Introduction

The term ‘rescue dog’ is often used to describe any dog that comes from a shelter, but actually refers to a doggo that comes from an animal rescue. Generally speaking, an animal rescue is a private organization that takes in abused, neglected, or homeless pups, then fosters them before placing them in a furever home. Bringing home a rescue dog can be an incredibly rewarding experience. You get to provide a safe loving home to a furry friend that has seen their fair share of ups and downs. Keep reading to find out what you can expect when adopting a rescue dog.

Foster Homes

Most rescue organizations keep their dogs in foster homes rather than at an actual shelter. Foster dog parents get to know their pups and come to love them as their own. This is a huge benefit for a couple reasons. First, foster parents are familiar with the doggo’s personality, behavior, and health. They can give you accurate infurmation about the pup, so surprises are kept to a minimum. Conversely, shelters may not know a lot about a dog’s background. Rescue dogs living in foster homes get to socialize with people and sometimes other animals. Rather than spending their days in a pen at a stressful shelter, these pups get to be part of the family. Foster parents help prepare the dogs for adoption and give them the love and affection they need while waiting for their furever homes. This can help cut down the time your new pal will need to adjust to your home.

Adoption Process

Rescue organizations want to be sure dogs are adopted into a loving family that will give them a pawsome furever home. Since they don't deal with the large volumes of animals like shelters, rescue organizations are able to take their time with each adoption. Don’t be surprised if you are asked to complete a series of interviews and a set of paperwork. You may even have a home visit from a staff member of the rescue organization. For the most part, animal rescues run off donations, so expect to encounter some adoption fees. While the lengthy process may seem like a hassle, it’s all for a good cause. The organization wants to make sure you and the rescue pup are a match made in heaven. Have patience and don’t let it deter you. Before you know it, your new four legged family member will part of your family.

Behavior

A lot of rescue dogs have spent some time at the school of hard knocks. Life probably wasn’t always kind to them, and they could have been abused, neglected, or homeless. The good news is now they are safe in your arms and ready to heal. It’s impawtant to know that rescue dogs can come with some heavy baggage. Try to get as much infurmation about their history from the rescue organization as you can. If your doggo is afraid of people, use treats or toys to draw them closer. Hand feeding is another pawsome way that you can bond with your new pooch. Make sure your pup has their own place where they can feel safe. Designate a spot for their crate or dog bed. When they retreat to their space, leave them alone and let them decompress. Remember to always remain calm and be extra patient. It may take time, but eventually your pooch will feel safe, and be able to bond with you, making a furbulous furever friend for life.
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A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers