Introduction

Happy Birthday to your pup! Your beloved fur ball has reached the ripe old age of one and deserves a pawty! Together, you have weathered the months of puppyhood and adolescence. Although you are more than ready for your puppy to reach the maturity of an adult, they are not quite there. They are still a bit silly and may “forget” the rules. And they have what seems like limitless energy. Now, more than ever, it’s impawtant for you to maintain your schedule of training, socialization, and daily exercise. Read on for more pawsome information about this stage of your pup's life. 

Growth and Development

By their first birthday, dogs are pretty close to their full size. At this point, smaller breeds are most likely finished growing, while larger breeds will get slightly bigger over the next few months. Either way, you should have a good idea of how large (or small) your dog will end up. You may have noticed that your house is covered in dog fur. Well, your pal has shed their puppy coat and their adult coat has taken its place. From here on out, expect regular shedding, unless you have a hypoallergenic breed. To help keep the dog fur to a minimum, schedule a weekly brush session with your pup. Your doggo reached sexually maturity prior to turning one, and in addition to having higher levels of hormones, they can reproduce. If they haven’t been spayed or neutered, plan a visit to the vet. The timing is pawfect since your pup is ready for their one year check up!

Health

During puppyhood, your furry friend experienced the vet when they received their vaccinations. Unfurtunately for your pup, vet visits aren't going away. The bad news is they still need to have regular visits. The good news is that unless they get injured or sick, they only need to go once a year. Schedule their first “big kid” appointment around their first birthday. Be sure to talk to your veterinarian about heartworm prevention, flea and tick medications. They also need a rabies vaccine. Depending on your pup’s size, they may be ready to transition to adult dog food. Puppy food is calorie rich and full of nutrients for developing pups. So as long as your furry friend is growing, it’s best to give them puppy food. This means that small breeds can make the switch at 12 months, while larger breeds should wait a little longer. Mix the adult food into their current kibble, gradually increasing the amount day by day.

Behavior and Training

While they are young and impressionable, pups need a healthy dose of socialization. Ideally, this begins when they are four months old. However, continuing to socialize them throughout their younger years encourages your pup to play well others. Plenty of visits to dog parks, human parks, dog friendly stores, and even walking around town will sharpen their social skills right up. While you’re out, let them stop to meet new dogs and people. The more time your pup spends socializing, the better prepared they will be for changes throughout their lives.
Training
Training

Obedience Class

If you haven't already, sign up for an obedience class.
Toys
Toys

A Variety of Toys

Your pup is still learning and curious, so give them many choices for toys.
Sleep
Sleep

Still A Lot

At this age your puppy sleeps 14-18 hours a day.
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book a Walk
*Valid only for first time customers
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers