Introduction

One of the most pawpular and recognizable breeds in the US, German Shepherds are often employed as police and service dogs, but their high intelligence and trainability also make them woofderful family pets. They're very active and athletic as well, so get ready to get off your butt if you've decided to add a German Shepherd puppy to your family! Raising a German Shepherd pup is not always a walk in the park, but preparing for your furry friend's arrival should make the adjustment period smoother for everyone involved. Once you've earned your new pup's trust, you'll have a loyal companion who'll stay by your side no matter what! 

Home Preparation

Make sure you've puppy-proofed your home before the big day! German Shepherds are curious canines who will put their nose in everything, so remove items that you wouldn't want them to get a hold of, such as power cords and medication. Baby gates are also great for keeping your pup confined to a particular area when you can't watch them. Have a bed or crate ready for your German Shepherd, too, so they'll have a little corner to call their own. When it comes to food, an age-appropriate, high-quality dog food should provide all the nutrients your growing puppy needs. Later on, your German Shepherd will shed their fuzzy puppy fur and grow a double coat, so get a slicker brush to keep it in tiptop condition.

Create a Schedule

German Shepherd puppies need to consume more food than adults, with young pups eating three to four small meals per day. Your pup will stuff their face if you let them, so you'll have to regulate the amount for them; talk to your vet about how much food your pooch should be getting. Make sure your pup maintains a healthy weight by taking them on daily walks and having regular play sessions with them. You'll also need to take them outside to go to the bathroom after eating, drinking, playing, and waking up. It's recommended that you enroll your German Shepherd in puppy training classes so that they grow into a well-behaved adult. Your pup should have completed their first vet visit by the time they're six to eight weeks old.

What to Expect the First Week

The German Shepherd is a fast growing breed, so don't be surprised if your pup gains 10 pounds each month, which is normal. Your new best friend will be teething not only during the first week, but also for the next few months, so provide them with chew toys to minimize damage to your shoes, furniture, and other possessions. Fiercely loyal, German Shepherds are happiest when they live with their family. Include your pup in your household's activities, and you'll have formed a strong bond that will last a lifetime!
Sleep
Sleep

Often

Your German Shepherd pup can sleep up to 18 hours per day.
Toys
Toys

Fetch, Tug

Durable toys that get German Shepherds to use up their high energy are pawfect.
Training
Training

Easy

German Shepherds are very smart, so training shouldn't be a problem.
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book a Walk
*Valid only for first time customers
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers