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What is Acute Liver Failure?

Because the liver is necessary for life, cats who have acute liver failure can have a variety of different organ systems that are affected by the condition, putting the cat at risk of death.

Acute liver failure, also known as hepatic failure, occurs when the cat's liver suddenly loses 75 percent or more of its function. It differs from chronic liver failure in that it is not due to a hepatic disease or related condition that slowly causes it to lose function over time. The condition occurs due to severe liver necrosis (death).

Acute Liver Failure Average Cost

From 339 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$1,000

Symptoms of Acute Liver Failure in Cats

Acute liver failure affects several organ systems, which include the gastrointestinal tract, renal system, the liver and gallbladder (hepatobiliary system), nervous system, and the blood (hematologic system). Because of the widespread effect, symptoms can present throughout the entire body. These symptoms include:

  • Sudden weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the mucous membranes, eyes, and inner ears)
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood in stool
  • Seizures
  • Swollen abdomen due to fluid
  • Depression
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Causes of Acute Liver Failure in Cats

Determining the cause of acute liver failure is essential in stopping tissue death. These causes include:

  • Hepatotoxic drugs, including some antibiotics, analgesics, chemotherapy agents, and anesthetics
  • Infectious agents, such as leptospirosis
  • Biologic toxins, which include Amanita phalloides mushrooms
  • Heat stroke
  • Inability to breathe (hypoxia)
  • Excessive exposure to heat during hyperthermia cancer treatment or excessive time spent outdoors
  • Poor flow of fluids into liver (perfusion)
  • Blood clot disease
  • Shock
  • Acute circulatory failure
  • Problems with protein synthesis due to a metabolic disorder
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Diagnosis of Acute Liver Failure in Cats

The veterinarian will need to know all of the cat's symptoms, how long symptoms have been present and the cat's complete health history. The veterinarian will examine the cat, looking for signs of jaundice and abdominal distention. 

Several labs will be taken. These will include a complete blood count, a biochemical profile and a urinalysis. These tests will determine if an infection is present that is causing the liver problems, what other organ systems are being affected, protein synthesis impairment, abnormally high liver enzyme activity and the presence of bilirubin in the urine. 

Though all of these tests can indicate acute liver failure, a biopsy will be necessary to obtain a definitive diagnosis and to determine why the liver is failing. The veterinarian will take a small sample of the liver either using an ultrasound-guided needle aspiration or during surgery. This sample will be sent to a lab for analysis.

X-rays and ultrasounds may also be performed in order to look for liver enlargement and other hepatic abnormalities. 

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Treatment of Acute Liver Failure in Cats

Fluid Therapy

The cat will be given fluids intravenously in order to prevent dehydration. Electrolytes and intravenous dextrose (sugar) will also be administered to correct any electrolyte imbalances and low blood sugar levels.

Feeding Tube

The veterinarian will place the cat on a special diet that will be given to the cat through a feeding tube. The feeding tube may either be inserted through the nose or directly into the esophagus through a small incision in the cat's neck. The tube will deliver calories, protein and nutrients directly to the stomach or intestines. The diet will be high in protein with vitamins E and K to promote healing and prevent blood clots from occurring.

Medications

A variety of complications can occur throughout the body as a result of acute liver failure. Medications will be prescribed both to treat these complications and to treat the primary cause of the liver failure. These medications include:

  • Antioxidants to promote healing
  • Hepatoprotectants to prevent additional damage to the liver
  • Antiemetics to treat vomiting and nausea
  • Antibiotics to kill bacteria or infections in the liver or other organs
  • Diuretics to help remove excess fluid from the body
  • Mannitol to decrease cerebral (brain) swelling
  • Lactulose to stop the absorption of ammonia
  • Antiulcer medications to treat ulcers
  • Coagulopathy medications to help the blood clot to prevent internal bleeding
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Recovery of Acute Liver Failure in Cats

The cat will need to follow the prescribed diet once at home to ensure the liver continues to heal and that the cat is getting all of the nutrients it requires. Any medications that were prescribed by the veterinarian will need to be taken according to the instructions given in the hospital. When the primary cause is diagnosed and treated within a few days of liver failure, the prognosis is good. 

The cat will need to regularly follow up with the veterinarian in order for labs to be drawn to check on liver function and to ensure that all other organ systems have healed from the liver failure. Any complications that occurred due to the liver failure will also need to be followed up on a regular basis.

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Acute Liver Failure Average Cost

From 339 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$1,000

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Acute Liver Failure Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

dog-name-icon

Link

dog-breed-icon

Maine Coon

dog-age-icon

2 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Lack Of Appetite

My two year old cat was diagnosed with liver problems. It's been about 2 months now. I only have seen him get better but moving around now and trying to play with his toy. He had been on lots of meds and had a feeding tub in his neck now for about a month. I don't now what else to do to make him want to eat on his own. I have tried baby food, cooked chicken, cant kitten food and canned a/d food that vet gave me. He is donning inn his own and will go smell the food but will not eat it. What can i do for him? I'm starting to worry he will have a feeding tube for a long long time. And about two days ago he is starting to get distant again. What can i do for him.

June 3, 2018

Link's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

Link may need to have his blood values rechecked to make sure that his liver disease is resolving and that things are getting better. It can be challenging to get a cat to start eating again when they have a feeding tube, as they usually really aren't hungry since we are feeding them. If his bloodwork is better, and he is otherwise healthy when seen by your veterinarian, you can start to increase the amount of times between feedings to try and create times when he is hungry. Your veterinarian can guide you through that in more detail, as they can examine him and know more about his physical condition.

June 3, 2018

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Toby

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Domestic short

dog-age-icon

13 Years

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Serious severity

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2 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Jaundice, Liver Lvls, Wght Loss

My DSH is a senior, at least 13, but perhaps more like 15 or 16 since it was ultimately a guess. I used to work at a vet hospital for several years and had hoped he might be a little older before seeing a decline. In any case, he had elevated liver values when we did bloodwork prior to a scheduled dental cleaning about a year ago. They were not so elevated as to leap immediately into every diagnosis/treatment option that is out there, especially since I am on a budget. At the time we tested his thyroid, since sometimes that can evbe associated. Those values were normal, and I honestly feel guilty now, but his eating and weight were good and so was his activity, so I waited before pursuing further diagnosis. In about February or March of this year when we went for his annual, his liver values were extremely elevated from the last test and the vet realized how jaundiced he had become. He is a white and strawberry cat and she told me how difficult it is to tell with his coloring but I can't help burr be sad that I didn't see ir earlier. We started him on denamarin after that visit because I didn't feel like a biopsy was the right next step when there could be potential blood clotting issues and couldn't afford the ultrasound. He has seem to do well until only the last day or two. Now some of his habits have changed suddenly. He is hiding a lot and crying at the front door. Just today though, I found a food that he really seems to enjoy and I was hoping that that would perk him up a little bit. And I also got pedialyte to be sure they he is staying well hydrated. I guess my ultimate question is this - I understand he is very close to his end of life but I just wanna do everything I can to make him comfortable and happy. I know it wont cure him but I am also wondering if making sure that he has better nutrition can even make him more comfortable now. Is it hopeless thinking those changes might make even a couple of days happier and more comfortable?

June 2, 2018

Toby's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

Liver disease in cats is very difficult to treat, and one of the hardest parts is getting them to eat enough when they don't feel good. Some cats benefit from a feeding tube if the chances for recovery are good, but at Toby's age, I would be concerned that his chances for recovery are poor and I'm not sure that I would put him through extraordinary measures. At this point, it seems making sure that he is comfortable and has a good quality of life is very important, and anything that he will eat is better than not eating. I am sorry that that is happening to him.

June 2, 2018

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Tiger

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tabby

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2 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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Mild severity

Has Symptoms

No Symptoms

My cat was a baby ferral when I got him. He is 2 now. No shots yet. He was sick with infection from a cat bite. Hes on antibiotics and is really strong now. Vet says he may have liver problems due to yellowing skin and gums. He was rechecked and his gums are whitish not yellow. How much will it cost me to neuter him, immunizations, blood work and hospitalization. I love my cat but I am low income now.

May 9, 2018

Tiger's Owner

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recommendation-ribbon

3320 Recommendations

Without knowing where you live (country, state, city etc…) it is difficult to say what a possible price for neutering, vaccinations and blood tests would cost. Neutering may cost $300 or more but some cities have organisations which may neuter cats for $25 (see first link below for an example), vaccinations may cost $100-$150 and blood tests may cost $200 or more; it would be best to contact a local Veterinarian for a ballpark over the phone or a charity clinic like the one in the first link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.helpinghandsvetva.com/procedures-pricing/ www.businessinsider.com/how-much-it-actually-costs-to-own-a-cat-2015-8

May 10, 2018

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snowie

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Mix

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4 Years

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Moderate severity

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1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Loss Of Appetite

There is a stray cat in the neighbourhood which we feed him everyday. Last week we noticed he was very thin and loss of appetite and we took him to the vet and he was on drip and gave him some vitamins. We took him back and kept him inside and he had not eaten anything, we kept him inside for roughly a week and the vet told us to release him outside to be in his environment. After 3 days without seeing him he came back and went in my garage and remained there. He drinks a bit but he did not touch any food. Yesterday we took him to a different vet for a second opinion and told that there is no chance and better to be put down and was diagonised with Liver Failure like the previous vet. Today in the morning he began meawing and walked and miracously ate a small portion. Shall I wait a bit ? Because we do not want to be put down but we are afraid that he is suffering

May 2, 2018

snowie's Owner


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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

If Snowie started eating today, it would be a great idea to see if he continues to eat, that would be quite amazing. Some causes of liver failure are reversible, and you just don't want him to suffer, in the big picture. If he seems brighter and might be improving, it would make sense to give him a chance. The chances are slim that he will survive, and you will need to monitor him to make sure that he isn't suffering, but some stray cats are fighters!

May 2, 2018

In the evening he ate a bigger portion and today in the morning he ate a small amount and he is walking a little distance. It seems that he is a little better. Thank you for your advice and yes we are monitoring him and keeping him in our care. Thank you

May 3, 2018

snowie's Owner

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Chloe

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Calico

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16 Years

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Serious severity

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Liver Failure

Hello, My 16 year old cat, Chloe, has been diagnosed with end stage liver failure and early renal failure. This has all happened within the past 3 weeks. I was wondering if there is a general time frame in which (not to sound uncaring or hard-hearted) in which liver failure usually causes death when untreated. We are not really sure why she has gone into liver failure. We noticed her weight loss after she had lost a pretty substantial amount of weight (for her, probably 3-5 lbs, and I know that is alot but cats tend to hide when they are sick pretty well and she also has a very long coat). We took her and our other cat (who also had a long coat but tended to run on the skinny side all of his life (19 years) to the vet and they ran blood work and determined that she is in acute liver failure with early signs of renal failure. I am doing the best I can to try and give her the best possible time she has left (homemade bone broth from pasture raised organic chickens, making the areas that she spends the most time in warm and comfortable, moving food and water to those areas, and also a make shift litter box so she doesn't have to go as far to where the normal box is kept). My vet says that she is not in any pain with liver failure but she is so weak and sunken in. I have read that seizures can come along with renal failure as the toxins build up in their bodies and I just don't want her to suffer or be in any kind of pain or anxiety. I just want to do the best I can for her, for the time that she has left. I have been trying to figure out just how much time that might be. Any help and suggestions for care and "compassionate care" (I don't like the term PTS but I'm also very aware of where we are headed) is greatly appreciated.

April 25, 2018

Chloe's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

I'm so sorry that that is happening to Chloe. I wish that I had better news, but with liver and kidney failure, time is probably short. It is difficult for me to assess her quality of life without seeing her, but if she is still eating and relatively comfortable, you may have a little time left. Normally with both of those diseases, appetite is one of the first things to go. It would be a good idea to discuss her quality of life with your veterinarian, as they have seen her, and can help guide you as to whether she is comfortable, or when she is suffering. I am sorry, again, that this is happening to her.

April 25, 2018

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Orlando

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long hair

dog-age-icon

12 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Critical severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Critical severity

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Jaundice
Lethargy
Vomiting

My boy Orlando, he's around 12 years old now. Several years ago, I'd say 2015/2016 he stopped eating and lost a substantial amount of weight. I took him to the vet and they told me it was hepatic lipidosis. He was given IV fluids, antibiotics, vitamins, and antioxidants. I followed up with his vet for several weeks after force feeding him, he eventually came around and was back to his normal self. Then in 2017 it happened again, after hurricane Harvey he was stressed and when I took him back to his vet I was once again told he had hepatic lipidosis. At a loss, I did the same thing as last time only he didnt get better. The last option from the vet was to give him steroids, and to my excitement it worked! He was back to his usual self in no time. But once again, his liver is shutting down and I'm devastated. I took him back and the vet told me he probably would not survive since his liver has been damaged so many times. It's been a few weeks with no real improvements, he's barely drinkng and not really eating much of anything. He is still being his loving self, but I'm not sure how much longer he will live at this point. How do I know if he's suffering and in pain? I couldn't bare it if he was in pain. I just don't know what to do at this point, if I should let him be until he passes or have him euthanized so he won't suffer. 😔

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JB

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Grey cat domestic

dog-age-icon

18 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Critical severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Critical severity

Has Symptoms

Jaundice
Yellow Skin
High Bilirubin
Jaundice Liver Fail
Went Downh
Dewormer

Hi Iv just been through all the above x I can relate to everything however my cat was grieving we lost her mum 2 weeks ago so he stopped eating. He’s been a bit off for a few months before I had most his teeth removed this time last year . My cat went downhill on Monday & Tuesday spent a day in vets but not overnight Had ahad FBC. Done his bilirubin was so high & liver 1000!! the He went on fluids etc . He went all of a sudden worse at home sick , drooling I tried putting food near him He would gag and Syria fed water and fed him mixed cat good with water he immediately threw it back up . He was so jaundice it happened so fast he was in liver failure. He wouldn’t move all night & was sick in the night and his back legs went when he would try and walk . He was so weak he starved himself, but I could see how sick he was!! my vet didn’t send me home with any anti sickness ?!! He rapid went worse Wednesday it was cruel to watch him suffer I had to take my baby to be PTS absolutely gutted he was a kitten when I got him, 18 grey cat. The only thing I think could of contributed to this raised liver was I wormed him a week before he got bad, Dronspot! I’m blaming myself now that this made him sick & drooling gagging and weight loss drastic & feel awful , his liver count was 1000! I’m going to investigate this to see if this contributes to my beautiful boys death Sharon x

dog-name-icon

Panther

dog-breed-icon

Cat

dog-age-icon

7 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Jaundice
Loss Of Appetite, Weight Loss
Jaundice, Weight Loss

my kitten was only 7 months old and out of no where ended up really sick! he stopped eating and in just a few days lost so much weight, he was very larthargic his coat was greasy and messy he couldn't walk so we took him to the vet and we ended up having to leave him over night so he could get iv treatment and seizure meds cause just before we brought him to the vet he had a really bad seizure!! So he spent the night but unfortunately he didn't make it through the night. He had really bad jaundice and his bilirubin was really high!! We are all still in shock because it happened so fast and and the strangest part of it all is he was a very healthy kitten!! So we are just so confused as to how this happened to him

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Beau

dog-breed-icon

Blue Russian

dog-age-icon

7 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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2 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Depression
Weight Loss
Jaundice
Lethargy
Vomiting
Not Eating
Enlarged Liver
Nausea
Inappetence
High Bilirubin
Blood Isn'T Clotting

Similar to one of the posts below, "Rocky" our cat, Beau is a similar age (7) – she's a pretty small cat but lost quite a bit of weight for how small she is (about 2lbs), but was relatively acting normal just maybe a bit more lethargic looking back on it. We noticed she wasn't eating that much or anything at all and she had a similar greasy fur look to what Rocky's description had mentioned. We also noticed that she was throwing up what seemed to be like a white saliva foam of sorts. Two months prior she had her annual check up where everything was all good minus that her teeth were showing signs of severe dental disease and that she was 9lb's and shouldn't gain any more weight for her size. They quoted me that it was going to be upwards of $1,000 to get her teeth cleaned and any teeth removed since they put pets under anesthesia during the whole process. With this said, I was bummed and had quite the sticker shock, but started saving up and looking around at other good practices for lower quotes. We live in a city so the cost of living is pretty damn high and veterinarian's are generally costly as well. I was considering pet insurance and was actively looking into it for awhile, but didn't end up going forward with it because I've heard this, that, and the other thing that its a rip off. Whatever, I wish I did it though. So nonetheless, I was thinking that oh man I wonder if she's not eating because of her teeth? We got her into the vet and she diagnosed her with Jaundice – shes a grey cat so I didn't really notice the yellowing, but now I do. Her blood tests showed her bilirubin levels were super high and that something was up with her liver or one of her organs in that general area. She sent us immediately to the ER for ultrasounds and further testing to find out what was going on. Get this, her teeth are looking great??? But, good thing I saved up at least. We get to the ER and are told that she would get the ultrasound tomorrow morning since it was about 8pm at the time and the vet who does it had already left. They put her on an IV and catheter and monitor through the night until they did the ultrasound the next day. From it, they figured out her liver was swollen and yellowish, but could not distinguish the exact root of what was causing it. So they wanted to do a deeper look into her liver with microscopic evaluation (forgetting the actual term for it). The procedure would only be done if they could tell if she was clotting properly because like humans, when the liver is functioning properly there can be problems with clotting and they didn't want to run the risk of any internal bleeding. So, they run the first of coagulation tests after giving her K vitamins (which support coagulation) – comes back that she is still not clotting normally. She stays over at the hospital and they try again in the morning. Unfortunately, the same situation and they suggested we try giving her a Plasma-Blood Transfusion or they treat what they can treat, but we run the risk of not knowing what specifically is going on. The vet told us it could be anything from liver disease/ fatty liver disease, a liver infection, or liver cancer – which we were told is very fatal and even if she threw ever treatment, drug, everything she had it would be only a matter of months that she could live :(. The test was highly suggested so the doctor could help hone in as to what is actually causing this and how we go about treatment. Many $$$$$$ later, we went forth with the transfusion which in a series of unfortunate events we are told that it did not work and that she would require a new one. News to me in general that cats have a blood bank – makes total sense when you think of it, but it's also coming from other cats which means not a whole lot of blood. To make matters more scary, our cat has only had a small bit to eat for now almost 2 days which was mainly encouraged by an appetite stimulant, but then they needed her to have an empty stomach so they could do the procedure with anesthesia. Emotionally speaking, me and my partner are devastated, complete hot messes (especially me since I've had her since she was a kitten when I was in college) and have been through the whole duration so scared about losing her – she's truly the best and worth every penny if it means she can fight this. We were given the decision on whether we get her on antibiotics and treat the treatable (which could work if its not cancer) or try again the next day arrival they immediately. After consulting both the ER vet and her primary vet, we went ahead and got her started on the treatment in the hopes she would get better and we could test her blood potentially later on and get the procedure done. Long story short, Beau was dispatched after almost three days in the hospital with stable vital signs, with instructions to give her whatever food her heart desires to coax her to eat and a whole slewwww of meds etc. They go as follows: - Clavamox: antibiotic in case of infectious causes of liver disease - Marbofloxacin: antibiotic in case of infectious causes of liver disease - Vitakin K1: antibiotic for liver disease and to get her blood to clot - Denamarin: liver support drug - Maropitant (Cerenia): for anti-nausea, inappetence, or mild vomiting. - Mirataz: a transdermal appetite stimulant. It's been about two and a half days since she's been home. We've never given her meds in the past so they suggested we get them compounded so that they taste like chicken and aren't so much liquid especially if she doesn't like the pills. Figured out very quickly that she just hyper salivates and drools the meds out so we got the pill versions to try out for a week to see if thats any better. It's been an interesting endeavor to say the least. We've watched multiple tutorials on how to do it properly and even have been using a pill popper to get them down. She hates it. Like, hates it. And we feel absolutely horrible because she's already under so much stress and it's a relative fight to get her to swallow both the liquid and the pills. To top it off, she has to take six meds a day and the Mirataz stuff on her ear. She's been pretty cuddly and will go on bouts of scratching stuff like her normal self which has been amazing, but she's still pretty lethargic and sleepy a lot of the time. We've put out I feel like everything under the sun when it comes to food. So far the only thing thing she will nibble on are a few Greenies treats on occasion when she doesn't turn her head away, small chomps of Purina kitten chow kibble and Bench & Field Holistic Natural food that she likes from Trader Joe's, and the occasional arugula piece (she LOVES arugula, and I was told that its okay in small doses for her), but we are extremely worried as she's definitely not eating enough. She's turned away from all types of wet food like Weruva, BFF brand (her usual fav), Rachel Ray, and that Hill AD high calorie stuff thats supposed to be pretty irresistible. We've even tried all sorts of lick-able treats, Chicken baby food, and bits of tuna, but she won't have it. She will sniff stuff, but then literally turn her head away or physically move away from it. I ordered Vetoquinol Nutri-Cal High Calorie Nutritional Oral Gel Supplement that I'm hoping maybe she will like, just to get some calories in her. Also going to try those Greenies Pill Pockets. Long story short, we are terrified and are desperately trying to get her eat/ feel better and would love any advice that anyone could give. Especially if anyone has any suggestions or advice on how to get her to eat and drink more? Like should we "force" feed her through a syringe with watered down wet food? Feel absolutely horrible doing that, but if its effective I'll give anything that won't hurt her a go. Other advice or tricks as to how we can administer her drugs better are greatly appreciated. Hoping and praying she makes it through – we love her so much and just like so many of these posts, its absolutely heartbreaking to see your pet go through this.

dog-name-icon

Beau

dog-breed-icon

Blue Russian

dog-age-icon

7 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

thumbs-up-icon

2 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Depression
Weight Loss
Jaundice
Lethargy
Not Eating
Inappetince
White Foam Throw Up

Similar to one of the posts below, "Rocky" our cat, Beau is a similar age (7) – she's a pretty small cat but lost quite a bit of weight for how small she is (about 2lbs), but was relatively acting normal just maybe a bit more lethargic looking back on it. We noticed she wasn't eating that much or anything at all and she had a similar greasy fur look to what Rocky's description had mentioned. We also noticed that she was throwing up what seemed to be like a white saliva foam of sorts. Two months prior she had her annual check up where everything was all good minus that her teeth were showing signs of severe dental disease and that she was 9lb's and shouldn't gain any more weight for her size. They quoted me that it was going to be upwards of $1,000 to get her teeth cleaned and any teeth removed since they put pets under anesthesia during the whole process. With this said, I was bummed and had quite the sticker shock, but started saving up and looking around at other good practices for lower quotes. We live in a city so the cost of living is pretty damn high and veterinarian's are generally costly as well. I was considering pet insurance and was actively looking into it for awhile, but didn't end up going forward with it because I've heard this, that, and the other thing that its a rip off. Whatever, I wish I did it though. So nonetheless, I was thinking that oh man I wonder if she's not eating because of her teeth? We got her into the vet and she diagnosed her with Jaundice – shes a grey cat so I didn't really notice the yellowing, but now I do. Her blood tests showed her bilirubin levels were super high and that something was up with her liver or one of her organs in that general area. She sent us immediately to the ER for ultrasounds and further testing to find out what was going on. Get this, her teeth are looking great??? But, good thing I saved up at least. We get to the ER and are told that she would get the ultrasound tomorrow morning since it was about 8pm at the time and the vet who does it had already left. They put her on an IV and catheter and monitor through the night until they did the ultrasound the next day. From it, they figured out her liver was swollen and yellowish, but could not distinguish the exact root of what was causing it. So they wanted to do a deeper look into her liver with microscopic evaluation (forgetting the actual term for it). The procedure would only be done if they could tell if she was clotting properly because like humans, when the liver is functioning properly there can be problems with clotting and they didn't want to run the risk of any internal bleeding. So, they run the first of coagulation tests after giving her K vitamins (which support coagulation) – comes back that she is still not clotting normally. She stays over at the hospital and they try again in the morning. Unfortunately, the same situation and they suggested we try giving her a Plasma-Blood Transfusion or they treat what they can treat, but we run the risk of not knowing what specifically is going on. The vet told us it could be anything from liver disease/ fatty liver disease, a liver infection, or liver cancer – which we were told is very fatal and even if she threw ever treatment, drug, everything she had it would be only a matter of months that she could live :(. The test was highly suggested so the doctor could help hone in as to what is actually causing this and how we go about treatment. Many $$$$$$ later, we went forth with the transfusion which in a series of unfortunate events we are told that it did not work and that she would require a new one. News to me in general that cats have a blood bank – makes total sense when you think of it, but it's also coming from other cats which means not a whole lot of blood. To make matters more scary, our cat has only had a small bit to eat for now almost 2 days which was mainly encouraged by an appetite stimulant, but then they needed her to have an empty stomach so they could do the procedure with anesthesia. Emotionally speaking, me and my partner are devastated, complete hot messes (especially me since I've had her since she was a kitten when I was in college) and have been through the whole duration so scared about losing her – she's truly the best and worth every penny if it means she can fight this. We were given the decision on whether we get her on antibiotics and treat the treatable (which could work if its not cancer) or try again the next day arrival they immediately. After consulting both the ER vet and her primary vet, we went ahead and got her started on the treatment in the hopes she would get better and we could test her blood potentially later on and get the procedure done. Long story short, Beau was dispatched after almost three days in the hospital with stable vital signs, with instructions to give her whatever food her heart desires to coax her to eat and a whole slewwww of meds etc. They go as follows: - Clavamox: antibiotic in case of infectious causes of liver disease - Marbofloxacin: antibiotic in case of infectious causes of liver disease - Vitakin K1: antibiotic for liver disease and to get her blood to clot - Denamarin: liver support drug - Maropitant (Cerenia): for anti-nausea, inappetence, or mild vomitting. - Mirataz: a transdermal appetite stimulant It's been about two and a half days since she's been home. We've never given her meds in the past so they suggested we get them compounded so that they taste like chicken and aren't so much liquid especially if she doesn't like the pills. Figured out very quickly that she just hyper salivates and drools the meds out so we got the pill versions to try out for a week to see if thats any better. It's been an interesting endeavor to say the least. We've watched multiple tutorials on how to do it properly and even have been using a pill popper to get them down. She hates it. Like, hates it. And we feel absolutely horrible because she's already under so much stress and it's a relative fight to get her to swallow both the liquid and the pills. To top it off, she has to take six meds a day and the Mirataz stuff on her ear. She's been pretty cuddly and will go on bouts of scratching stuff like her normal self which has been amazing, but she's still pretty lethargic and sleepy a lot of the time. We've put out I feel like everything under the sun when it comes to food. So far the only thing thing she will nibble on are a few Greenies treats on occasion when she doesn't turn her head away, small chomps of Purina kitten chow kibble and Bench & Field Holistic Natural food that she likes from Trader Joe's, and the occasional arugula piece (she LOVES arugula, and I was told that its okay in small doses for her), but we are extremely worried as she's definitely not eating enough. She's turned away from all types of wet food like Weruva, BFF brand (her usual fav), Rachel Ray, and that Hill AD high calorie stuff thats supposed to be pretty irresistible. We've even tried all sorts of lick-able treats, Chicken baby food, and bits of tuna, but she won't have it. She will sniff stuff, but then literally turn her head away or physically move away from it. I ordered Vetoquinol Nutri-Cal High Calorie Nutritional Oral Gel Supplement that I'm hoping maybe she will like, just to get some calories in her. Also going to try those Greenies Pill Pockets. Long story short, we are terrified and are desperately trying to get her eat/ feel better and would love any advice that anyone could give. Especially if anyone has any suggestions or advice on how to get her to eat and drink more? Like should we "force" feed her through a syringe with watered down wet food? Feel absolutely horrible doing that, but if its effective I'll give anything that won't hurt her a go. Other advice or tricks as to how we can administer her drugs better are greatly appreciated. Hoping and praying she makes it through – we love her so much and just like so many of these posts, its absolutely heartbreaking to see your pet go through this.

Acute Liver Failure Average Cost

From 339 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$1,000

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