Mammary Cancer Average Cost

From 228 quotes ranging from $3,000 - 8,000

Average Cost

$6,000

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What is Mammary Cancer?

Mammary gland cancers in cats are similar to breast cancer in humans. Mammary cancer is usually a malignant adenocarcinoma that appears in one or more of a cat’s breasts. Other forms of breast and mammary cancer in a cat include adenomas, duct papillomas, and sarcomas. Females, as well as males, can develop this form of cancer. When it appears in cats, it can be fatal, even if treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Adenocarcinomas are one of the most aggressive types of cancer, metastasizing or moving to the lymph nodes and other parts of the cat’s body. Siamese cats, cats between the ages of ten and fourteen years of age, and intact (not spayed) females are most likely to develop mammary and breast cancer.

Symptoms of Mammary Cancer in Cats

Cat owners and their vets will notice the following symptoms:

  • Swelling of the breasts or mammary glands
  • Infection in and around the glands and breasts
  • Skin ulceration surrounding the masses
  • Sores that don’t heal
  • Pain
  • Fever
  • Tumors appear as firm nodules firmly attached to the underlying muscle and skin
  • Clear, bloody, or milky discharge from the cat’s nipples
  • Dead (necrotic) tissue at the site of the tumor
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Unwillingness to eat
  • Weakness

Causes of Mammary Cancer in Cats

Several factors seem to influence why cats develop mammary or breast cancer:

  • Leaving cats intact (not spayed)
  • Allowing the cat to have several heat cycles or litters before spaying
  • Cat’s age (cancer usually begins when cats are between 10 and 14 years of age)
  • Hormones: if cats receive medications with estrogen, they are more likely to develop mammary or breast cancer
  • Siamese, Persian and other Oriental breeds, as well as domestic shorthaired cats are at higher risk of developing tumors of the breasts or mammary glands at younger ages

Diagnosis of Mammary Cancer in Cats

When a pet owner brings in a cat with mammary and breast tumors, the vet will conduct a full physical exam, focusing most on the mass or masses. They will palpate the masses and nearby lymph nodes, looking for a spread of the mass. 

Once this part of the exam is done, the vet orders X-rays, which enable them to determine how big the tumors and whether it has spread. In addition, the vet may order an abdominal ultrasound, looking for a spread of the tumor to other organs. They may also carry out a fine-needle biopsy, where they aspirate lymph nodes to check for the presence of cancer cells. They will order a complete blood count and a biochemical profile, which allows them to check on the cat’s overall health. Other diagnostic tests may include urinalysis and a clotting profile of the drawn blood sample. 

If surgery is decided upon, the surgeon may take a small sample of the tumor and send it to pathology for a biopsy, especially if they are sure the cat has mammary or breast cancer. This biopsy allows the pathologist to determine exactly what kind of cancer the cat has.

Treatment of Mammary Cancer in Cats

When a pet owner brings in a cat with mammary and breast tumors, the vet will conduct a full physical exam, focusing most on the mass or masses. They will palpate the masses and nearby lymph nodes, looking for a spread of the mass. 

Once this part of the exam is done, the vet orders X-rays, which enable them to determine how big the tumors and whether it has spread. In addition, the vet may order an abdominal ultrasound, looking for a spread of the tumor to other organs. They may also carry out a fine-needle biopsy, where they aspirate lymph nodes to check for the presence of cancer cells. They will order a complete blood count and a biochemical profile, which allows them to check on the cat’s overall health. Other diagnostic tests may include urinalysis and a clotting profile of the drawn blood sample. 

If surgery is decided upon, the surgeon may take a small sample of the tumor and send it to pathology for a biopsy, especially if they are sure the cat has mammary or breast cancer. This biopsy allows the pathologist to determine exactly what kind of cancer the cat has.

Recovery of Mammary Cancer in Cats

Generally, the prognosis for cats with breast or mammary cancer is guarded, with a few exceptions. If the cat’s tumor is smaller than 2cm, it may survive for up to three years. Cats with tumors between 2 and 3cm may survive fur up to two years and cats whose tumors are larger than 3cm may survive for up to six months. If the cat’s treatment for small tumors that were caught early is aggressive, the cat may live for between two and three years. Cats who underwent large resections (having one or both mammary chains removed) lived post-surgery for up to three years while those cats who had only the tumor removed lived for only one year after surgery.

It benefits the cat to be seen immediately by the vet when its owner detects a suspicious lump.

Over 60 percent of tumors that have been removed will redevelop within 12 months. Because cancerous mammary tumors are so aggressive in cats, their overall prognosis is guarded, especially since these tumors metastasize.

Mammary Cancer Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Salem
Black short hair
13 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lump in skin, not on his actual bod

Hello. My cat Salem who is 13 years old has a lump in his skin so it is not coming directly out of his body, it’s just a lump between the skin that hangs between his front of and stomach. He’s very energetic, he doesn’t look old. He throws up a lot of hairballs his entire life but other than that, he acts & looks like a young 5 year old cat. He’s very smart. But my mom noticed the lump yesterday and we are worried. It’s small & the size of the tip on a pinky. It’s a little squishy and like I said before, it hangs in his fur inside only by feeling it. He doesn’t have any symptoms. He’s just a little grumpy, a lap cat, throws up hair balls almost every day & is picky with his food.

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Fluffy
Persian
10 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None so far

Hello,
My cat is a 10 year old female Persian (She was spayed when she was 8). A few months ago I noticed she had a lump on her stomach. She had surgery to remove it and the dr discovered another one that he removed as well on the day of.
They were sent to a lab but the dr did not fully explain the report of the lab, so I was wondering if someone can explain it a bit more.

The masses were: 4*3*2 cm & 2.5*2*1.5 cm.
Diagnosis: mammary gland masses
intraductal carcinoma and infiltrating ductal carcinoma.
Sections from both masses reveral malignant spheroidal cells showing hyperchromatism, pleomorphism and enlarged nuclei. They are arranged in masses, islets and sheets. There are some ducts lined by malignant cells and forming cirpriform pattern. The tumor tissue is close to the lateral and deep surgical margins in both specimens.

She also had an xray before her surgery and her lungs were clear and her blood work was fine. She did not show any sign of illness just the lumps.

If a Dr. can explain this report I would be very grateful. And also from what is written in the report what steps would you hypothetically advise to take, and any idea about average life span would be appreciated. I know no confirmed prognosis can be given without examination, but any information and advice would be truly appreciated.
Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Your Veterinarian should have explained to you the histopathology report and advised you on any follow up care that may be needed: “intraductal carcinoma and infiltrating ductal carcinoma” is indicating the type of cancer and the location/origin (started growing in the milk duct and spread into the surrounding tissue); ”Sections from both masses reversal malignant spheroidal cells showing hyperchromatism, pleomorphism and enlarged nuclei. They are arranged in masses, islets and sheets. There are some ducts lined by malignant cells and forming cribriform pattern” indicates the morphology of the cells in the sample which the Pathologist observed in order to make the diagnosis; “The tumor tissue is close to the lateral and deep surgical margins in both specimens” indicates that the surgical margins were narrow and some tumour cells were found near the margin of the ‘healthy’ tissue when excised. From the report I cannot give any indication of prognosis and would recommend consulting your Veterinarian regarding follow up care since Fluffy is under their duty of care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you Dr. Callum for your response, much appreciated.

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TRENDAR R U MY SUNSHINE
Bengal
7 Months
Fair condition
-1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Acting normal

my breeding Bengal has been 3 strong heats. she is not yet 8 months old.
She has been beside but I am certain not with a male.
After 4 days strong calling, I used the q tip method to take her out of heat.
since then she has had small lumpy circular firmness around her teats.
I have massaged it and pinched it,This is not tender.
Do you think she may be having a hormone thing, making some milk or is it something worse?
should I havve a hormone level test done? can any vet do this?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
It does sound like your cat is having a heat cycle, and mammary development can occur with those hormone changes. If the behaviors and mammary development continue, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian to determine whether she is having a problem or is having a normal heat cycle. They'll be able to assess her and recommend any necessary testing that she may need.

My 10 year old neutered cat was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer in October 2016. She had a full mastectomy incl removal of the lymph nodes. Sadly we noticed in early February little pea sized hard modules including under her throat area. Two of the 5 lumps (so far), have grown extremely fast and are about 3 to 4 times larger. Cat went back to Vet for checkup and biopsies last Monday. The result came back and she not only lost 800 g of her weight despite great appetite, but all modules are secondary tumours. Nothing can be done anymore as it has gone into the lymph system bar giving her lots of TLC. Vet subscribed Metacam to treat any pain. We wonder what her lifespan under this is going to be - truly devastated

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Lexi
Domestic shorthair
9 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Mammary Gland Enlargement

I have a spayed 9 year old cat. She was a stray and she brought her kittens to us in 2010. We had her and the kittens spayed and neutered. In December of 2016, I noticed a lump and took her to the vet. We had a cat with mammary cancer before, so I suspected that was the issue. It was and she had aggressive surgery. The vet removed as much surrounding tissue as possible. About 5 months later, I felt another lump and took her back to the vet. The cancer had come back. We opted not to have additional surgeries. The lumps have continued to grow and one is about the size of a golf ball located in her armpit area. My question is, can the vet aspirate the mass to make it smaller and to make my cat more comfortable? I called them, but they said just bring her in. Well, she hates going to the vet and I don't want to make any part of her remaining time scary or painful if it's not necessary.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Aspiration of a mass is only effective if the mass is liquid inside (cyst, abscess, mucocele etc…), for solid tumours it isn’t an option. You should visit your Veterinarian regardless to see if you need to start thinking about palliative care or other arrangements if the mass gets larger. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Whiskey
Domestic longhair
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

back leg weakness

8 year old kitty. Fixed at age 5. Had mammary lumps about a year and a half ago, benign. New lumps formed about a year later. They grew very quickly and very large. One is 10c, one is 2c. Xray shows 2 possible masses in lungs and her back legs have become extremely weak in a week's time frame. She seems happy, eats/drinks aaaaaand is alert. Vet recommend quality of life. Is it worth getting a blood test or having the lumps removed? She also lost a few lbs in 2 months.

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Kusia
Maine Coon
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My cat is turning 13 years old this summer, and I recently noticed a few small lumps around her mammary glands. At first, they were extremely small. I took my cat to the vet and she told me that a biopsy is usually inconclusive but, if they're cancerous lumps, surgery may not be recommended at her age because the cancer could spread regardless. I was told to keep an eye out for changes in lump size and changes in behavior. The lumps have grown. And there MAY be nipple discharge. But so far no noticeable changes in behavior. What would you advise I do? Would a biopsy be a good idea after all? Would it tell me anything other than whether or not it's cancerous? And would surgery to have the lumps removed be a good idea if it is? I'm not sure how long her life expectancy is and if surgery would do enough to keep her healthy.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Some mammary cancers are benign, and only cause problems because they grow. If you are able to have the masses removed and sent away for pathology, that would give you the most information, and give Kusia the best chance at not having the lumps continue to grow. It is much easier to remove those masses when they are small. If your veterinarian does not want to remove them, it may be worth seeking a second opinion to see if another veterinarian thinks it might be a good idea, since I cannot examine her.

My mom's cat just passed away last weekend. We found a lump in her breast in October 17. The biopsy came back cancer. So my mom said no agressive treatment, it isnt going to do anything anyway. She never had another tumor, I think the cancer spread inside of her. She just stopped eating, and became really skinny and passed away.

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Squee
Maine Coon
8 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lump
fluid expressed

My cat starting exhibiting symptoms in June. Intially, I felt a lump on her mammary, and made an appointment for the following week. I've predominately had male cats in the past, so it never occured to me that my cat, my sweet Squee, could get mammary cancer. I felt so guilty, like I had been neglecting her. The mass was about the size of a pinky finger tip, tubular in nature. The vet examined her, and was able to completely express the mass down, I was relieved. All her lab work came back great as well. A month later, the mass returned, hardened this time. I took her back, the vet advised surgery. I took about 6 weeks to decide. Her appetite never lacked nor her energy leading up to the surgery, thus I waited. I was hoping it was just scar tissue. It didn't seem to be growing, but I went ahead and scheduled the surgery for last week. It was a grade 1 mammary adenocarcinoma on her left upper mammary. Squee is doing well since the surgery. She also has a heart murmur, making the surgery more dangerous. They only removed the mammary and tumor, and I'm concerned that we should be more aggressive, and continue with the rest of the chain, but the longer the surgery, the more taxing on her little heart. The next step for me is going to be having her x-rayed to ensure the tumor was isolated. I hate this. I just want my sweet, little companion to be okay.

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Zuzu
birmane
1 Month
Fair condition
-1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Skin Lump

I have a 12 year birmanese cat who was operated 3 months ago for mammary tumor. was sterilized at 10 after complications.Everything went well and the recovery was pretty fast. Also the pre operatory blood tests were all good to the doctors amazement. they asked if i want biopsy but didn't necessary advise to because they said that will only tell you if is malignant or not, but will not change the long term treatment as they consider getting her under chimio would mean unnecessary pain and stress for her and i dont want to put her through that. they gave me some oncologic natural pills, but she refuses them to take no matter how: swallow as it is, powder in the food, diluted with water (i got really scared when i tried that because she started puking and making bubbles at her mouth). now i notice 4 bumps on her body in different places that are growing. 3 are in the skin, not attached to the body. 1 is on her forehead and it attached to her skull. like she just bumped into something and is swollen. she has not lost her appetite and no change in her behavior and i will be visiting the doctor this weekend for consult. but i want your opinion on what should be done next. personally i think some cells migrated and now are growing. what would be the best approach to that?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
It is very unlikely that the lumps that you are describing are related to her mammary cancer, as that type of cancer only grows in mammary tissue. It would be best to have her seen, I agree, and have those lumps evaluated to see what they might be and what is going on with her so that a plan can be started for her.

My lovely Zuzu died at 5:47 am this morning, next to me. The lumps were swollen lymphatic nodes affected by cancer.I cannot verbally describe the pain of the experience of her passing away, the sound of her crying in her final moments and the twitches of her body trying to breath after her lungs have collapsed. Tonight my sweet Zuzu will sleep alone in the dark. There is no God in dying. No mercy and no after plan.

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Isha
tabby shorthair
9 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Cancerous cells in left lymph nodes

Hi I would love a second opinion for my cat, Isha. About 2 months ago I noticed a lump under one of her left nipples. I took her to the vet who advised a lumpectomy and analysis of the lump. It came back as mammary carcinoma.

The good news was they felt they got all of the tumor as the surrounding cells were normal. I was then advised to opt for a left sided masectomy to prevent the change of spread as breast cancer is so aggressive in cats. However, I did not like the idea of doing preventative surgery when I wasn't 100% sure Isha was cured of cancer.

My vet advised a CT scan, which came back with 2 areas of slight concern (some cells in the spleen and some in the lungs) but the general deduction was that these were not metastasized tumors, but likely to be age related scar tissue (they did state that even the best CT scans cannot state 100% free of cancer, but it was likely that these 2 areas were not cancerous).

On this result, I went ahead with a left sided masectomy. Isha recovered extremely well after surgery, and the removed strip and lymph nodes were sent to histopathology.

I've just had the results back from the lab, and I'm devastated to find the removed lymph nodes have signs of cancer. Therefore she likely has cancerous cells in her right now. Because of this result, my vet has advised me to cancel plans to do a preventative right sided masectomy, and instead decide whether I opt for chemotherapy or not.

My main worry is that my vet is being very vague with me on what we could do in Isha's best interests. I was told by them the CT scan came back clear apart from 2 slightly suspect areas, as explained above. Not once was there any suspicion of any issues on the left breast tract. And yet now I find Isha has cancerous cells in the very area where she had the tumor. Isn't the point of a CT scan to see if the cancer has spread before doing any preventative surgery? It would make sense if it came back that one of the 2 suspect areas (lungs or spleen) was the culprit, but it wasn't! I almost feel the CT scan was practically useless.

The second issue is whether I should opt for chemotherapy. My vet tells me that there isn't enough studies to show that chemotherapy even helps extend life in cats, but at the same time, it is 'recommended.' Again this doesn't make sense. I know the decision is mine to make, but when I'm given only one option for treatment, and then told that there's no previous data to say it actually is of any benefit, it does not seem like much of a choice!

Money isn't an issue here, I'll happily pay for ongoing chemo, but of course I don't want to put Isha through the rigors of monthly chemo for no reason.

I know that no vet, no matter how eminent, can give a 100% 'correct' treatment plan, and there's a lot of grey area here. But my vet is really not instilling much confidence in me (perhaps they are worried about the current 'sue everyone at the drop of a hat' culture we're in, and are staying as vague as possible to ensure there are no litigation issues in the future - I'd never sue a vet, by the way.....you guys do an amazing job and you're allowed to get things wrong sometimes, you're only human)

So sorry for such a lengthy post, but I'm now starting to have sleepless nights worrying abut whether I'm doing the best by Isha. It's not so much her possible death that hurts me, we all die.... it's the not knowing what course of action to take that's in her best interests which is really making me anxious. I hope you will be able to give me a much needed second opinion.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
I understand your concerns and whilst I cannot offer a second opinion as I haven’t examined Isha, I can at least answer some questions so you better understand the situation to make an informed decision. Your main concern is about the CT scan being clear and the histopathology of the lymph nodes showing cancerous cells; the thing is that there is a certain level of resolution a CT scanner has and microscopic clusters of cancerous cells are not going to show up until they are much larger in size which is why we use histopathology to examine lymph nodes as they act as a filter and can tell us a lot, the CT scan wasn’t useless as it would have shown if there were larger or multiple nodules which would have changed the direction of treatment. As for chemotherapy, this is a difficult one to call with various studies giving different information; most information is available for dogs (use of piroxicam) but not much with cats. If you are looking for a thorough second opinion, I would recommend consulting a telemedicine provider like PetRays for a second opinion by a board certified Veterinarian Oncologist who would be more up to date on this area than myself. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://petrays.com/specialists/oncology/

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Kenya
tabby
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lumps

My female cat is 11 yrs old. She had 2 lumps removed from her abdominal area several days ago. She didn’t show any of the signs of being ill other than the 2 lumps I found around her abdominal area. She was very active as usual and her appetite was hearty. After the surgery, she is just laying and occasionally walks around with me. I figure she is still recovering from the surgery and is quite sore. She still has 2 days left if her pain meds for swelling and about 5-7 days for her nerve pain. My vet just called me this morning after receiving the report on her testing of the masses removed. She has mammary cancer. Im planning on getting her treatment and will consult a specialist that treats cancers such as this. I broke down upon hearing the news. I have 2 cats, both sisters. They are a joy and life in the House. Well, my question(s) is/are: since I’ve had the 2 masses removed, what are her chances of not having any more cancerous masses growing? Also, will treatment still be needed even if no cancerous cells develop? If they are dormant, will chemo/and or another form of treatment eliminate the cancerous growths whether they are active or dormant?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Mammary cancer is an umbrella term for different types of cancer both benign and malignant, however the majority of mammary tumours in cats are malignant (around 80%); without knowing the specific type of cancer found it is difficult to give advice, however the Oncologist will be able to tell you more after examining her and reviewing the histopathology report. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/our-services/oncology-and-hematology/common-tumor-types/feline-mammary-tumors www2.vet.cornell.edu/departments-centers-and-institutes/cornell-feline-health-center/health-information/feline-health-topics/mammary-tumors

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Spool
Persian
9 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My cat had a tumor, we got it all out (cleared with biopsy)
Now only 3 monthes after she seems to have another tumor (not where the previous one was) but it's where she had stitches, not sure if it was there before- could it be scarring?
Should I put my cat through another operation? Is it wise to remove the whole chain? What are the odds for survival? I don't know how old she is but we're assuming around 9-10
She does not seem to be in pain, has great appetite and acts the same.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
If the swelling is at the incision site, it may be a seroma which is a fluid filled pocket which occurs after surgery in some cases; without examining Spool I cannot say for sure but is it a possibility. I would have your Veterinarian check it out to see what's happening and to ease your concerns; your other questions would vary widely so an answer wouldn’t give any precise information. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sophie
no breed
11 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

As above

My cat died on Tuesday3rd April after Easter, she was full of life & eating well late last year 2017 I found a swelling on her lower abdominal I thought it was fat even though she is not a big cat, I noticed that she was licking it very tenderly & was going to take her to the Vets after Easter but she became very lethargic on Easter Sunday & didn't want to go out side as she usually did, she loves to go out side, I new some thing was wrong & had to wait till Tuesday THE 3rd April, the Vet took blood & I waited till I got the results & it was not her Kidneys or Thyroid, the Vet thought it was an infection & gave her an Antibiotic injection & at 12.10 that night she had a seizure she made a loud groaning nois & shook all over, I don't think she was aware that I was there, she died about 1am I now think it was breast Cancer & I am wondering if the Antibiotic Injection caused her to have the seizure, I should have taken her to the vet last year when I saw the swelling, she lost a lot of weight & fur, she was a long haired cat & her fur got so short, she had an amazing thick tail but there was hardly no fur on it at the end but she never lost her joy for life until the last few days, she had the most amazing personality & I feel I let her down by not taking her to the vet earlier, I cant stop crying I miss her so much, she was grey & white & very beautiful.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It is normal to have these feelings under these circumstances, it would have been best to visit your Veterinarian immediately when noticing the presence of the lump; I cannot say whether the lump was cancer, an inguinal hernia or something else however the loss of weight and body condition would be consistent with cancer. If you are looking to definite answers, I would recommend you have your Veterinarian perform a necropsy to determine the cause of death. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sushi
Siamese
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

nipple swelling, clear discharge

Medication Used

none

I have an 11 year old beautiful Siamese/domestic mix cat. she has been dealing with some ankylosing spondylitis for the last three years and we have been giving her steroid shots for the last year every 3-4 months. They tend to perk her up and give her strength. The last two haven't done much justice. She got her last injection of steroids on Monday of this week. She had been more lethargic, sleepy and laying around a lot more. NOt really wanting to be around people that much. Tonight I came home from work and was rubbing her belly and found a irregular cystic lump around one of her nipples. I showed my husband and he squeezed it a bit and we noticed clear fluid coming out of the nipple. no erythema or warmth noted around said nipple, just discharge. it has been expressed and size has been decreasing since expression. Do I need to worry this is mammary cancer? Ductal papilloma? Thanks for your help!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Without examining it and possible sending a sample off for histopathology I cannot say for certain what it is; if there was some discharge from the nipple I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side as I cannot give you any assurances without an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Akira
european
6 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

no symptoms

Hello,
I need your opinion for my cat, a wonderful 6 year old tortoise shell.
I took her to the vet immediately after feeling little nodules on her belly.
She had surgery a month ago and her mammary chain has been removed. She had several little nodules, superficials. The biopsy revealed that this was an adenocarcinoma, with moderate mitotic activity, and that the lymphatical node is healthy. The x-rays didn't reveal any metastasis.
My vet advised me to remove the other mammary chain, but didn't talk about chemotherapy.
Unfortunately I noticed today that she has a new nodule, very little (2mm) on the other mammary chain. I hope there is still time to save her...
Do you think that the fact that the cancer restarts at the other side is a sign of aggresivity? Or maybe juste because both mammary chains received the same hormonal impregnation?
Her surgery is programmed on the 19th of July.
I don't want to give her another surgery, if the chances to cure this cancer are weak...
Thanks for your help...

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It would be good to have the other mammary chain removed regardless, I know this is a stressful time for you but I cannot give you any assurances that there hasn’t been any further spread of the cancer without further histopathology and x-rays to check again for any secondary tumours. The use of chemotherapy in cases of mammary adenocarcinoma is generally unrewarding and radical mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?meta=&pId=11147&id=3846248

Thank you. She will have her surgery very soon. It's dificult to be optimistic, i only read bad experiences, this is a terible cancer.
Do you think that it's posible to cure this cancer if treated very quickly ? My vet sayed it's posible. I will try everything to save her, she could live many years more...

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Kitty
DOMESTIC
14 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lumps

We have a 14 year old spayed female short hair cat. She has some fleshy lumps in several of her mammory glands. My daughter says there was fluid coming from it.

She is overall healthy, shiny coat, good appetite and no infections or ulcerations around the site. She's had these lumps for quite some time and I don't believe they have rapidly increased in size.

My daughter is of the belief that her cat is dying.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Any masses on the mammary glands should be taken seriously and at a minimum should be examined by your Veterinarian to be on the safe side; a fine needle aspirate may be useful to determine the types of cells present within the mass. Once the masses have been checked by your Veterinarian you will be able to either put your daughter’s mind at rest or to have them removed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Peanut
DOMESTIC
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

tumor

My cat was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. She had a knot on her belly about the size of a golf ball. When we were on vacation it busted. We are now being told she should have an x ray to see if it spread. Should we go forward with an x ray or should we have her put down? Having the tumor removed will cost 1500.00. On top of the 250.00 for x rays

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It is quite possible that removal of the tumor may be curative for Peanut. Whether you decide to have x-rays, or the surgery, is a personal decision. You can discuss risks, benefits, and options with your veteirnarian.

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Jazzy
dsh
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Skin Inflamation
Not Social
Poor Appetite
Weight Loss
Skin Crust

My cat was seen - had bad infection. However vet noticed lump on mammary gland and more than likely was mammary cancer. I didn't do further testing due to costs. My cat now has scaps and hot spots is that due to the supposed mammary cancer? If the lump is about 2in how long would you predict her survival?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. WIthout seeing Jazzy, I'm not sure whether the scabs are due to the mammary lump, but those aren't commonly related. She may have an unrelated skin condition that needs to be treated. It would be a good idea to have her rechecked to have her skin evaluated and have any treatments given that she may need. As far as her prognosis, without knowing more about her, I can't predict that - mammary tumors all behave differently, and it will depend on how quickly it progresses. I hope that she does well.

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Cleo
Maincoon Himilayan
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lumps

I have a 9 month old unfixed kitten. She went into her first heat Dec 16. On the 26th I found 2 lumps on her chest near her armpit. They were about the size of a chick pea. A week later they were the size of a large grape and there were about 10 chick pea sized ones down her stomach. I took her to the vet and they said they have never seen anything like it. They think it is cancer but say she is too young. I didnt have the $500 for all the testing so they gave her a needle in the back of her neck with antibiotics. I took her home and within a week the smaller lumps on her belly were gone but the two bigger ones near her armpit had doubled in size. I wasn't going to do much thinking it was cancer but now I'm wondering. If it was cancer, the lumps would not have disappeared?? The two by her armpit at this point are huge! Probably 4 inches wide and stick out about 2 1/2 inches. The two she has left on her lower belly are now the size of a grape. Any idea what could be causing this? We have her sister and an orange tabby I got when he was just 3 days old (he's 2 weeks younger then them and was neutered at 3 months) My husband believes she will have a short life because of how fast the lumps are growing so he doesn't want to put a bunch of money into her. I on the other hand love her to pieces and don't want to loose her. I don't work so he has the final say when it comes to the vet fees. Can u suggest the cheapest way of figuring out what this is? The only change I have noticed with her is that she really really wants vegetables. I was cleaning out the fridge and the was a rotten container of spinach. She went crazy trying to get it. Bit my hand when I tried to take it away. Not like her at all. A couple days later she found about a 2 inch piece of lettuce on the floor and ate it up before I could get to her. I've never seen this before. She is an indoor cat. Unvaxinated.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
The best course of action at this time would be to try and find a charity clinic which would see Cleo in return for a donation or similar, you would need to do a Google search and you may need to travel a distance but it would be worth it; at this stage (since I cannot examine Cleo) it would be best to have a fine needle aspirate done of one of the masses to determine the contents and to examine the cells present in the aspirate. Also check out the links below to find organisations which may be able to help with the cost of veterinary care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.felineoutreach.org/organizations.html www.dogingtonpost.com/need-help-with-vet-bills-or-pet-food-there-are-resources-available/

My 10 year old neutered cat was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer in October 2016. She had a full mastectomy incl removal of the lymph nodes. Sadly we noticed in early February little pea sized hard modules including under her throat area. Two of the 5 lumps (so far), have grown extremely fast and are about 3 to 4 times larger. Cat went back to Vet for checkup and biopsies last Monday. The result came back and she not only lost 800 g of her weight despite great appetite, but all modules are secondary tumours. Nothing can be done anymore as it has gone into the lymph system bar giving her lots of TLC. Vet subscribed Metacam to treat any pain. We wonder what her lifespan under this is going to be - truly devastated

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Meow Meow
Manx
16 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

breast cancer

My cat has been living with breast cancer for a year now, we recently took her in for her yearly exam and the vet said it has spread and she might not have much longer. He prescribed pregnisone for the inflamation and to keep her comfortable. I guess my question is, what should I expect in the coming days? She still eats well, poops good, she walks around the yard and the house, if she didn’t have those giant hard bumps on her tummy
I wouldn’t think she was sick at all ya know? Is there anything I should keep an eye out for? Any advice or information would be amazing

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Mammary cancer can cause MeowMeow to become ill where she doesn't want to eat or drink and feels terrible. It can also affect her so that she just isn't comfortable because the masses are large, or start to bleed and become necrotic. Either of those situations would let you know that her life is not enjoyable anymore. Your veterinarian can help guide you as to when she may be suffering, so that you don't let that happen. I'm sorry that this is happening to her.

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Nickey
Short hair domestic
14 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Appetite laggy pancreatic enzymes ^

Mycat's mammary gland wase about a centimetre in length s n blackish grey colour and about half of it is thiscolour now.It appears kind ofvattached to the white sectionnow.Ds thissound like mammary cancer?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Without examining Nickey I cannot (legally) say for certain but any enlargement, change in colour, change of shape of lesions among other signs may be an indicator for mammary cancer; you should get Nickey checked by your Veterinarian to be on the safe side and to get a diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Abbey
Black
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Hi my cat has breast cancer and has a horrible smell and oozing from the infected area. Is that harmful to humans? When she was diagnosed with this we looked into information regarding this type of cancer and opted not to put her through any surgery being she was older in age. November will be a year since diagnosis.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Whilst it isn’t directly harmful to humans, it is not pleasant and may drip infected material around your home which isn’t good; especially if you have young children. You should visit your Veterinarian for a course of antibiotics and to get it drained and cleaned up. Whilst you may not want the surgical route, it may be required if the infection is severe but this would need to be discussed with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Preshes
Tuxedo
9 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Agg
Lazy
Loss of Appetite
Sleepy

How long will it take for the cancer to fully take over and slowly kill my cat? What’s the best way to treat this ? She’s my little girl and I can’t lose her. I’ve had her half my life and I can’t lose her; so how long ? I need to know. I can not wait any longer.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
The problem is that it depends on the type of cancer (around 85% of feline mammary tumours are malignant) and whether or not there is lymph node involvement; if caught early radical mastectomy may be performed along with the removal of regional lymph nodes, surgery when combined with chemotherapy is considered the treatment of choice. Without examining Preshes and taking a fine needle aspirate of a lymph node I cannot start to give an indication of life expectancy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/our-services/oncology-and-hematology/common-tumor-types/feline-mammary-tumors www2.vet.cornell.edu/departments-centers-and-institutes/cornell-feline-health-center/health-information/feline-health-topics/mammary-tumors

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Snickers
DOMESTIC
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Normal behavior, lumps along mammay

My cat Snickers had a cancerous tumor removed from her mammary chain about a year ago. The lump was removed and there were no cancer cells present after the surgery. A few months ago, I noticed to additional lumps along the same mammary chain. I now plan on having both of her mammary chains removed by surgery and going from there.

We are going to the vet next week but I'm very nervous that the cancer has already spread to her lymph nodes or lungs. How likely is it for the cancer to spread to her lymph nodes or lungs after a year (when the post surgery test showed nothing)?How quickly can that happen?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
It really depends on the type of mammary tumour among many other factors; there is a risk that there is spread to regional lymph nodes or other organs but it is difficult to stay statistically as there are many variables. Your Veterinarian will be able to tell you more based on their findings. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Porsha
tabby
13 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

My cat is 13 years old female sterilized and found a lump on breast in November/December 2017, the vet I saw then said it's not hurting her and if she's eating fine then just to keep an eye on it and nothing about spread or an x-ray.

Fast forward towards end May, I wanted to have her lumps removed at another vet clinic and they said it has already spread to the lungs and about a 1cm spread and just to be sure it's not an inflammed lymph node.

The report came back that it's a heterogeneous 2.65mm x 2.55mm so I was already prepared and was told she's got 3-6 months left since it's already spread. S

Thinking and focusing on alternative methods, I decided to consult with a close to holistic vet and she couldn't get any documents and upon checking my cat's lung and stuff, decided she wanted to do her own x-ray and then consulted with told me she asked 3 of her colleagues opinion and they all agree there is no spread and she's not as sick and able to do surgery.

Previously, her surgery was cancelled since it spread to her lungs and she wouldn't do well under anaesthesia and if she does, she might be really sick or worse after.

My question is, which is right? What is going on? One doctor saw it on x-ray and another says it's not there and even though she read the chest ultrasound, she said it's not accurate and inconclusive. Holistic vet also said, can't give her a 3mths-6mths to life since she is not seeing what they did.

Furthermore, the vet who first did the x-ray and canceled the surgery, said that lung symptoms don't show till the lung is 50% compromised and while the holistic vet said she heard no wheezing and shows no signs of lung symptoms nor do her xray show a cloudy parts which is what is normally seen in a spread to the lungs from the breast. A metastasis. Then what was the ultrasound showing at 2cm ++ x 2cm ++...

Very confused

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Without seeing her test results, I'm unfortunately not able to shed much light on what might be going on with Porsha, unfortunately. I think that you need to decide which of the veterinarians that you have seen you trust more, and ask for more information. There are board certified specialists that can look at x-rays and ultrasound results and give a second opinion, and it might be a good idea to start there, to sort of get an unbiased opinion on the x-rays and ultrasound results, as that seems quite pivotal in all of this. I hope that she is okay.

I should have added that I'm not in US or Canada so I'm not familiar of board certified specialist with unbiased opinions.

The question is, is there something else that could be showing up in the ultrasound?

My vet sees the other clinic's xray and says, she still sees it on their xray.

The holistic vet is new and I have not consulted with her before so I have not developed trust with her at this moment. She seems more interested in getting a CT scan going ahead with the surgery that its not a big operation and making it seem like a light situation but my regular vet says that the stress to the lungs due to the anaesthesia,she might not wake and if she does, not do so well.

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chelsea
American Shorthair
14 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

what should I feed my cat who is 14 and has mammary gland cancer? she is not eating very much and I want to make sure that what she does eat is healthy for her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
There are a lot of people online recommending numerous different diets for cancer in cats, however Tuft’s university checked 27 online diets and found that they didn’t meet the basic nutritional requirements for their intended species; it is important to find a balanced diet suitable for Chelsea which she will accept as there is no specific ideal diet just one that she will eat. If she isn’t eating you may want to encourage appetite by mixing some smooth wet food with a little water and syringing it into her mouth; alternatively some wet foods if heated slightly are more appetising due to an increased smell. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2017/08/cancer_diet/

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Meowmix
short hair
9 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My cat has stage 1, maybe stage 2 breast cancer. Both Mammary chains were removed along with a swollen lymph node where the growth was. We are debating whether chemo is the next best option for her. Cost is not a factor. We are more concerned with her quality of life and longevity.

I have also read that Chemo in cats may not be effective and have not been well tested. With this limited information, what does her prognosis look like and what would you suggest as a treatment plan.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining Meow Mix, and based on limited information, I do find it difficult to give you an idea of prognosis or a proposed treatment plan. If the tumor exhibited HER2 expression, the prognosis is more guarded, but there are a number of other factors. Surgery is often curative with mammary cancer, but the results of several studies suggest that systemic adjuvant chemotherapy may be useful for treating mammary carcinoma after surgical excision. If you have the means to do so, and you have a veterinary oncologist or confident primary veterinarian, it may benefit her to have the chemotherapy. Cats typically tolerate chemotherapy much better than people. It would be best to have this conversation with your veterinarian, as they know her entire situation. I hope that she recovers completely.

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Nala
Domestic shorthair
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Open cancerous ulcers on mammaries

Medication Used

none

Hello,
My domestic shorthaired cat was diagnosed with mammary cancer a year ago. They told us she would probably only live another year unless we got the entire mammectomy done, but my father refused to pay the amount toward the surgery.
She now has open sores on her abdominals, which are oozing. And I want to keep them clean and wrap her up but I’m not sure how. She is full of life, walks around just fine, eats and drinks like normal. My sister thinks we should put her down but I can’t seem to decide which is the better decision considering she acts like a happy, normal cat. I’m sure she’s in some pain from the cancer and sores, but It’s such a tough decision.
Do you think we should keep the area clean for now and wait until she gets worse, or would it be best/more moral to put her down considering the circumstances?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Once mammary tumours start ulcerating, there is little else to do apart from surgery (which it appears is not an option); bathing the ulcers with a dilute antiseptic and removing any discharge is not a long term solution. However, you need to decide whether you should continue to bathe the ulcers/sores or if you will decide if it is time for euthanasia. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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