Neuropathic Pain Average Cost

From 17 quotes ranging from $3,000 - 6,000

Average Cost

$3,800

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What is Neuropathic Pain?

Research of the neurobiological mechanisms of neuropathic pain is an area of science where the input of human experience is being utilized to help the advancement of care for our animal friends. Neuropathic pain can take many forms, which cannot be described to us by our dogs, such as burning or stabbing. The veterinarian, of which it's important to pick a doctor with some experience in this particular field, will analyze the existence of this chronic pain in your dog by looking at your pet’s history, and checking causes like an identifiable lesion, and through a neurological examination to rule out other possible causes of pain. A combination of both medication and therapy such as acupuncture will be suggested upon identification of neuropathic pain.

Neuropathic pain is caused by an abnormality in the day to day function of the peripheral or central nervous system. In most cases, this type of pain is ordinarily chronic in nature. Because our pets are unable to verbalize their discomfort, the pain of a neuropathic origin can be difficult to diagnose, thus making a visit to the veterinarian paramount to your dog’s health. Although your dog will not be able to explain to you of the severity of the pain, he deserves to be relieved of it.

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Symptoms of Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

It is known that neuropathic pain in dogs is a condition that may be difficult to recognize. As a pet owner, you know your dog best and must seek veterinary advice if you feel that your dog is suffering from pain:

  • One of the most obvious signs will be a change in your pet’s behavior
  • Change in mood and vitality
  • Low tolerance to activity, especially exercise - no matter how light
  • Licking an area constantly
  • Vocalization of pain
  • Possible lack of appetite
  • Change in urinary habits or bowel movements, including accidents in the house
  • Noticeable change in posture
  • Difficulty walking or standing up
  • Trouble with jumping or managing stairs

Perhaps less obvious to you are the following symptoms of neuropathic pain:

  • Your pet may exhibit a painful reaction to non-painful pressure such as touch (allodynia)
  • Your dog may feel a heightened sensitivity to pain (hyperalgesia)
  • Your dog may pull back from you when your are giving him attention due to extra sensitivity to touch and sensation (hyperpathia)

Causes of Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

Simply put, neuropathic pain occurs when the pain moves from the original source and the neural pathways become unusually sensitized. The pain then occurs with or without stimuli. Some causes for neuropathic pain are listed below:

  • Spinal tumor
  • Injury to the spinal cord
  • Injury to the peripheral nerves such as cauda equina syndrome (pressure and swelling of nerves)
  • Phantom pain resulting from a limb amputation
  • Intervertebral disk herniation
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Diabetes

Diagnosis of Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

When you bring your dog to the clinic, be prepared to discuss with the veterinarian a complete history of your dog’s past and present experiences. Because your pet is unable to speak for himself, you must be vigilant and as thorough as you can be when explaining the situation.

You may be asked the following questions:

  • How long has the pain been obvious to you?
  • Is the pain intermittent or continuous?
  • Do you notice any specific areas where the pain may be originating from?
  • Has your dog recently, or in the past, been ill or injured?
  • Does your pet vocalize pain when you least expect it?

The determination of the presence of neuropathic pain is often diagnosed by recognizing abnormal behavior. Together you and the veterinarian will observe your pet and use various stimuli to diagnose neuropathic pain:

  • Pain response to non-painful stimulation such as touch (allodynia)
  • Heightened sensitivity to pain (hyperalgesia)
  • Excessive sensitivity to touch, pressure, stimulation (hyperpathia)

Tools that may not cause a high degree of pain in a normal patient, but can cause extreme discomfort to a pet in a neuropathic state may be a pinprick, thermal heat or cold, stroking an area with gauze or cotton, and applying pressure.These assessments are crucial to diagnosing a case of neuropathic pain.

The veterinarian may decide to do blood tests or x-rays to look for lesions, infection, or to rule out other possible causes or symptoms of pain before confirming a diagnosis of neuropathic pain.

Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

If we compare the treatment of human neuropathic pain to the same sort of constant pain in our dogs, the common goal of treatment is to provide as much relief as possible. In humans, neuropathic pain is determined on these deciding factors:

  • There may be accompanying swelling
  • There can be pain but no tissue damage with it
  • A lack of some sensations may be evident
  • The pain can come in sudden jolts and spasms
  • allodynia, hyperalgesia, and hyperpathia are present
  • the pain burns, stabs and tingles

If you think about the factors mentioned above, one can imagine the difficulty in treating neuropathic pain. Studies show that the best forms of managing this type of pain is a combination of drugs and non-pharmacological therapy. Some of the options include:

  • Opioids
  • Anti-inflammatories
  • Local anaesthetics
  • Massage
  • Acupuncture
  • Anti-epileptics

As this field is under constant study, the veterinarian will discuss with you the options available. It should be noted that finding the right mix and balance of medication will take some time, and your cooperation and the documentation of improvements in your pet’s behavior will be invaluable information for the primary veterinary caregiver.

Recovery of Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

Follow up with the veterinarian on a daily to weekly basis will be required when the drugs are being tailored to the needs of your pet. Avoidance of adverse side effects is important. Because different dogs respond in various ways to pain, we must remember that neuropathic pain management is really an individual case by case scenario.

The behavior of your dog as he responds to the pain management treatment will be key to deciding if the protocol being followed is the best one for your pet. Daily observance of your dog is necessary, as is reporting all changes, whether positive or negative, to the veterinarian. You should be aware that neuropathic pain does not usually resolve, resulting in lifelong pain management.

Neuropathic Pain Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Susie
Beagle
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

not her self
Not very act
Vocalizing pain

My dog has been to the vet two time in two days because she seems to be in a lot of pain. They can't find anything wrong with her. They have done X-Rays on her abdomen because they thought she might have a blockage and no she did not. When she lays down she squeals when she gets back up sometimes for about 10 seconds. When she's sleeping and wakes up in the morning it's the worst she just seems like she is in so much pain. They gave her an antibiotic and pain medication but it only last for a little and then she seems to be in pain again. She's not pooping the normal amount only one time a day and it's a very small amount. She is peeing eating and drinking fine her normal amount. Sometimes she will play but most of he time she wants nothing to do with playing. Now she squeals if you go up to touch her sometimes or if you pull her leash to get her away from something.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
It is difficult to say what the specific cause of the pain would be; an intestinal obstruction, foreign body or even spinal issues would have shown up with x-rays. Further investigation may be needed but you may need to be referred to a Neurologist if there is no apparent cause for this pain. I would continue with the pain relief (if you have some) for now but visit a Neurologist to get to the bottom of this pain. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jasmine
Border Collie
15 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

SORENESS
Pain
Difficulty Rising

Our family border collie is having extreme difficulty standing and moving. We found a lump on her side (vet said it appears to be a fatty tumor). Due to her age she is taking a Glucosamine supplement daily. She is generally able to move and go the the restroom and even navigate the stairs once you assist her into the standing position. She was very a very athletic dog and is around 60 lbs but her demeanor has been changing and appears to be in more pain. The vet mentioned nerve damage but she has never been in a traumatic accident. Is this possibly severe arthritis. If it is nerve damage would a laser treatment help? What are your suggestions?

Thank you!

JASMINE's loving family.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
Nerve damage may occur for a variety of reasons and doesn’t necessarily mean that Jasmine was in a traumatic accident, smaller injuries like a fall or a slight knock may still cause some damage. Arthritis is another possibility especially at her age, a week’s course of antiinflammatories may help to see if there is any improvement in her condition; 60lb seems a little on the heavy side for a Border Collie and would suggest some weight loss plan to reduce the weight which she needs to carry. Treatments like laser therapy and acupuncture may be beneficial. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bella
Chihuahua poneranian mix
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weakness on all four limbs, incontinence

Hello Dr.,

My 5-yr old chihuahua/pomeranian began feeling weak, shaking, and having muscle spasms about 9 days ago. She has gotten progressively worse and as of 4 days ago, can no longer stand on her own as all four limbs have lost most motor function, and she became incontent yesterday. Per her vets recommendation, I tried crate rest and meloxicam as needed, but she still does not look too good. I took her to a vet neurologist yesterday and he said the source of weakness is coming from her head or neck, but i believe it's from the neck. I cannot afford mri or csf spinal tap procedures, so I would like to know what I should so at this point? I want to treat as probable intervertebral disk disease and give steroids to reduce inflammation, but I am not sure. PLEASE HELP!! I cannot watch my dog go through this.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
I would recommend taking an x-ray with contrast media (myelography - considerable cheaper than an MRI) as an intervertebral disk protrusion or compression would be easily seen as a bump on the spinal cord in relation to the contrast media. Medical management should be conservative if a diagnosis isn’t confirmed and your Veterinarian is right to start with meloxicam before moving on to other medications. I would do the myelography and a check of reflexes etc… and then decide on a course of action. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Dr. Turner,

Thank you so much for your prompt reply. Because Bella has been having more head seizures recently, she was prescribed Zonisamide 2x/daily for a week. I want to know if I can give a dose to her immediately after a seizure? Or should I give it 2x daily approx 12 hours apart, regardless of whether or not she is having an acute seizure episode? Thank you!

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Reese
Rottweiler
7
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Seperation Anxiety
Straining To Defecate
Licking genitals; panting; anxious
Eye Clouding
Yelping
Limping

Dr. Turner any advice would be greatly appreciated. Time is of the essence & we are at a loss to how we can help our dog, Reese. She is a 110 lb rottweiller in EXTREME pain. She was recently diagnosed with diabetes & her vet started her on novolin-n, 10 units, & then the following week up to 11 units. After doing vigorous research I am so sad to find out we should be more around 25... She can barely walk without yelping & whining, & struggles to get up, go outside, & use the restroom. The whole process of getting her to do each action is very time consuming & draining for everyone. She is such a good dog and tries her best to go outside if she needs to go (which she also struggles with). Our vets prescribed her arthritis medication to help, but it seems to be doing nothing. After finding out how off he is I am questioning the medication now. Please help us help her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

While the usual dosage of insulin (Novolin-n) is 0.5 units per kilogram (0.2-0.25 units per pound) which would give a dose of 25 units for a dog of 110lb; the only reason I can imagine why your Veterinarian started at a lower dose is that the blood glucose wasn’t extremely high and Reece wasn’t eating much food for a dog her size, your Veterinarian may have been concerned about the blood glucose level going too low (hypoglycemia). A blood glucose curve would be useful to determine the severity of the diabetes and to assist in adjusting dosage for Reece. The weakness and lethargy would be exasperated by diabetes, especially if Reece is already suffering from musculoskeletal pain. Because I haven’t examined Reece or seen any test results, I cannot prescribe any medication; however, I would recommend discussing the insulin dosage (and suggestion of glucose blood curve) with your Veterinarian and to possibly use a different form of pain management. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Reese's glucose levels were through the roof, 653. I am willing to email you all the test results we have for her if you are interested. Thank you for the quick response!

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dollar
Boxer
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

limping front leg

Medication Used

gabapetin 300mg and propalin liquid

my dog a boxer 10 years old has had 3 general anesthetics in the past 4 months the first to drain and close an abscess on her vulva the second to remove a mass from the rear leg ,following this she started not using her front leg on the same side and was dragging it, so we then had a 3rd to xray of the shoulder elbow and wrist no arthritis was found and advised we try some anti epilepsy drugs this just made her unable to engage with her surroundings so were stopped do you think we could get results from a combination of acupuncture and activate drug.she is eating fine although we are having bladder leakage and she is still alert but is sleeping more.she doesnt seem in pain and will let you move the limb freely.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Causes for the lack of use of the front leg may be due to nerve damage, nerve degeneration or trauma (not visible on x-ray). When a cause isn’t defined, it is difficult to prescribe a course of treatment because you are looking at treating symptoms rather than the actual cause. There have been numerous reports of improvement after the use of acupuncture; however, if you are considering using acupuncture, remember that it may or may not be effective and to approach with caution. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Full Recovery
Treatment Cost: $7,000.00
Mri scan revealed a muscle tear to the shoulder using a combination of hydrotherapy and physio

Dr. Turner any advice would be greatly appreciated. Time is of the essence & we are at a loss to how we can help our dog, Reese. She is a 110 lb rottweiller in EXTREME pain. She was recently diagnosed with diabetes & her vet started her on novolin-n, 10 units, & then the following week up to 11 units. After doing vigorous research I am so sad to find out we should be more around 25... She can barely walk without yelping & whining, & struggles to get up, go outside, & use the restroom. The whole process of getting her to do each action is very time consuming & draining for everyone. She is such a good dog and tries her best to go outside if she needs to go (which she also struggles with). Our vets prescribed her arthritis medication to help, but it seems to be doing nothing. After finding out how off he is I am questioning the medication now. Please help us help her.

Our boxer did this after I gave him heartworm medication. Thought he would die. He screamed in pan, could not walk, could not get up and down. Thought he would die. All within 8 hours of the heartworm medication.

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Bella
American English Coonhound
Approx. 4 months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Hi, my name is Valentina and I have a 4 month old puppy named Bella.She looks like an American English Coonhound. I recently adopted her from a shelter in Colombia and is currently there until we can arrange for her to come to Canada soon. She is staying with family there, and for the last 3 days she has been in a lot of pain and is limping. The affected leg is the back right leg, and sometimes she limps and sometimes she doesn't and acts normal without any pain. She's been treated for kennel cough recently and seems to have completely or almost completely recovered. They took her to the vet and the vet just said that it seems it is neurological and is because of the kennel cough, but I'm skeptical. What would you avise to do? They are going to take her to a different vet, so what tests would the vet have to do to determine the problem? And what are the possible treatments? She seems to be in a lot of pain, and will cry out a lot at times, but at times will be completely fine. Because I'm not there I can't provide a lot of information, but I'm really worried.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

From your description, the cause of the limping could be from a few different causes, these include intervertebral disc disease, trauma, neurological disease, nerve inflammation, congenital disease (hip dysplasia – a common problem in Coonhounds) etc… I would recommend taking x-rays, one her back of the lumbar, sacral vertebrae, pelvis and femur; and one on her side of the same region would show any anatomical abnormalities that may indicate the cause of this pain. Usually intermittent pain in the limbs is caused by some dislocation, sub-luxation, ligament damage or muscle cramp leading to the pinching of a nerve leading to pain. X-ray’s would be advantageous in helping to make a first step to find a cause of the problem. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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PeeWee
10
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

My dog had an injury about 6 years ago with his hip from jumping off a bed. He is 10 years old and a pug boston terrier mix. It seems like his leg is dragging a little when he first starts to walk and having a hard time getting up stairs. He is contained while i am at work for 8 hours a day and when i come home and let him out he can't make it outside in time to have a bowel movement and poops as he is walking. This is only happened in the last month about 3 times. I am recently divorced and no way can I afford a pain management system. I just want to know if my dog is in pain and should I have him put down? He is my baby, and I don't want him to suffer IF he is in pain. He is eating fine and still wants to play.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

This is a delicate matter and without examining PeeWee I am unable to say if he is in pain or not. I understand that finances are tight, but it would be worth getting PeeWee an examination at your local Veterinarian which will include the usual heart, lung etc… checks, but would also include a basic neurological examination (and checking pain responses) and possibly x-rays to determine the actual cause and extent of the hip and hind leg problems. In cases like these you have to weigh up pain, discomfort and more importantly his quality of life; this I cannot say without personally examining him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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