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What are Tooth Root Abscess?

Pet owners who may overlook proper care for their dogs' teeth could up the risks of pus developing in the cavity of their teeth. Purulent exudate (pus) near the gum line and excess tartar could lead to discomfort, extreme pain, bacteria spreading to vital organs and organ failure. The buildup of tartar, without cleaning teeth, can become so bad that the teeth may fall out when it is finally removed.

Apical abscess, or pus formations under or around the canine teeth, occur for a variety of reasons. Regardless of the reason, all abscesses are correlated to extreme pain. Do not take a wait and see approach as the bacteria can and will spread quickly causing serious medical conditions.

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Tooth Root Abscess Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$1,200

Symptoms of Tooth Root Abscess in Dogs

Because dogs are usually a feisty bunch who bite, chew and grab at a variety of things, pet owners may easily dismiss a chipped tooth or bad breath as a dog being a dog. Don't. Some common symptoms of periodontal disease in relation to dogs include:

  • Drooling
  • Fractured tooth
  • Gingivitis (bleeding gums)
  • Loss of appetite
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Inability to chew

Oral diseases can also occur if the dog does not lose its deciduous (puppy teeth) in exchange for its permanent teeth (28 teeth versus 42 teeth). While these teeth can be extracted, a veterinarian should be consulted to confirm whether this issue is due to genetics, trauma or something even as serious as a tumor.

Types

Other common types of periodontal disease that are commonly linked to visible pus buildup near a dog's mouth include:

  • Early Gingivitis (mild plaque buildup on teeth, mild redness around the gums)
  • Advanced Gingivitis (plaque below the gumline, higher amount of redness, and fluid in connective tissue aka edema)
  • Early Periodontitis (calculus below the gum line, along with bleeding gums, edema, gum recession or hyperplasia)
  • Established Periodontitis (higher amount of calculus below the gum line, along with bleeding gums, inflammation, gum recession, loose and/or missing teeth)
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Causes of Tooth Root Abscess in Dogs

A dog's body will produce extra white blood cells as a blockade to the rest of the body after an infection occurs in the mouth. That enclosed area, known as an abscess, can be the result of:

  • Bacterial skin infections
  • Dog bites
  • Splinters (primarily from wood)
  • Wounds

Although other illnesses are a possibility for the pus-related illness in a dog's teeth, more often than not, the pet owner will find that keeping dogs from chewing foreign objects and keeping a dog's teeth clean are much easier ways to prevent tooth-related incidents.

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Diagnosis of Tooth Root Abscess in Dogs

Bad-smelling discharge on teeth or a hard texture on top of teeth are telltale signs of oral disease that may lead to pus in the cavity of teeth. While there are options for pet owners to take from home to avoid the issue before it starts, seeing a veterinarian to find out the severity of the issue is highly recommended. The veterinarian will complete a pre-anesthetic blood testing exam to assess the dog's dental health.

Antibiotics (Antirobe, Cefa-Drops, Cefa-Tabs, Clavamox) may be suggested before the diagnosis, and anesthesia and monitoring during the dental exam will be suggested. The exam will entail the veterinarian checking to see if the pocket depth is healthy (two to three millimeters) by using a calibrated probe.

During the exam, the veterinarian will determine what Grade level the periodontal disease is.

  • Early Gingivitis (Grade 1)
  • Advanced Gingivitis (Grade 2)
  • Early Periodontitis (Grade 3)
  • Established Periodontitis (Grade 4)
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Treatment of Tooth Root Abscess in Dogs

For a pet owner who is confident in dental care for dogs, there are diagnosis steps to take from home to avoid abscess from forming. A few suggestions are:

  • Applying a compress to the wounded area to prevent more white blood cells from forming along the infected area
  • Brushing the dog's teeth with a child's toothbrush or a pet toothbrush (While not suggested for a novice, a finger toothbrush using gauze and a cotton swab are additional options if the dog does not react well to a real toothbrush)
  • Getting rid of all dangerous or even potential items the dog may chew on, specifically with wood that may cause splinters
  • Stopping the dog from irritating the area by biting down on other objects or scratching the irritated area with its paws
  • Using salt water or antibacterial cream to keep the dog's mouth clean

Once the pus buildup has reached the point where a veterinarian must get involved, your dog will need a complete dental cleaning and polishing, and removal of tartar buildup on the teeth and gum lines by using handheld and ultrasonic scalers. Root planing, subgingival curettage, and tooth extraction may be possibilities for the worst case scenarios.

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Recovery of Tooth Root Abscess in Dogs

Along with the veterinarian providing tips for the proper way to brush the dog's teeth, four to six-week checkups at minimum two to four times a year are helpful to keep tabs on the dog's tooth pockets.

Pet owners should avoid using toothpaste designed for humans because the cleaning ingredients in them may lead to vomiting and stomach upsets in dogs. Pet owners should query what would be the best veterinary pastes that would make brushing a dog's teeth less of a challenge.

There may be a learning curve similar to dog food about what the dog will actually like best, but either way, dog brushing should be done daily. Dangerous chew toys or wooden objects that can lead to splinters, infections, and tooth damage should be removed from the play area immediately.

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Tooth Root Abscess Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$1,200

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Tooth Root Abscess Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Cody

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Chihuahua

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11 Years

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Serious severity

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2 found helpful

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

High Temperature

My 11 yr old chihuahua had an infected tooth removed he was on antibiotics prior to removal as he had a open sore in his face and then had the tooth removed. Since coming home he has quickly deteriorated.he breathing was rapid he seemed in pain didn’t move around much would stay where u put him. I took him back they said he has an infection , high temp and low sugar. The next day they called to say he won’t stand and can not lift his head and may have a slip disk and are doing a scan today ! Could this be a result of the tooth removal.

Aug. 20, 2018

Cody's Owner

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2 Recommendations

A slipped disc is unlikely to be related to the dental work, however any dental work may result in pain or discomfort which would explain the rapid breathing. See what comes back the the scan to see if there is a slipped disc or another cause for the inability to stand. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 20, 2018

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dog-name-icon

Jackie

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Cocker Spaniel

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7 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Smelly Mouth
Blood
Puss
Eye Redness
Drooling
Ear Odor

I have a 7 year old cocker spaniel who has been having puss and blood come from her left ear and eye irritation. I think those things are happening because she needs a teeth cleaning. I think this because she is also drooling on the side that the ear and eye are having issues. Will a cleaning help her with these problems? She is still eating and hasn't lost weight. Please help me. She is scheduled for a cleaning but I just want to know it that will help her.

July 21, 2018

Jackie's Owner

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recommendation-ribbon

1 Recommendations

Most likely a cleaning alone isn’t going to help, it is possible that Jackie will require some tooth extractions, flushing of an abscess cavity, antibiotic among other treatments; without examining her I cannot say for certain but your Veterinarian will examine her when she arrives at the clinic and will indicate what they believe will need to be done (but that may change based on what is found during the cleaning). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 21, 2018

Was this experience helpful?

Tooth Root Abscess Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$1,200

Vet bills can sneak up on you.

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