Water Diabetes in Dogs

Water Diabetes in Dogs - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost
Water Diabetes in Dogs - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

What are Water Diabetes?

Diabetes Insipidus, also called Water Diabetes, is a disease affecting dogs, cats, rats, and occasionally other animals. In this disease, a hormone called ADH is either not secreted in sufficient amounts by the brain, or is not properly recognized by specific cells in the kidneys. This results in extreme thirst and frequent evacuation of very diluted urine. Essentially, the animal’s body is trying to rid itself of more water than is needed for normal urination. This condition is not usually life-threatening, but is inconvenient for the owner and stressful for the animal. However, primary kidney disease, a much more serious condition, may display these same symptoms, and so extreme thirst paired with frequent, lengthy urination is cause for a visit to the veterinarian. Diabetes Insipidus is a disease of the urinary system, where either insufficient amount of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is secreted by the hypothalamus, or target cells in the kidneys have lost the ability to respond to normal levels of ADH. This lack of communication between the brain and the kidneys results in polyuria with hypotonic urine and extreme thirst.

Water Diabetes Average Cost

From 17 quotes ranging from $500 - $5,000

Average Cost

$1,800

Symptoms of Water Diabetes in Dogs

  • Increased intake of water
  • Frequent urination of almost clear liquid
  • Whining at empty water dish
  • Appearing agitated even after a walk
Types
  • Central (brain-based)
  • Nephrogenic (kidney-based)
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Causes of Water Diabetes in Dogs

  • Failure of target cells in kidneys to respond to ADH
  • Traumatic head injury causing hemorrhage in the hypothalamus or pars nervosa.
  • Neoplasm (tumor) causing lesions in, or damage to, the hypothalamus and pars nervosa
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Diagnosis of Water Diabetes in Dogs

Owners noting frequent urination above what is normal for their pet should monitor the amount of water the animal consumes and the color of their urine. If this pattern of drinking and urination persists, make an appointment with your veterinarian, as the much more serious primary kidney disease could be occurring.

The veterinarian will first rule out primary kidney disease, and then evaluate your pet’s ability to concentrate urine with a water deprivation test. This is done by waiting for the pet to empty their bladder, then withholding food and water for 3-8 hours, which often stimulates ADH to be produced. The animal should be carefully monitored for dehydration, and the test ended if greater than 5% of the animal’s body weight is lost through urine excretion. If the pet is unable to concentrate urine, then an ADH response test may be carried out to better identify the cause of the excessive urination. This is a simple test that involves administering small amounts of a synthetic ADH-replacement, and measuring the specific gravity of the urine (a way of assessing concentration) over a period of 24 hours.

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Treatment of Water Diabetes in Dogs

Diabetes insipidus may be controlled by the administration of desmopressin acetate, which mimics the function of ADH. This medication comes in the form of eyedrops or nasal spray, and can be administered at home by the owner. A gradual increase of the dose will be needed to determine the minimum effective amount, but when this amount is found, water may be freely given and no restrictions are needed.

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Worried about the cost of Water Diabetes treatment?

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Recovery of Water Diabetes in Dogs

While Diabetes Insipidus is a lifelong condition, it can easily be managed by administration of the eyedrops or nose drops 1-2 times daily, which will control the symptoms and allow your pet a normal, healthy life. There is no need to restrict water once the correct dosage is found.

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Water Diabetes Average Cost

From 17 quotes ranging from $500 - $5,000

Average Cost

$1,800

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Water Diabetes Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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SUGAR

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Pittbull mix

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8 Years

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1 found helpful

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1 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Peeing In House

MY DOG IS A 8 YR OLD PITTBULL NAMED SUGAR SHE HAS BEEN HAVING ACCIDENTS.IN THE HOUSE OUT OF NO WHERE. WHEN I WAS WALKING HER SHE STOPS AND PEES ALOT MORE THAN USUAL AND EVEN CONTINUES TO PEE AS SHE WALKS.

July 26, 2017

SUGAR's Owner

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1 Recommendations

Accidents in the house and an increase in urination may be caused by a few different causes including diabetes, Cushing’s Disease, other hormonal conditions, pyometra (if not spayed), urinary tract infections, kidney failure and other causes; the first step would be to visit your Veterinarian for a urine test and a physical examination, a blood test would also be useful too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 26, 2017

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Zane

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Pittbull mix

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11 Years

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0 found helpful

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0 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Skin Crust
Loss Muscle Mass
Weight Loss
Hairloss
Increased Urination
Increase Water Intake

My pit bull is 11 years old. He is neutered and was always pretty healthy. A while ago, we noticed he had blood in his urine, but two vets could not give definite diagnosis. The best we got was that he felt it was a kidney stone. Lately, I noticed that his water intake and urine output has increased considerably. He also has been losing muscle mass, losing weight, and his skin has been scaly with some hair loss. I got testing strips and it showed that his glucose was negative but ketones are trace. Am I dealing with diabetes? Water diabetes?

July 26, 2017

Zane's Owner

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0 Recommendations

Ketonuria (ketones in the urine) may be present in the urine for a number of reasons, diabetes being one of them; user error, concentrated urine, reduced food intake, low carbohydrate diet, medicine side effects, other hormonal conditions and many more. This would be something to visit your Veterinarian for; a single urinary test strip is insufficient and only helps direct a diagnosis, blood tests and a physical examination would be the next step. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 26, 2017

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Water Diabetes Average Cost

From 17 quotes ranging from $500 - $5,000

Average Cost

$1,800

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