Introduction

Very few things in life are as exciting as adopting a new puppy. Their chubby tummy, clumsy legs, and tiny yelps are enough to melt anyone’s heart. But don’t be fooled by those big brown eyes, as raising a puppy isn’t all hugs and cuddles. A pup’s formative months are quite labor intensive for any pet parent. But if you do your job right and persevere through the chewing, potty training, and endless energy, you’ll have a happy and healthy puppy that unconditionally loves you, even on your grumpiest of days. Read on to find out what you can expect when adopting a puppy.

Training

Over the next few months, your puppy will be inundated with training. One of the first things they need to learn is where they can relieve themselves. Potty training can seem overwhelming for both pup and parent, but with consistent effort and pawsitive reinforcement, your puppy should catch on in no time. There are several different methods like using a crate, puppy pads, or a bell. Do your research and determine which way best suits your situation. Crate training is also something you want to start with right away. Not only does crate training up your potty training game, it also gives your pup a place of refuge. Plus, sometimes rambunctious puppies need a place to cool off and reset. As the weeks go by, your little furball also needs to be leash trained and learn basic commands like ‘sit’ and ‘stay.’ Start looking into obedience classes, so once they have all their vaccinations they’ll be ready to start puppy kindergarten.

Health

When it comes to your pup’s health, vaccinations are top priority at this stage. Your little one will get a series of shots over the next few months that will keep them healthy and immune from terrible diseases like Canine Distemper, Parvovirus, and Bordetella Bronchiseptica. The first set is administered around six to eight weeks. Puppies typically stay with their dog mamas until eight weeks. By the time you adopt your new fur baby, they should have had their first round of vaccines. After that, you need to return to the vet at 10-12 weeks, then again at 14-16 weeks for more shots. If you follow the schedule, your pooch will be fully vaccinated around four months. During this time, be sure to ask your vet about heartworm prevention. Oral medication, topical ointments, and injections are all available. Doggos actually need lifelong heartworm prevention, so it’s good to get in the habit at an early age.

Exercise

If you haven’t noticed already, your puppy has two speeds: 100 miles per hour and fast asleep. Daily exercise and play sessions will help burn off some of your pal’s steam, but be careful not to overdo it. Too much exercise can damage your growing pup’s joints. While they are young, use the ratio of five minutes of exercise per month of age. Little pups can go for a 20 minute walk around the neighborhood. Of course, this doesn’t include playtime. Chewing on toys or wrestling around the house is perfectly acceptable. It stimulates their minds and gives you a chance to bond with them. Of course, as your pup grows, they will need more exercise, especially if they are a high energy breed. But just because their body is bigger doesn’t mean they can go for miles. As you increase their exercise time, take plenty of breaks and pay attention to their body language. Soon, your pup will grow into a healthy adult companion!
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book a Walk
*Valid only for first time customers
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers