What are Egg Yolk Allergies?

Allergies are not exclusive to humans, and our canine companions can be troubled by them as well. An allergy occurs when the immune system of the body responds aggressively to a perceived threat, in this case, egg yolk. Canines who develop food allergies, such as allergies to egg yolk, can experience itchy and inflamed skin as well as chronic conditions such as ear infections, gas, and wheezing. Although rare, anaphylactic shock may also strike. Dogs who have demonstrated allergies to other foods are more likely to develop allergies to new food sources, such as egg yolk.

Egg are high on the list of likely food allergens for dogs. An egg yolk allergy is an over-reaction of your dog's immune system to the proteins present in the egg yolk.

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Egg Yolk Allergies Average Cost

From 372 quotes ranging from $200 - $800

Average Cost

$400

Symptoms of Egg Yolk Allergies in Dogs

The symptoms of an allergy to egg yolk could include: 

  • Bald patches
  • Chronic ear infections
  • Chronic gas
  • Chronically inflamed feet
  • Coughing 
  • Face rubbing
  • Hives
  • Obsessive licking
  • Paw biting
  • Poor growth 
  • Skin infections
  • Skin rashes
  • Vomiting
  • Wheezing

Food allergies can also cause anaphylactic shock in dogs. Symptoms of anaphylactic shock should be considered an emergency and your pet should be rushed to the nearest veterinary hospital. In addition to common signs of an allergic reaction, your pet may also exhibit:

  • Cold limbs
  • Coma
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Elevated heart rate
  • Excessive drooling
  • Low blood pressure
  • Pale gums
  • Seizures
  • Sudden diarrhea
  • Sudden vomiting

Types

Often animals that are allergic to egg yolk are allergic to the whites and shells as well. Allergies to eggs are often inclusive of all kinds of bird eggs, including chicken eggs. Egg proteins may be listed several ways on an ingredient list for prepared human or canine foods, such as: 

  • Simplesse
  • Surimi Trailblazer
  • Vitellin
  • Whole egg
  • Fat substitutes
  • Mayonnaise
  • Meringue
  • Meringue powder
  • Albumin
  • Lipovitellin
  • Cholesterol-free egg substitute
  • Dried egg
  • Dried egg solids
  • Egg wash
  • Egg white
  • Egg yolk
  • Ovalbumin
  • Ovoglobulin
  • Ovovitelia
  • Ovovitellin
  • Powdered eggs  

The following products may also have egg in them, and may trigger symptoms to flare up by ingestion or by simple contact. 

  • Artificial flavoring
  • Antihistamine
  • Baked goods
  • Immunizations
  • Fur garments
  • Lecithin
  • Natural flavoring
  • Nougat
  • Pasta
  • Photographic film
  • Shampoos
  • Unwashed printed natural fabrics
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Causes of Egg Yolk Allergies in Dogs

Allergies are due to an unwarranted defensive response to a protein that your dog’s immune system considers an invasive substance. It is estimated that around 60-70% of the immune system cells reside within the digestive system. The process of digestion breaks down the food we eat into their smallest parts, which are known as amino acids. These amino acids are then absorbed by white blood cells called enterocytes. When these proteins are not properly broken down during digestion, the enterocytes see them as intruders and launch an attack. Over time the response of these cells to the allergen, in this case, egg yolk, becomes more aggressive, and symptoms intensify.

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Diagnosis of Egg Yolk Allergies in Dogs

The symptoms caused by the allergic reaction will prompt your veterinarian to collect skin scrapings from affected areas for cutaneous cytology. Cutaneous cytology is the microscopic evaluation of dermal cells to search for nuisances like mites, yeast infections, or signs of disease. If no underlying cause is apparent, then a food allergy may be suspected. In order to confirm the allergy, an elimination diet is usually implemented to confirm the diagnosis. An elimination diet involves replacing the diet your dog is currently eating with either a reduced ingredient or hypoallergenic commercial food or a diet of bland human food.

When choosing an appropriate replacement diet, all of the ingredients in the dog’s current food should be avoided. In many cases it may be the entire food family that your pet is reacting to, so switching from a chicken diet to a mammalian source such as rabbit may have better results than switching to another avian species like duck. A properly implemented elimination diet will cause the signs of allergy to cease.

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Treatment of Egg Yolk Allergies in Dogs

It can take several weeks for the elimination diet to reveal that egg yolk is the allergen and during this time your pet may experience lingering symptoms. Use of corticosteroids may ease the swelling and itching of the skin, but they also make it harder to determine the source of the allergic reaction by masking the signs and symptoms.  For this reason, many veterinarians prefer to complete the elimination diet before applying any medications to address the symptoms.

Antibiotics may be prescribed to ward off any secondary skin infections as are commonly seen with food allergies. Once the allergen has been identified as egg or egg yolk, you will want to avoid feeding that ingredient to your dog. If anaphylactic shock symptoms are showing, your pet will be admitted to the veterinary hospital as soon as possible for an injection of epinephrine, as well as for support treatments, such as IV fluids and oxygen therapy.

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Recovery of Egg Yolk Allergies in Dogs

Allergies to foods like egg yolk are not curable, but the symptoms will dissipate if the allergen is cut from your dog’s diet. Any exposure to egg yolk or egg protein can incite a relapse, so care must be taken with which treats are offered to the canine as well as flavorings agents that may include egg. Unfortunately, if your canine has had an allergic response to one type of food they are more likely to develop an allergy to the ingredients in the replacement diet over time as well. The approach to combat this situation varies within the veterinary profession, with some doctors advocating that your pet remains on a single source of food, while others maintain that a steady rotation of three of four novel protein foods is optimal.

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Egg Yolk Allergies Average Cost

From 372 quotes ranging from $200 - $800

Average Cost

$400

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Egg Yolk Allergies Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Rana

dog-breed-icon

French Bulldog

dog-age-icon

2 Years

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Serious severity

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28 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Hotspots
Itching
Ear Lesion
Hair Loss

We struggled with figuring out what was wrong with our dog for about 3 or 4 months, which now seems relatively short looking back on it, but seemed like an eternity then. She came to us with giardia (intestinal parasite) so had fluctuating diarrhea and thus we initially thought that was the cause for all her issues. Once that cleared up (after many vet visits and a lot of medication) we realized she suffered from what seemed like a chronically infected ear, we unknowingly assumed it was mites and treated her for that (since she came with one problem we thought the mites probably came from the crappy place where we adopted her too). Turns out it was actually an irritation from the her allergies, which we didn't know she had. After a lot of internet research, I started with an elimination diet. Beef went out first, and we noticed her ear got a lot better. She still kept slowly but steadily developing a bald patch on her back, so we started eliminating chicken as well. Little did I know (or actually think twice...) to stop feeding her eggs too (I know, stupid to keep feeding her eggs while she was off chicken, but I wanted her to eat something nutritious, and since we were cooking for her I thought it was an excellent source of "probably" a different protein). She kept gnawing at her paws and developing hotspots here and there, usually around the neck. Since she was a new puppy, we couldn't easily connect this to eggs, her health and behavior had been abnormal from the start, and I read about her symptoms as being related to environmental allergies a lot (and this was her first spring...). She would also sneeze and have reverse sneezing bouts once in a while, which was quite unnerving. One day, after feeding her a raw egg (first ever 'pure' egg fed to her) and seeing her immediate itching and sneezing reaction, I realized... and wanted to slap myself. She's been off all these things ever since, only eating a stew of sorts prepared with lamb, goat, salmon mixed with things like oats, sweet potato, rice, etc as well as olive oil and nutritional yeast. Strangely enough she's completely ok with dairy (if you have a dog allergic to eggs and want to feed them cheese here and there please double check it doesn't contain egg byproducts, same with every other snack). After a few months of steady progress (no itching, hair returning, no hotspots, no sneezing, shinier hair, almost no reverse sneezing, healthy ears, etc. and noticeably better energy) I gave her pork to test that as well: no good, ear issues immediately flared up. Months later we tested for turkey and she got itchy almost instantly. Later I heard from the vet that most likely all poultry will do this. However, she said that since it is the protein in food which causes an allergy, foods containing only poultry *fat* are actually ok (such as the one I feed her as an additional thing: Dutch-brand Hypoallergenic BioFood with lamb, which contains poultry fat -- very recommendable). Two years later, she's as healthy as a French Bulldog can be, without breathing or temperature-regulating issues, and an amazing coat. I don't know what she's gotten into recently but she's developed hotspots and a terrible itch again (daily scratching and paw gnawing), it's been going on for a week and a half, we did change her food but since we had been traveling with her we changed her food quite often over the past month, and since we know what she can eat we were actually doing a pretty good job, no allergies at all. It could be a coindicental overlap, but she started getting sneezing bouts after falling into what she thought was a shallow outdoor surface full of foxtails (the type that doesn't stick, but has a lot of fluffy hairs), it's been sort of getting better, but I wonder what happened. My question is: can an already very allergic dog develop a new allergy? Can the hypoallergenic food actually be causing trouble? When should I see the vet for a hotspot -- after a week or two since it's developed? I also wrote my issue as accurately as possible since I've profited so much from people doing so in the past, so thanks to the drs for answering and to the posters for posting! Best wishes, S

Sept. 8, 2018

Rana's Owner

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Bandit

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Rat Terrier

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4 Years

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Mild severity

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4 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dog vomits every time we give him eggs from our chickens? Could he be allergic to the eggs? That is the only thing that happens when he eats them. It usually happens within 10 min or so after eating.

June 10, 2018

Bandit's Owner

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4 Recommendations

It is possible that Bandit has an egg allergy, I know it sounds simple but it is as easy as stopping feeding him the eggs. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

June 11, 2018

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Egg Yolk Allergies Average Cost

From 372 quotes ranging from $200 - $800

Average Cost

$400

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