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What is Bleeding From the Nose?

Cats can develop bleeding noses due to a number of circumstances. Circumstances for a bloody nose may be as simple as running into a wall, or it may be due to bacterial or viral infections or parasitic infestation. Even foreign bodies in the nasal passages may be to blame. Serious nosebleeds may cause additional symptoms such as black, tarry stools and dark vomit that appears to have coffee grounds in it. These additional symptoms are a result of ingesting blood due to the bleeding nose. 

  • Blood disorders
  • Foreign object
  • Infections
  • Injury
  • Nasal tumor
  • Parasitic infestation
  • Poison

Why Bleeding From the Nose Occurs in Cats

Blood Disorders

Some disorders of the blood may cause an overall increase in bleeding incidents. The most common blood disorders that are known to cause problems in felines include feline leukemia and feline infectious anemia, both of which result in anemia, which can induce nosebleeds. 

Foreign Object

Cats may develop a nosebleed due to a foreign object getting caught in their nose, such as a grass seed. A cat with a foreign object in their nose is also likely to be sneezing frequently, and repeated sneezing can prevent the blood in the nasal passages from clotting. 

Infections

Several viral and bacterial illnesses are known to cause bleeding, including bleeding from the nose. Nosebleeds are a symptom of diseases instigated by the bacteria that cause Ehrlichiosis and Rocky Mountain Spotted fever, and many upper respiratory viruses also cause bleeding from the nose.

Injury

Nosebleeds can be caused by something as simple as running into something nose first or due to trauma from a cat fight or accident as the nasal passages in felines are very sensitive and tend to bleed easily due to trauma. In many cases, cats that have sustained an injury to the nose have also received injuries that affect the mouth. 

Nasal Tumor

Tumors in the nasal passages can trigger nasal bleeding in more than one way. The tumor may cause bleeding by pressing on the sides of the nasal passages, or it may cause itching and irritation which may cause the cat to scratch its own nose, causing it to bleed. 

Parasitic Infestation

Fleas and ticks are also capable of causing an increase in bleeding by altering the platelet count and reducing the ability of the blood to clot. If the blood has been depleted enough by the parasites, regular nosebleeds may occur. On rare occasions, this kind of bleeding may lead to coma and death if not addressed. 

Poison

Certain types of poison can increase the likelihood of bleeding. One of the more notable poisons to be characterized by this symptom is rat poison.

What to do if your Cat is Bleeding From the Nose

If your cat develops a nosebleed, the first course of action will be to stop the bleeding. This is usually accomplished by a few simple steps. It is imperative to remain calm during the treatment process as causing additional stress for the animal may also increase their blood pressure. Clean off as much blood as you can and try and ensure that the nasal passages are not blocked, then apply either direct pressure or a cold compress on the top of the muzzle, being careful not to block the nose when doing so. This is of particular concern for brachycephalic felines such as the Persian or Scottish Fold breeds. If the bleeding doesn’t stop, if it occurs repeatedly, or if you have no clear indication of why it is happening you should contact your veterinarian or just bring the cat in. 

The visit will generally start with a full physical where the examining vet will assess the animal for any physical wounds or pain that may indicate that physical trauma has occurred, as well as checking for any foreign bodies or tumors that are visible in the nasal passages. The mouth area will also be examined to check for damage or signs of bacterial or viral infections, particularly around the teeth and gums. Along with the standard diagnostic tests of urinalysis, complete blood count and a biochemical profile, there are several other tests that may need to be employed in order to determine the underlying cause of the bloody nose, including imaging of the nasal area using CT scans, MRIs, and x-rays, rhinoscopy evaluations, clotting tests, and serologic tests to check for certain infectious diseases. Based on these tests, you and your veterinarian will determine a treatment plan, which could include the administration of epinephrine to constrict the blood vessels, antibiotic or antifungal medications, and flea and tick treatments. Surgical methods may even be used to remove deeply embedded foreign objects and growths or to repair damage in the nose or mouth.

Prevention of Bleeding From the Nose

There are several ways to reduce the chances of a nosebleed occurring by lowering the chances of the underlying conditions that can trigger the bleeding. Outdoor cats are more likely than indoor cats to get foreign objects like grass seeds in their noses and may have an increased chance of catching bacterial or viral infections or incurring injury.

Toxins and medications should be stored in cat proof canisters or in cabinets with childproof latches to protect cats that are indoors and if you have a kitten or active cat, steps to kitten-proof the house, such as removing unstable climbing temptations like tablecloths, keeping breakables out of reach, and tying any drapery cords out of reach or cut the loops and plastic ends off altogether, may help to prevent traumatic injuries in the house that might result in a nosebleed. Regular veterinary visits, including dental visits, may also catch nosebleed-inducing illnesses and conditions before any bleeding starts.

Cost of Bleeding From the Nose

Although the national cost on average for treating nosebleeds in cats is around $800, the cost of treating some of the conditions that cause nosebleeds can run a bit higher. Ehrlichiosis, for instance, can run around $1000, and poisonings average around $2500 to treat successfully.

Bleeding From the Nose Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Bridgett
Maine Coon
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Congestion, Epistaxis, Anorexia

Medication Used

Convenia, Steroid, Itrafungol

I have a 7 year old always indoor female feral kittle, Bridget (aka Ms. Fluffy Britches) that has been suffering from nasal congestion, sneezing, for 6 days, and a bleeding nose for the last 4 days. Bridget had obvious nasal congestion (snoring type sounds when breathing) for about 3 days prior to the beginning of the epistaxis. I took Bridget to our local vet four days ago, and she received a long-acting antibiotic injection and a steroid injection. She was also given 2000ml of Ringers Lactate sub-q fluid for mild dehydration: extra fluid was given as a precaution. Bridget's breathing was slightly improved within a few hours of the sub-q fluid, but her nose continued to bleed slightly. Yesterday I gave Bridget a concoction of approximately 200mg N-Acetyl cysteine with a scant amount of vitamin C dissolved into an electrolyte solution, and within about 45 minutes, She started sneezing and expelled several large mucous laced blood clots. Her ability to breathe through her nose was improved after the sneezing episode. Bridget is still a very feral cat, so she only eats and typically only drinks water at night, and never when anyone is watching. I have not observed evidence of Bridget eating or drinking anything for the last three days, so I have been giving her a liquid high-calorie/high nutrition supplement. I took Bridget back to the vet yesterday where she received another 1000ml of sub-q fluid, and I brought the bag home as a precaution; because it is a weekend, and crises tend to occur after hours and on weekends. Bridget is not currently, and has not run any fever during this episode, her eyes are clear, she is not coughing, her nasal secretions that are not bloody are clear and do not have an odor, her last bowel movement 3 days ago was small and very dark, and she has not had any episodes of diarrhea or vomiting. Yesterday, the vet had radiographs taken of Bridgets head and chest, and her lungs are clear. There were no obvious anomalies in Her head x-ray. Yesterday. the veterinarian tried to give Bridget a guaifenesin tablet, but it got stuck in the pill-pusher; so Bridget ended up with a partially dissolved tablet in her mouth. She proceeded to salivate and foam profusely and experienced acute respiratory distress because she was unable to swallow well enough to keep from choking and inhaling saliva. The vet had us stay for an extra 30 more minutes to make sure she would recover and at least be able to breathe through her mouth. They were getting oxygen ready when I saturated a paper towel with water and washed the residue out of her mouth. I'm an old cat mom that has learned through experience that if at all possible, every pilling works best if a little water is given first, the pill is covered in butter, coconut oil, or similar, and a chaser of water is given immediately after pilling to make sure no residue remains in the mouth, and the pill is close to or completely washed down into the stomach. The veterinarian is primarily a large animal vet, and I felt sorry for Him because he felt so terrible for Bridgett having so much difficulty. It happens! He's a good doctor, and He learned from the experience. Bridget's excess salivation improved quickly after her mouth-rinsing; however, Bridgett's nose has been bleeding and has remained almost completely blocked since the pilling dysfunction. Bridget is a very diminutive 7-pound version of a Maine Coon kitty, likely due to her tough start in life. She has been an indoor cat since I rescued her 6+ years ago and has always been remarkably healthy. The two veterinarians that have examined Bridget are stumped, as to what could be causing Bridget's severe congestion and epistaxis, as am I. My husband and I, and our always indoor 14 divine felines moved into our present old home (built in 1927) in May of last year. The house is located in a very humid forested area of Texas, and we do have a periodic problem with air-born mold spore proliferation. We do use UV/HEPA air purifiers throughout the house, but feral kitties tend to hang out and hide under furnishings where there is poor air circulation. Could an upper respiratory fungal reaction and/or fungal infestation cause nose bleeding in felines; or could feline herpes possibly be the cause? Bridget was tested for FIV, and other feline diseases ~6 years ago when she was spayed, and the results were all negative. Could there have been a mistake in those lab results? Lysine appeared to offer some improvement to Bridget's congestion initially, but I have been so focused on Her hydration and rescue nutrition that I have neglected to add any Lysine to her current daily routine supplement and hydration. I purchased a bottle of antifungal prescription medication ("Itrafungol") from our veterinarian yesterday, and I will be giving Bridget the first dose after I give her a dose of the high-nutrition/high-calorie liquid, and let Her stomach settle a bit afterward. Both veterinarians and I are completely stumped as to what could be causing Bridget's symptoms. Do you have any ideas on what may be causing chronic feline epistaxis without a fever present??? Do you have any tips on the best way to supplement daily caloric and nutritional requirements for a cat that has great difficulty breathing and swallowing pills and thick liquids without choking due to viscous sinus/nasal secretions? Is there a safe, effective, and non-stressful way to help clear a cat's nasal and sinus pasages? Is there a way to encourage a cat to sneeze to clear nasal congestion on their own??? I sincerely appreciate any insight and assistance you can offer!!! BTW: no veterinarian in our town has the equipment to scope inside a cat's nasal passages, so that procedure has not been performed; and I'm not sure any vet in our accessible area has that type of equipment either.

Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/cat/symptom/why-is-my-cat-bleeding-from-the-nose

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Breadstick
tabby
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Upper Respiratory Infection
Bleeding from nose

My cat has a chronic upper respiratory infection. Recently I've noticed blood around her nose, and in her snot when she's sneezing. When I took her to the vet, they gave her a shot and things cleared up for a while. The past few days she's picked up bleeding from the nose again. Should I be more concerned, or should I listen to what the vet told me which is that it's gonna happen and there's not a lot I can do?

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Lola
British short hair
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Nose bleed
Sneezing
pain when eating

Medication Used

antibiotics
Anti inflammatory

My cat Lola just a week ago started sneezing blood, after a day of this we decided to take her to the vet as her eyes were drowsy and did not look good at all. The vet found her teeth were rotten and she suspected she had mouth disease but couldn’t inspect further as Lola was in too much pain with her touching her mouth. We decided to put her on antibiotics for the time being before putting her under anaesthetic for a mouth inspection (as this would be costly). On the 4th night she had deteriorated and we found her laying spread out on the floor with blood everywhere and she was foaming at the mouth and struggling to breathe also, called the emergency late night vet straight away and he said W thought it would be best to leave her over night as she is probably just trying to get comfortable. Within 15 minutes she had passed away... is it possible this wasn’t from mouth disease? The vet we saw initially didn’t do many other checks, just kind of assumed it was the teeth that was causing the problems from the get go!

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1611 Recommendations
I'm very sorry for the loss of your Lola. It is possible that she had more going on than dental disease, but it can be difficult to assess the cause when there are many things going on, and dental disease was a reasonable thought. Again, I am sorry for your loss.

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Lloyd, brother is Harry
Shorthair
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Not eating but hungry

I think my 9 month old cat was hit by car. He had bloody nose and swollen forehead. He had to breath through his mouth all day. Next day he was able to breath through his nose and clean himself a bit. That evening he drank water. Day 3 and he acts like he wants to eat really bad but he just sniffs the soft and hard food and and meows at me for something else. Still wont eat. Suggestions?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
If you suspect that Lloyd was hit by a car you should visit a Veterinarian for an examination to ensure that there are no signs of long term injuries, internal injuries or brain damage; without examining Lloyd I cannot give him the all clear, the inability to eat may be due to pain from the trauma. Your Veterinarian will make a thorough examination especially of the mouth and will also perform a thorough neurological examination as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Frank
Ragdoll
18 Years
Moderate condition
2 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

sneezing blood
Weeping eyes

My cat has been sneezing blood on and off for a few months. Four weeks ago I smelt infection on his breath but couldn’t get into vet for three days and they put him on antibiotics - he ended up in emergency that night after sneezing a blood clot and then under X-ray they removed a large clot from back of nose but couldn’t see anything wrong.
His blood work is great, kidneys of a kitten (he is 18years old) and the nasal bone structure is in perfect condition - good strong white straight bones.
It seems that when he is put in a stressful situation later that night he sneezes a little blood. I can hear a vibration in his nose and his eyes are weepy (he is a rag doll so not unusual but a little more than normal.
Otherwise he is his adorable self - eating like a lion and everything along with it.
Next step is probably a cat scan but want to see if any advice before take that $$$$ step.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3320 Recommendations
There are various different possible causes for nosebleeds in an older cat at Frank’s age; these may include infections, foreign objects, dental disorders, tumours, clotting disorders among other causes. Obviously due to age and the size of a cat’s nares we are limited with diagnostic options; you need to decide if a CT scan is going to be beneficial for Frank at his age, but I cannot think of any other method of diagnostics at this stage. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you Dr Turner. He is healthy in all other ways with good blood cloating and internal organs. Will speak to a specialist about the CT and try a second course of antibiotics in case it is a left over from infection.
He still has a fair amount of life in him (I am spurred on by my last cat living to 23)

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Dusty
DOMESTIC
3 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Sneezing

I've pulled a piece of grass from my cats nose it was bleeding but all he's done since is sleep. He was sneezing so when I looked that's when I seen something in his nose. I just need to know if it's over and if sleeping is the best thing for him.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1611 Recommendations
I'm not sure if removing the grass will solve the problem for him, or if he will need antibiotics or further care.... if Dusty continues to sleep, doesn't want to eat or seems otherwise not himself, it would be best to have him seen by your veterinarian to make sure that he is okay.

He has been eating. He just seems exhausted. He has literally just had a course of any from the vet last week because of the sneezing and a cold but his temperature was up a bit. I don't know if he inhaled the grass today or if it's been there a while. Thank you for replying.

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klyde
American Short Hair
16 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Nose bleed
Sneezing
Drowsy

i do not know if my cat has a nasal tumor or could be anemic i’m trying to figure out what is wrong, he is old and sneezing blood by it’s not an everyday thing

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1611 Recommendations
Without seeing Klyde, I don't have any way to determine what might be going on with him, unfortunately. Cats can have tumors, allergies, bacterial or fungal infections, or parasites that can cause the signs that you describe. It would be best to have him examined by a veterinarian, as they can look at him, determine what might be going on, and give him any treatment that he may need, as sneezing blood can't be comfortable for him!

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stray cat
stray
7 Months
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Nose bleed
Breathing Difficulty

black stray kitten 7 month old cause excess nose bleed at night and no vet in my area living with us since birth please tell us what to do will she able to survive

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1611 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining this kitten, I'm not sure what might be wrong with her, but kittens are commonly affected by parasites, bacterial and fungal infections, and respiratory infections. She may have one ot those things that is causing her nose to bleed, and would need to be seen by a veterinarian to be assessed and treated. I hope that she is okay.

thanks for opinion now cat has been seen by vet and the cause is wound due to falling from height or something like this but now after coming home cat is now able to drink or eat food. cat sneezes when she eat or drink but she want to eat but not able to.

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