Introduction

When you hear the word dog, it’s easy to think of a tail wagging, happy-go-lucky pup that wants to lick your face. But in reality, not all dogs are friendly, and many are not eager to meet new people or other dogs. There are a variety of reasons why dogs are shy. It can be their personality, or maybe they weren’t properly socialized at an early age. Some dogs are shy because of a past trauma or chronic pain. Even though they require a little extra TLC, shy dogs are just as loveable and will melt your heart. Read on for more pawsome infurmation about adopting a shy dog.  

Socialization

Just because your pup is shy doesn’t mean they need to be isolated. Socialization with other dogs and people can happen; it just needs to be modified. Avoid busy parks, neighborhoods, or other chaotic environments. Don’t be afraid to let someone know that your pooch doesn’t want to be pet. Instead let your pal inch their way over to greet the new friend. To help this process, the person can offer your fur baby a treat. When meeting another dog, the regular nose to tail method may be rather intimidating for your shy pooch. Instead, have the two dogs walk side by side and get used to each other before stopping to sniff. You can also use a doggy mentor to assist in socialization. If you know a calm patient dog, let your pal spend time with them. This canine friend may help your pup feel relaxed enough to come out of their shell.

Confidence

Exercise and training are two furrific ways to help your timid pup gain confidence. If your pal doesn’t already know basic commands like ‘sit,’ ‘stay,’ and ‘come,’ use pawsitive reinforcement to teach them. This helps them know you are the pack leader and they can look to you for direction, especially when they are unsure of what to do. Use the command ‘watch me,’ and train them to sit and look at you before play time, going through doors, or getting treats. In the future, when your pup is stressed out, you can use this command to direct their attention to you. It’s been said that a ‘tired dog is a good dog.’ Well, a tired dog is also less likely to worry and be timid. A daily walk or a play session helps relax your pup and stimulates their mind. If they are fit, try agility training. It combines training and exercise, which is a double win.

Respect

One of the best things you can do for your shy doggo is to acknowledge that they are who they are. If you have tried introducing them to new places, situations, and people, and they are still as timid as ever, realize that your pooch just isn’t a social butterfly. Forcing them into uncomfortable circumstances or making them interact with other dogs or people can result in fear and your dog may turn to biting. If they hide in the back bedroom when company arrives, don’t drag them out to make introductions. Avoid chaotic destinations like a bustling muttropolis or a firework display. Make sure they have a safe space like a crate, and let your pal live life at their own pace. Of course, continue to build their confidence and work on socialization. Shy dogs can be a little extra work, but one look at those big brown eyes and you’ll know it’s totally worth it!
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A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers