Inguinal Hernia Average Cost

From 12 quotes ranging from $800 - 4,000

Average Cost

$2,300

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What is Inguinal Hernia?

Inguinal hernias can have varying severity, but all involve the enlargement of the inguinal canal and the risk of abdominal contents spilling out through the canal, or opening in the dog’s groin. Although not the sole cause, inguinal hernias are genetic conditions and are most commonly found in the Pekinese, Basset Hound, Cairn Terrier, Cocker Spaniel, Miniature Pinscher, Lhasa Apso, English Springer Spaniel, Collie, Bull Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Pomeranian, Maltese, West Highland Terrier and Basenji breeds.

The inguinal canal is an opening of the muscle wall in a dog’s groin, which exists in order for blood vessels and spermatic cord pass to the testicles in male dogs and for the vaginal process to pass through for female dogs. An inguinal hernia occurs when the opening of the inguinal canal widens, allowing abdominal contents to bulge out of or pass through.

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Symptoms of Inguinal Hernia in Dogs

The most remarkable symptom of an inguinal hernia is the protrusion itself, which appears as swelling on one or both sides of a dog’s groin and can be exacerbated by certain activities such as standing, barking or straining. However, additional symptoms correlate with severity of the condition, and they include:

  • Noticeable pain
  • Warmth at the swollen site
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Malaise or depression
  • Frequent attempts at urination
  • Bloody urine
Types
Reducible

Typically smaller in size, a reducible inguinal hernia is one in which the protrusion is simply abdominal lining or fat and may safely be pushed back into the abdomen by a veterinarian. In the majority of cases, the only symptom displayed is swelling of the site itself.

Irreducible

An irreducible inguinal hernia is one in which part of one or more abdominal organs are protruding from the opening. If your dog exhibits symptoms beyond swelling at the site, it may be indicative of an irreducible hernia. This type of an inguinal hernia is more severe, as the affected organ(s) involved may become entrapped, compromising their function. In severe cases, blood flow may be completely cut-off from an organ, leading to tissue death. This is known as organ strangulation.

Causes of Inguinal Hernia in Dogs

Inguinal hernias are both congenital, or present at birth, and acquired. While the majority of inguinal hernias are congenital, acquired inguinal hernias are caused by obesity, physical trauma, and pregnancy. Knowing if hernias run in your dog’s bloodline can help you identify a problem early.

Diagnosis of Inguinal Hernia in Dogs

The veterinarian typically diagnoses inguinal hernias easily upon palpation of the groin area. In irreducible inguinal hernias, x-rays and/or ultrasounds are required in order to determine if there is any organ entrapment, so, the extent. Irreducible inguinal hernias commonly involve complications of the uterus, intestines or bladder.

Treatment of Inguinal Hernia in Dogs

In rare cases, you and the veterinarian may decide not to treat very small, reducible inguinal hernias. However, this is unlikely, as trauma, pregnancy, activity and weight gain may exacerbate the opening and cause complications. In most cases, particularly with irreducible hernias, prompt surgery will be required. The veterinarian will remove any scar tissue that has formed at the site, push any entrapped organs back into the abdominal cavity, and use stitches to reduce the inguinal canal to its proper size.

It's vitally important that both diagnosis and treatment transpire swiftly, as untreated irreducible hernias can lead to strangulated organs, tissue death, and infection. In some strangulation cases, the dead or affected section of tissue may be removed, and the organ or intestine may be repaired with tissues. The success of this procedure depends heavily upon what tissue and how much tissue is affected.

Recovery of Inguinal Hernia in Dogs

If your treatment did not involve surgery, it’s important to keep close tabs on the site for any changes. If you notice any changes or issues, investigate veterinary attention.

If your dog underwent inguinal hernia surgery, carefully follow the veterinarians' follow-up instructions to guarantee full recovery. Be sure to give your pet plenty of time and space to rest. Limit activity to letting your dog outside only to relieve itself. It will be tough, but do not allow your dog to run or jump for ten days to allow the wound time to heal. In the first few days post surgery, it's normal for your pet to experience sleepiness, lack of coordination, whimpering or crying, and coughing. Expect this behavior, but closely watch your pet for additional signs of stress or pain or the continuation of expected signs beyond four days.

Check the incision site daily for drainage and redness, as they are signs of infection, and you will need to see your veterinarian as soon as possible. If the incision doesn’t appear to be holding, or if any intestinal material protrudes through the incision, seek attention immediately. Careful feeding is very important the first few days after surgery, so monitor your dog while feeding small portions. In the case of vomiting, remove and withhold food for twenty-four hours and consult the veterinarian if your dog cannot hold down food after that period.

Inguinal Hernia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Gus
Maltipoo
5 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Loss of Appetite

I recently adopted a what i thought was a 8 week old teacup maltipoo, i took him to the vet to find out he was barely 5 weeks old - and has an Inguinal Hernia, he is going to the bathroom fine and was just told to watch him, but has had loss in apatite and very skinny only 1.6 pounds right now. He had a great apatite when i got him a week ago - but now i can barely get him to eat half of his bowl of food - we need him to put on weight.

He doesn't seem to be in pain right now and is very happy and playful & waddles when he walks i think due to the hernia.

the vet wants to wait until he is 4 months old to preform the surgery with his neuter but i am scared to wait that long, do you think this is too long to wait?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations
Most cases of hernias (inguinal or umbilical) don’t cause much of a hassle and it is normal to combine the two surgeries at neutering, however you should keep a close eye on Gus and ensure that the hernia isn’t causing any health issues. If there is a loss of appetite, it may be related to the hernia but your Veterinarian would need to be consulted about that if it is new; if Gus isn’t eating you should try to feed him a smooth wet food mixed with water using a syringe bit by bit allowing him to lap it up, it may help boost his food intake. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lulu
Chihuahua
9 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

none
No

Medication Used

Rimadyl

My dog had surgery for her inguinal hernia and a spay and she's been resting well and doesn't look sad or anything but after three days I was told to take off bandages that they wrap around after surgery. I did and she still has the bump from the hernia. It's like they could only reduce it a few and just spayed her. But they didn't say anything about only reducing it by a little. Could it be possible that it will shrink down as she heals more or is she always going to have a noticeable hernia?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
852 Recommendations
You'll need to contact your veterinarian and ask this question, as I was not there for the surgery, and cannot see the incision at this time. There may be some swelling or scar tissue from the surgery, but your veterinarian will be able to give you a better explanation.

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Pancha
Chihuahua
7 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Redness
Swelling
Bruise

Medication Used

Cephalexin
Metacam

My dog just had hernia surgery this past Friday and we got her home Saturday. They gave me some antibiotics and pain medicine for her. When we came back from work Sunday morning, she had ripped off her cone and I’m assuming she licked it. We took her back to the vet first thing Monday morning and they told me she irritated it. They said it was good though since there was no drainage, but it was very red/bruised and swollen. They gave her laser therapy and it looked like the swelling had gone down some. I have to go back on Wednesday and Friday to do more laser therapy. I’m looking at her incision site now and it looks like the redness/bruising is spreading upwards. She seems completely normal; she’s walking, eating, and drinking water. I just want to make sure she is okay.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
852 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If she is acting normally and doing well otherwise, it may just be bruised as a result of surgery and post op trauma. Since you are taking her back tomorrow for laser therapy, it would be a good idea to have them reassess it at that time, to make sure that the bruising isn't more than is expected. I hope that all goes well for her.

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suzie
miniature schnauzr
6 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

big lump

Medication Used

none

fatty tissue lump how would a fatty lump fatty tissue be diognosed.took dog to have lump checked. was told fatty tissue only. no tests was done, can fatty tissue be diognosed just by touch alone

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
852 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. No, fatty tissue lumps (lipomas) cannot be diagnosed by touch. We typically take a small sample with a needle (fine needle aspirate) and look at the cells under the microscope to diagnose them. Lipomas do have a characteristic appearance and consistency, but to know for sure, the test would need to be done.

