Iris Atrophy Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $300 - 3,500

Average Cost

$1,200

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What is Iris Atrophy?

The colored tissue in the eye that surrounds the pupil is called the iris. Degeneration of the iris in dogs is clinically referred to as atrophy of the iris, and it’s a relatively common condition that can be a normal response to aging, or be the result of inflammation, injury or disease. This condition in its primary form does not hinder or diminish the eyesight of dogs.

Iris atrophy is the result of either chronic inflammation or high intraocular pressure. Many cases end with glaucoma, there is a direct correlation with breed, commonly small breed dogs such as miniature schnauzers.

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Symptoms of Iris Atrophy in Dogs

  • Anisocoria (uneven pupil size)
  • Dull appearance in the color of the eye
  • Change in shape of the pupil
  • Mild sensitivity to bright light
  • Holes in the iris (appear as small black specks)
  • Fixed and dilated pupil
  • Iris thinning
  • Translucency of the iris
Types
  • Primary iris atrophy
  • Secondary iris atrophy

Causes of Iris Atrophy in Dogs

  • Primary iris atrophy is a normal response to aging in dogs. This condition is known as senile iris atrophy, and it typically develops in middle-aged and older pets. While it can occur in all breed of dogs, it is most common in smaller breeds such as miniature and toy poodles, chihuahuas and miniature schnauzers.
  • Secondary iris atrophy can be caused by chronic inflammation, such as uveitis, or glaucoma.
  • Ocular trauma caused by blunt or sharp force to the eye can cause a type of injury that leads to secondary iris atrophy.

Diagnosis of Iris Atrophy in Dogs

Before assessing your pet, your veterinarian will want a full medical history of the dog, especially any details surrounding previous eye infections, issues with sensitivity to light, or a prior diagnosis of glaucoma.

Once a thorough history has been documented, your dog will have a physical examination and a battery of tests that may include any or all of the following:

  • Ophthalmology exam - standard eye exam
  • Tonometry - eye pressure test to check for glaucoma
  • Corneal tests, neurological examination and skull x-rays (if the dog has been injured)

Treatment of Iris Atrophy in Dogs

Primary iris atrophy caused by aging needs no treatment. A shrinking and weakening (atrophy) of the iris is a nonreversible condition. Though it may cause your dog’s eyes to take on a new appearance, eyesight will not be diminished in any way.

Secondary iris atrophy that has been caused by disease, such as chronic glaucoma or chronic uveitis, is treated by controlling the underlying disease. Effective treatment for glaucoma or uveitis should bring an immediate halt to iris atrophy.

Secondary iris atrophy caused by trauma may require surgical intervention, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and analgesics.

Recovery of Iris Atrophy in Dogs

Since primary iris atrophy is a normal condition of aging and poses no harm to the dog, there is no treatment or recovery time needed. Your veterinarian will continue to monitor the health of your dog’s eyes during regular yearly check-ups, but the dog need not be restricted from activity in any way.

Secondary iris atrophy recovery time varies, and is entirely dependent on the cause. Dogs with glaucoma, a chronic disease, will need to have their health and eyesight monitored and treated with regularity. Dogs with uveitis, a treatable condition, will require medications to curb inflammation and relieve pain.

Cost of Iris Atrophy in Dogs

Primary degeneration of the iris in dogs requires no treatment, so the only cost involved is that of an office visit with your local veterinarian, a fee which varies greatly from state to state. The cost will vary between $186 and $2,420 based on the amount of treatment required.

Iris Atrophy Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Pookie
Half cocker half minuture sheltie
11
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

My dog has a 1/2 minutes or sheltie 1/2 cocker spaniel and was extremely Healthy until getting a tick parasite which cause nose bleeding And inflammation of his right eye. He recovered quickly from the parasite after a few days in the veterinarian but his I has taken on glaucoma and even though the swelling Has receded A dark Brown to a light cafe Brown. Is this color Something to worry about. The vet said that it would take a month to see if he regained his e
vision And we were hopeful with his retina reappearing but now it is change colors

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Glaucoma is never easy to predict what the outcome will be, especially when it is secondary to other issues. The iris reappearing may be indicative of a reduction in intraocular pressure, but I cannot say for certain. These changes should be seen by your Veterinarian and tonometry will show if there has been an overall reduction in pressure. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Daisy
Australian Shepherd
15.5
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My 15 year old Australian Shepherd has always had 2 light blue eyes. One eyes recently changed (overnight, it seemed) to amberish. The eyes otherwise look normal and don't seem to bother her. Should I be concerned?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Whilst a change in eye colour is normal at around eight to twelve weeks of age in this breed, changes in colour later on in life may be a sign of something serious and should be investigated by your Veterinarian or an Ophthalmologist familiar with Australian Shepherds and their eyes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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ty bone
Bully mix
7 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

loss of sight
black specks in eye

is it possible to slow iris atrophy in old dogs with imflumation we need to know he is the only thing that keeps my mom holding on and he isn't so young

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

There are two types of iris atrophy, primary and secondary; primary is due to aging and is an irreversible condition, secondary iris atrophy may be caused by glaucoma, infection etc… The underlying cause of the inflammation should be determined so that treatment can be directed accordingly which may include topical corticosteroids, antibiotics or immune system suppression in autoimmune causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Belle
Chihuahua Minature Pincher
5 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Pupils are different sizes

My dog, Belle, has only been with me for a couple of weeks. She seems fine most of the time. But in the evenings, her eyes do this weird thing where the pupils will get really and then really, repeatedly- as if they were pulsating. What could cause? Is it causing her pain?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

Problems with iris with it pulsating may be due to high blood pressure, high ocular pressure, head trauma, poisoning and other conditions. It would be best to have your Veterinarian take a look over Belle as her medical history may be non-existent and they can look out for possible causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cobalt
Bully mix
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Dark spot iris

My 2 year old bully breed mix has developed a dark spot on his iris in the last month and a half. He's not sensitive to light, no redness, no eye discharge, and has no change in behavior at all. Completely normal other than the spot. His pupils Are also working normally. What could this be?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations

It sounds like Cobalt has an iris freckle which is usually nothing to worry about, but should be checked by your Veterinarian and monitored for growth or changes. Treatment may be required if the freckle gets too large or causes other problems. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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