mountainous terrain. These dogs were built lighter so they can easily move through the rough terrain with ease. The brown and roan variety were heavier boned and worked mainly in the marshy lowlands. He became a very popular hunting dog for noble families such as Gonzaga and Medici. He was used to drive game into nets and to flush prey for falconers. Once firearms were introduced to hunting, the Bracco Italiano was used to point and retrieve game. He is considered to be an ancestor of many European pointing breeds because the Bracco Italiano was given as gifts to European nobility. The Bracco Italiano faced a decline in popularity by the early 20th century. The breed was revived by an Italian breeder, Ferdinando Delor de Ferrabouc, along with the Societa Amatori Bracco Italiano. The two varieties were crossbred to increase genetic diversity. The official breed standard was adopted in 1949 and in 1956 the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) officially accepted the breed. The United Kennel Club recognized the Bracco Italiano in 2006. In 2007, the Bracco Italiano Club of America was formed and in 2010 he was approved to compete in American Kennel Club performance and companion events.

Bracco Italiano Breed Appearance

The Bracco Italiano should appear strong and well muscled. His skin must be tough but also elasticized, with the skin being thinner on the head, throat, armpits, groin and belly. His coat is short and dense. The hair is shorter and finer on his head, ears and front of his legs. His coat should be glossy and should never appear flat or lackluster. He can be found in four different colors: white, orange & white, chestnut & white, and amber & white. The chestnut color is preferably a warm shade and reminiscent of a monk’s robes. He can have speckling on his white called melato or roano-marrone. When he has roano-marrone, a metallic sheen should be present on his coat. His mucous membranes must be similar in color to his coat but should never have any black. The mucous membranes on his mouth should be pink. The Bracco Italiano typically has a facial mask that white, a symmetrical mask is preferred.

Bracco Italiano Breed Maintenance

The Bracco Italiano does require weekly grooming to remove any dead hairs and dirt. He does shed moderately because his hair is so dense. But since his hair is short, the coat that is being shed tends to float through the air and gather or furniture and clothing when he is not kept groomed. Use a stiff, natural bristle brush that will help remove the dirt and hair. To keep his coat looking shiny, a leave-in conditioner can be applied or a finishing spray that is approved for dogs. He does have strong nails that grow quickly and he will need regular nail trimming. Check his nails every week or every other week and clip them as needed. A nail grinder can be used to avoid splitting or cracking of the nails during clipping. His ears need to be checked weekly and cleaned as needed. A routine dental plan needs to be established to keep his teeth and gums healthy and strong.

Bracco Italiano Temperament

The Bracco Italiano is a reliable, hardy hunting dog who can also become a wonderful family companion. He needs a family that understands he needs daily exercise and he still has a high instinct for flushing out prey. He does require a sturdy fence to keep him contained. Since he is a hunting breed, he can be efficient and methodical in his daily interactions with his family. He loves human companionship and is very devoted to his family. He will be somewhat wary of strangers, but overall is accepting of most everyone. He does require early socialization to ensure he is accepting of all people. Generally, he does well with other dogs but should be watched around cats and other small pets. He is wonderful with children, but does expect children to respect his space. He should not be left alone with toddlers or children who do not fully respect him. 

Bracco Italiano Owner Experiences