Do you suggest that i should seek* a second opinion?

Hello! I took my Dog (male, neutred, 15 lbs, 2 yrs old - Bichon/yorkie mix) to a vet for similar issue. He has these bilateral lumps in his groin, which are not visually visible unless his abdomen is palpatted. Vet dismissed it saying that its just fat. But i couldnt stand up to her at that point by saying since when fat is such lumpy because i wasnt aware of dogs having to have lipomas or inguinal hernia. Do you suggest I seeking a second opinion?

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Jasmine
Shih-Tzu
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

lack of appetite

Hello, My 1 year old Shih Tzu mix has an umbilical and an inguinal hernia. Today I took her in to be spayed and hernias repaired, but I noticed that there is still a bulge in her groin area where the inguinal hernia is and no incision in that area. Could the vet have done the repairs through the same incision opening that was used to spay her? The umbilical are has an incision and stitches. Also the spay area.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
852 Recommendations
Thank you for contacting us about Jasmine. Typically, an inguinal hernia and an umbilical hernia are located in two entirely different locations, and it would be very challenging to access both areas through one incision. It would be worth a phone call to your veterinarian to make sure that the inguinal hernia wasn't forgotten - perhaps when they went in to surgery, the hernia wasn't obvious as she would have been on her back.

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Ginger
Mixed Chihuahua
13 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

My 13 year old female chihuahua has a groin mass or hernia. She also has a slight heart murmur. Can't afford the surgery. She acts and eats and potty normal. It's gone from the size of a lemon to a grapefruit in 2 months. How will I know when it's time to put her down. I don't want her to suffer. But I am scared it may rupture and she would have a horrible painful death and that would kill me. I just want what's best for her. But putting her down while she seems okay seems heartless too. What should I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations
I cannot recommend that you put down Ginger if she is in good spirits apart from the mass, you need to decide when you are ready to take the last journey with her. It is never easy to decide to put down a loved one especially if you believe that there is possibly a surgery or fix for the problem. I would check to see if you have any charity clinics or nonprofits in your area which may be able to help you with surgical options; some charity clinics will do the surgery (if it is an inguinal hernia) for around $455 whilst other options may be cheaper but you would need to check around. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you. I've already been told that the surgery will run around 3000.00...I took her to Value Vet yesterday and they agree with you. As long as she doesn't seem to be suffering, just watch the mass for bruising or hardness or scabbing...that's when it will be time. .😢

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Saga
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Thank you so much for your advice,Saga had surgery yesterday,vet found hard growth on abdominal muscle(like a marble,red in colour)apparently it wasn't hernia at all.Her blood test came back fine except lipase enzyme was low as always on her previous blood tests.I can't understand,months after her hernia surgery that lump was small and I was able to push that back in until few days ago when it grew considerably.I wonder what that could be?could it be tumour or something?She was eating,drinking,having normal stools and she is really happy dog

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations
With this type of mass, it would be best to have it sent off for histopathology so that a diagnosis can be made and it can be determined if any follow up treatment may be necessary. Without examining the mass and cutting it open, I wouldn’t want to guess on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Saga
Yorkshire Terrier
2 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

I have a two years old yorkie girl,who after many surgeries ended up with hernia where her belly button is,Last November our vet corrected it using mesh but hernia came back after just one month after operation.Two days ago I noticed that hernia is enlarged and can't be pushed in.I immediately took her to the vet and she will have another surgery tomorrow.I would like to know is this common(hernia to came back)?or is it something wrong with my dog?Vet is going to take biopsy of her muscle tomorrow,I'm just really concerned.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations
Umbilical hernias have a low recurrence rate, recurrence is usually due to over activity and failure of the surgical site. Some dogs just keep having recurring hernias; it is important to restrict movement and prevent straining whilst defecating as increased intra abdominal pressure can cause recurrence too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chloe
Yorkshire Terrier
7 Years
Moderate condition
2 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Bulge on her left lower area

My 7 year old yorkie is about to get her 3rd inguinal hernia surgery repair. (Birth, 5 now at 7)How risky is it for her to get another surgery. Im nervous. What am i doing wrong.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Inguinal hernia surgery does have a recurrence rate with some dogs requiring numerous surgeries. If your Veterinarian hasn’t already attempted, a synthetic mesh can be placed at the hernia site to strengthen the hernia repair; if a hernia has occurred on both sides (in the past), it may be worth repairing both sides with the mesh at the next surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lia
Australian Cattle Dog (Blue Heeler)
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

recent dislocated hip
Appearance of large bump in groin

Medication Used

Tremodal
antibiotic

Hello,

My dog Lia unfortunately dislocated her hip and had large punctures in her opposite leg. The vet successfully completed a closed reduction to the hip and we have almost hit 2 weeks with her in a Ehmer sling. So far, we've had 3 Xrays and it is still in. (knock on wood)

At her last appt, we noticed a soft but softball size lump in her pelvic area. Lia (who is spayed) has always been very touchy (i.e. you touch her paw and she is quick to pull away bc it tickles) but when we touched it she didn't flinch. It gave the appearance that she is not in pain.
She has been able to go to the restroom and has been eating regularly.

The vet mentioned it could be a hernia but said since she wasn't in any pain maybe its not one. With the X-ray we really couldn't see it. The vet said to just keep an eye on it, we have another vet appointment (with our reg doc not emergency) and will have them check it out.

With this information, can it be a hernia if so, is it caused by traumatic events like dislocating a hip? What should we be looking for and is surgery always necessary?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations
It is possible that a traumatic event which caused the hip dislocation also caused the formation of an inguinal hernia; without examining Lia it is hard to say whether or not if it is a hernia or not but if it is in that location then it is highly suggestive. Some dogs like with hernias their whole life without incident whilst others may have complications which may require emergency care; I generally recommend correction of any hernia as prevention is generally cheaper that the cure. It is important to keep an eye of for changes in size, colour and temperature. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Buck
Beagle
4-5 yrs
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia in groan

Okay, I have a 4 year old Beagle. He has never been bred, he has come across some females tat was in season and did a itttkw but has never been fully"knotted up"..So my question is,. If he has a in inguineal hernia(since the inguineal tube and the sperm tube is the same thing) if we bred him would re hernia go away? And would the hernia come from him not being bred and the sperm tube is kind of "clogged". Please let me know something.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations
Inguinal hernias and breeding as you are describing are not related; treatment would be surgical correction of the hernia and castration; inguinal hernias occur due to the inguinal canal being open allowing contents from the abdomen into the canal, breeding with him will not solve this. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chrissy
Yorkshire Terrier
13 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent Urination
Swelling
heat

My yorkie who is house trained has started peeing on the carpet 5 or 6 times a day. She has had an inguinal hernia since we found her, and we have had it worked on once already. It is coming back, having increased in size and begun getting hot again. I am wandering if this might have something have something to do with her peeing, though she is pretty old and we just had a baby so maybe she is just acting out, but the hernia is also pretty bad.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Any hernia that has recurred, grown in size or is hot to the touch should be examined by your Veterinarian; the hernia may be affecting the urinary bladder as well and this is another reason for a visit to your Veterinarian. Without examining Chrissy, I cannot give you much advice; but I would definitely recommend visiting your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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chloe
Yorkshire Terrier
6-7
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

inguinal hernia

Roughly how long should an inguinal hernia surgery take for a 6 year old female yorkie? I am asking this because I dropped my dog off at 9am for hernia repair and it is now 1:30 pm and I called and the vet still has not gotten to my pet. They say pick up is still at 4pm. is this enough time for them to do the surgery and monitor her after? She is also getting teeth cleaned and 5 removed. Do you think this is some hack vet? who can perform a hernia repair, 5 teeth extractions and cleaning in 2.5 hrs and monitor how shes doing afterwards? Should i tell them just dont do it and go else where?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Inguinal hernia surgery usually lasts between 45-90 minutes depending on complexity and based on your previous question ("My 7 year old yorkie is about to get her 3rd inguinal hernia surgery repair... How risky is it for her to get another surgery. I’m nervous. What am i doing wrong.") more time may be needed to secure the hernia site; the teeth extraction may occur at the same time as the hernia surgery although the cleaning should be before or after the surgery. The recovery from anaesthesia and is usually quite rapid with inhalation anaesthesia as animals generally wake up soon after the gas is switched off; if you have concerns, the decision to opt out of the surgery or choose another Veterinarian is down to you. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chloe
Yorkshire Terrier
6-7
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

inguinal hernia
Hernia

Medication Used

Carprofen

My dog just had an inguinal hernia repaired. What should it look like the days following? It appears to be more swollen prior to surgery and day 1 it was not red. now day 2 its a bright pinkish red and swollen. she doesnt appear to be in pain and shes moving fine eating and drinking. should i take her to a hospital or is his normal considering she just had surgery?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Some swelling after surgery is normal; however if it is enlarged, red or leaking fluid you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. A normal looking wound looks something like the link below. This is Chloe’s third surgery (from your previous questions), so you have some idea of how it looks after surgery; however, if the hernia site was secured with mesh or there was more suturing to keep the hernia closed, there may be more swelling. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
http://www.kongyuensing.com/pic/20090247Chihuahua_Female_Bilateral_Inguinal_Repair_ToaPayohVets.jpg

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Jeffer
Huntaway
11 Years
Mild condition
2 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lump on back side

Hello my Dog is going for his surgery this coming Friday. I'm just curious on what's the possibility of survival. I'm just worried and my vet will not answer.
Thanks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

If Jeffer’s blood results are OK and he is in general good health the risk is minimal; but with anaesthesia there is always a risk, animals may have a reaction to the anaesthetic or there may be unforeseen complications during the surgery (not at the fault of the Surgeon). Whilst all surgery is risky to a small degree, the risks are outweighed by the benefits of the surgery; your Veterinarian won’t answer due to liability issues, and I cannot give you a guarantee that the surgery is risk free it is just a case of the benefits outweighing the risks. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

IF you really care about and want to help your fur baby HAVE HER SPAYED!!! She doesn't need to be having anymore puppies.

I have a question but I can't find where to ask it at. My question is I have a 11 year old female chihuahua and she has an inguinal hernia that she developed after having two puppies. She has had it for over 5 years and it never seemed to bother her at all. But the last time she was in heat I noticed it got way bigger and started to turn blue and after one of the other dogs we had at the time snuck in where she was at and tried to mount her she began screaming. Of course we got that dog out immediately and that boy dog of ours has already been neautered. So no chance if pregnancy thank God. We will never chance her having anymore puppies ever. But after that she wouldn't let us touch her like it hurt her to much. Then she didn't want to eat for a couple days so I had to just give her tiny bits of water and formula threw a syringe to make sure she wouldn't become dehydrated. She couldn't walk without screaming in pain. Then about two days later she was back to her old self and the bleeding lasted a little longer then normal, but it ended and she has seemed fine since. But now I worry about her going into heat again. I want to have surgery done on her to fix the inguinia hernia, but I'm disabled and in a wheelchair and I can't work so I'm on disability for me and my daughter and I just don't have the extra income. But this dog is my life. She has been with me for every surgery Ive had, which is a lot. Like over 82 surgeries and she helps me through my depression. I just resently had to have my leg amputated and she helped me so that I got over that depression real quick because if she can go threw what she is and still be here for me and still be so happy and loving u better believe I'm gonna do the same. I just don't know what to do. I couldn't handle loosing her. Besides my daughter she is my whole world. But I also wonder if through the glory of god I was able to come up with the money for the surgery. Would she be likely to survive that surgery being that she is 11 years old? Also is there a connection as to why she seemed to hurt when in heat and not any other time or was it just strictly the boy dog mounting her for a couple seconds and it just put to much weight on the hernia or possibly it hurt her back and that's what she was screaming from. Because the hernia was more swollen then normal while she was in heat so it may have weighed more and then with the boy dogs weight on top it all just weighed to much for her and hurt her. Well the next time she goes in heat the good thing is she is an only dog now. I moved out. So no chance of any dog bothering her anymore. I want to do whatever I possibly can for her. Please respond back doctor with any advice please. I'm desperate to save her and keep her alive as long as I can. I want her to have the best life possible. She is my guardian angel.

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Mavis
French Bulldog
16 Weeks
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

vulva discharge
inguinal hernia
Lathirgy
Blood in Urine
Frequent Urination

Hi There,

I have a 16 week old female French Bulldog. I had noticed she had a very small amount of white discharge on her vulva when she would pee. So i began wiping her after she would go potty with a warm disposable cloth. She was urinating frequently; say up to 20 times a day. She could pee 4-5 times within a 20 minute time span several times throughout the day. When i noticed this I called the vet to get her in to be seen earlier then scheduled. When I brought her in we noticed a small marble size protrusion around her groin slightly above her vulva on her left side. The operating vet at the office felt it was best for her to go to our local VCA to have an ultrasound as well as a sterile urine sample. I went through with both procedures and am waiting to hear back on the urine. However they could not give me a clear answer from the ultrasound although they believe it is an inguinal hernia. I noticed blood in her urine this morning and have scheduled a visit with another vet for this upcoming Wednesday for a second opinion. She is an all in service vet and has operated of puppy inguinal hernias many times before. Should i be worried that she is waiting until Wednesday? is this too long? i'm willing to do whatever is best for my pup. She seems to be more lethargic then normal but still in great spirits. I don't want her to be uncomfortable. Help!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

An inguinal hernia would be lower down between her legs, a perineal hernia would occur around the anus and vulva, but would be easily diagnosed by rectal palpation (although her size may have made it not possible). The white discharge from the vulva may have been skin fold dermatitis. In cases of hernias, if there isn’t any sign of pain (discomfort yes) and Mavis is still eating, drinking and defecating, it may wait as long as the symptoms don’t progress. If you notice a worsening of symptoms are any other symptoms, visit a Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Daisy
Chihuahua
9weeks
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dog is a chihuahua and 9 weeks old she has inguinal hernia,the person we got her from said her mother had it when she was a puppy and she never got it taken care of ,she said she was doing fine and every thing,we don't really want to take her to the vet she vomited once and pees several times how much would it be if we did and what should we do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

It is always best to have hernias repaired to prevent possible complications as content may pass through the inguinal canal and may become strangled which is a medical emergency. Generally, a soft diet with stool softeners will ensure that there is no straining whilst defecating which may cause further complications and surgical correction at the time of spaying. Cost will vary on a few different factors but in a small dog repair would be relatively low in cost at $500 - $1,500 (in complicated emergency cases more); this is a wide estimate and will vary depending on severity, your location (very important) and whether you visit a Specialist or not. Call your local Veterinarian’s Office or bring it up at your next vaccination visit. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Missy
English bulldog
4 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hyper

My 4 month old puppy had surgery on her inguinal hernia barley 2 days ago, but i cant get her to settle down shes running, jumping and when i try to cage her she goes crazy. What should I do? I dont want her to rip her stiches but she doesn't seem to be in pain.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

It can be difficult to keep an active puppy calm after surgery, if caging makes her crazy you could try placing her in a smaller room like a utility room which doesn’t have the space for her to move too much but hopefully will restrict her movements. Medical sedation isn’t good, but some Veterinarians will give something to calm a dog down. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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No name
Yorkshire Terrier
3mo
Fair condition
2 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

small bulge in groin area

I am purchasing a Yorkshire Terrier puppy. The puppy is a female, 3mo old and weighs about 3lbs. The lady I am buying from said when she took the puppy in to the veternarian he gave her a good bill of health. However, the next day when the lady was petting her she found the inguinal hernia. The puppy is in looks very healthy and happy. The lady called the vet back and he said since the puppy is so small the surgery should wait until the puppy is spad, which would be another 3mo. May I please havr your thoughts on this. I am getting the puppy in Colorado and taking her to California.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Inguinal hernias are uncommon in female puppies, but may occur. Inguinal hernias, like all hernias, run the risk of strangulating the contents that have passed through which become a medical emergency. The hernia may wait for the age of six months when she will be spayed, but complications beforehand may occur. Feeding a wet diet and stool softeners will help her pass her stool without straining too much and increasing the intra abdominal pressure and possibly causing further complications. Ultimately, surgical correction will be required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Puppy
French Bulldog
8 Weeks
Serious condition
2 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

very thin

I went to visit a puppy that I am about to acquire in a week and it looked very malnourished. When I picked up the dog, I quickly noticed it had an Inguinal hernia that looked pretty severe on both sides of the groin. The breeder did not notice it until I pointed it out. She also hasn't been eating much. Does this sound like a pretty severe hernia that could affect her health now/in the future? Should I reconsider choosing this puppy and go with another one?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Inguinal hernias can be unilateral or bilateral and reducible or irreducible; this can be a serious condition where abdominal content (intestines, bladder) can pass through the opening. Some small inguinal hernias resolve themselves but usually surgical correction is required. Symptoms are usually loss of appetite, straining, urinary problems and pain; I would seriously consider the purchase of this puppy given the symptoms you have described, the severity of the hernia would determine the general health and possible risk of complications until she is old enough for surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Shopie
Maltese
9 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Walking tenderly
peeing a lot outside

Hello I have a nine-year-old Maltese poodle who has collapsing trachea and Inguinal hernia we keep a good eye on it put it back in place just like our vet told us but now she has been showing signs of pain when she walks. We are trying to find other Solutions besides surgery do you have any suggestions we can do we don't want to put her down

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

The problem with inguinal hernias are their location which places them in a bad place for when a dog is walking. Surgery is the treatment of choice (as I am sure you know) but for management, it is very difficult to determine as the size of the hernia and other factors make it difficult to manage; some people like to bandage the area but it is very difficult to do well and may lead to further complication if not done properly. Otherwise, restricting movement is the best method of management which means no walks, no playing or excitement which may aggravate the hernia. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Doggy
Jack Russell
5
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Swelling

I have a dog that has an inguinal hernia. Are there available reversal options where his scrotom can go back to it's original state? He was in a car accident and the veterinarians had overlooked this before giving him back to us after his leg operation we had no idea about it until we noticed it on our own that he had an abnormal swelling.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

If the trauma was recent and the scrotum is stretched, it may reduce overtime; otherwise, some of the scrotal skin maybe removed to make the area more cosmetically appealing but as Veterinarians we tend to focus more on healing than appearance, you should speak with your Veterinarian about the options you have. Also, if you haven’t already, have Doggy neutered as it will reduce the risk of prostate disorders and eliminate the risk of testicular cancer. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Max
Corgi mix
10
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Pressure

My 10 year old Corgi mix about 18 lbs has a ingunial hernia ,eating find having a lot of pressured produceng small pieces of poop. No spaded

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Most probably Max would need corrective surgery since the hernia is causing him to strain whilst defecating; the straining will exasperate the hernia. You would need to your Veterinarian about management or surgery including neutering as it will prevent possible problems in the future. Until you see your Veterinarian, feeding a moist diet with stool softeners will allow Max to defecate more easily. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Might as well spay & neuter while under anesthesia

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Rosie
5 Weeks
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

We have purchased a new pug cross jack Russell pup and can bring it home this week , however the breeder just notified us that she has an inguinal hurnia and may need surgery when she is bigger, approx 4 months old. The breeder said we could get surgery done at same time as desexing and it would cost an extra $200 on top of desex cost to remove the hernia. The breeder offered us $ 200 off original sale price of the pup. How accurate is the advised cost of this procedure? Is there ongoing health problems for the dog after surgery? Would it be advised to not purchase this pup.?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

There is no reason not to buy a pup with a hernia; once the hernia has been resolved they will have a full normal life (we just recommend not to breed such animals). Some Veterinarians would charge extra for the hernia correction, some wouldn’t it is down to your Veterinarian. Prices can vary by Veterinary Practice and location etc… $200 to $400 is the usual additional cost if applied to the cost of neutering. I would recommend you call a Veterinarian in your area to ask them specifically their policy and then return to the breeder and advise them of the cost if different. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hello. My husband and I rescued a cocker spaniel 3/19/2016. We noticed that she had a bulge under her belly, and she was soon diagnosed with an inguinal hernia. We did not know her history, but the vet thinks she was born with it. She had surgery to correct it shortly after we rescued her. I'm always worried that if she exercises much it will tear and come back. What is a safe amount of exercise for her?

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Little Pup
Rhodesian Ridgeback
9 days
Moderate condition
3 found helpful
Moderate condition

One of my newborn puppies has an inguinal hernia. Breed is Rhodesian Ridgeback. She was very small at birth but now at 9 days old is gaining weight. The hernia was checked by our vet after birth and he said wait and see if she survives. In the last day it has grown a lot more. What should we do? She currently weighs 330gm. Her litter mates are 550gm +.
Many thanks, Esther

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2305 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Hernia’s usually fall into one of two categories; reducible and non reducible. In a non reducible hernia I would be concerned about the growth over time. Usually Veterinarian’s prefer to operate on older puppies (over twelve weeks) but if there is risk to the health of your puppy, surgery would be warranted earlier (if you are willing to go down that route). It is worth noting that there is a higher chance of occurrence on the opposite side, so if she does have surgery; get the other side stitched up to be on the safe side. Overall check her weight, food consumption and look for any signs of pain; if she continues to eat and gain weight and has no other clinical signs, you can wait before taking her back to your Veterinarian. If the hernia grows too large, impedes her movement or causes a pain response, you will need to evaluate your options. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hi, I have a three month old chihuahua puppy and she is 2.5 pounds. I went to the vet for a check up and they said she has a hernia, but because it was so small she wouldn't need surgery. She's has this bump for about 2 weeks now. What should I do now?

My dog has a hernia, she's had it for about 2 years now. She had one removed about 5 years ago and another grew on the other side. She's already 12 years old. What's the likelihood of her making it through surgery?

We took our puppy ( shihtzu) for his last vet check and they found a scrotal hernia. He needed surgery the following day. Unfortunately he did not make it through the surgery. He did well during it but when it came to waking him up he had a cardiac arrest. One of the most heartbreaking things we have had to go through. He was such a gorgeous little boy. I understand " these things happen" but I urge people to do some research into surgeries that vets advise you of. I can't help but feel that if I had said no to the surgery my milo would still be here today.

hi my dog is a chihuahua and have a inguinal hernia she is 10 years old now but when she was 7 we take her to the vet and they told us they cant operate on her because of the slim chance shell get to survive bow that she's 10>years old the swelling got bigger that she cant even poop properly idont want to take her to the vet because of the slim chance she'll get but i still down want to put her down can you suggest any home remedies ?

So sorry, I am fostering a mom and the pups she had and the smallest has a very large inguinal hernia. He is poltdactyl too (6 toes). U do worry as his appetite is much less than the others. I do not have cost to worry about as the shelter takes care of it
..but it is all very nerve racking.

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