Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning Average Cost

From 455 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,200

Average Cost

$700

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What is Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning?

Dracaena deremensis, more commonly known as Warneckii Dracaena or the Janet Craig plant, is an evergreen plant with lance-shaped leaves that are approximately two feet in length. It is popular as a houseplant due to the attractively striped leaves, and it’s hardiness. Saponins that are found throughout the plant can cause gastrointestinal distress and loss of coordination in your pet, though it is not generally considered to be lethal.

Dracaena deremensis, more commonly known as Warneckii Dracaena or the Janet Craig plant, is an evergreen plant with lance-shaped leaves that are approximately two feet in length. It is popular as a houseplant due to the attractively striped leaves, and it’s hardiness. Saponins that are found throughout the plant can cause gastrointestinal distress and loss of coordination in your pet, though it is not generally considered to be lethal.

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Symptoms of Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning in Dogs

Symptoms of poisoning from the Warneckii dracaena plant tend to be mild unless large quantities of the plant are consumed. These symptoms are similar to the symptoms from other toxins as well, so if you are uncertain of the origin of the toxin, contact your veterinarian right away.

  • Abdominal pain
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive drooling
  • Increased heart rate
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Loss of coordination
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness

Types

Even plants with low toxicity can be a source of additional hazards. Although the risk factor for these situations is low, close observation of your pet is the best way to ensure prompt medical treatment for unexpected happenings. 

Intestinal blockages

  • The digestive system of dogs is not designed to handle large quantities of vegetation
  • Although most dogs do not tend to do more than sample garden plants, some dogs may develop pica or an overwhelming craving for non-food items
  • This can cause the consumption of large amounts of inappropriate materials, such as plants, which can lead to intestinal blockages     

Pesticides

  • Even non-toxic plants may be treated with decidedly toxic pesticides
  • If the garden your pet has sampled from is not your own and symptoms of poisoning occur you should contact your veterinarian immediately
  • Canines poisoned by pesticides will exhibit signs such as vomiting, tremors, seizures, and breathing difficulties.

Causes of Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning in Dogs

Plants in the Dracaena family contain various toxic saponins in all parts of the plant. These saponins are non-toxic to humans but mildly to moderately noxious for both dogs and cats. If you catch your pet grazing on these plants you should contact your veterinarian for further instructions.

Diagnosis of Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning in Dogs

Identification combined with symptomatology is often all that is required for a preliminary diagnosis if the consumption of the plant was witnessed. If you didn’t observe the ingestion of the plant, your veterinarian will take note of any opportunistic eating that is suspected in addition to any concurrent prescriptions or supplements that your dog is taking in an attempt to reveal which toxin is responsible for the signs that are showing. A biochemistry profile will also be used to this end, as will a complete blood count and urinalysis with particular attention being paid to results regarding liver and kidney functionality. Any plant material found in the vomit will help confirm the diagnosis. If an intestinal blockage is the cause of the distress, rather than the toxin itself, the examiner may find a mass where the vegetation has clumped together or discover that the abdomen is extremely sensitive to touch, prompting a recommendation for further imaging. Ultrasound, x-ray or even a barium study may be selected to accurately visualize the possible obstruction.

Treatment of Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning in Dogs

Treatment will be guided by the symptoms that your pet is showing and the length of time since the ingestion of the plant. If your dog is in distress when you call or visit the office, supportive treatment such as treatment with IV fluids may be offered and begun before a diagnosis is determined. In some cases, gastric decontamination becomes necessary to remove as much of the toxin from the system as possible. These steps could include inducing vomiting, gastric lavage, and the use of activated charcoal.  In the event that your pet is vomiting excessively, a period of withholding food may be recommended until the vomiting has ceased for at least 12 hours. In the case of an intestinal blockage, in most cases, therapies such as fluid therapy can be used to speed the mass through the system. Imaging will be repeated periodically in order to track the movement of the mass until it exits the gastrointestinal system. In severe cases, surgery will be required to remove the mass and correct any damage that it has caused.

Recovery of Warneckii Dracaena Poisoning in Dogs

Prognosis for poisoning caused by eating the Warneckii Dracaena plant is usually good. Even when the toxin does not instigate a reaction from your pet, eating too much vegetation can cause gastrointestinal distress or blockage. A pet who suddenly develops the urge to eat large amounts of vegetation or other inappropriate items may be responding to brain lesions, vitamin deficiencies, or circulatory abnormalities and should be checked by a veterinarian. The best way to keep your pet safe is by careful observation of their behavior and environment.