Introduction

After 14 years, your doggo is practically your other half. In fact, they probably know you better than you know yourself! Their days of jumping and running may be over, but they still have plenty of love to give and belly rubs to enjoy. At this point in their life, comfort is priority. Work closely with your vet to manage any pain your pal may be experiencing. Give them a cozy place to rest and make sure they are getting daily exercise, no matter how slow it may be. Read on for some helpful infurmation on your 14 year old pooch. 

Growth and Development

As your pooch ages, their glands can stop working correctly. As a result, your beloved pup may have an abundance of certain hormones or not enough of others. For example, doggos with hypothyroidism don’t get enough thyroid hormones in their system. When this happens, they can lose their fur, shed excessively, gain weight, or become lethargic. A simple blood test can determine if your pal has an underactive thyroid, and medication can get their hormone levels right back to where they belong. On the other paw, older dogs can develop Cushing’s Disease, or the overproduction of glucocorticoid hormones. This occurs when the pituitary or adrenal gland don’t function properly. Symptoms can vary greatly and are often chalked up to ‘old age.’ Watch for frequent urination, increased appetite, and hair loss. Keep a close relationship with your vet so they can help identify anything out of the ordinary.

Health

Older dogs can develop many kinds of health issues, and even the canine species can’t hide from heart disease. While doggy heart attacks do happen, they are rare. Your dog is more likely to develop Mitral Valve Disease, or MVD. Just like the rest of their body, your dog’s heart changes as they get older. Their heart muscles and valves lose elasticity and get thicker. When this happens, their heart contractions aren’t as strong and blood leaks backward, enlarging the chambers. If untreated, MVD can lead to congestive heart failure. Early detection is key. A heart murmur, or irregular heartbeat, is the first symptom. If your doggo is having regular vet visits, a murmur is more likely to be detected. But if you notice that your pal tires faster than usual, coughs excessively, or breathes rapidly, take them to the vet. If caught early, MVD can be managed with medication.

Training

It’s no secret that senior dogs love their naps. While it’s always good to let a sleeping dog lie, excessive napping may disrupt their night time sleep cycle. A blind or deaf dog can also get thrown from their nightly routine. If this happens, increase your dog’s exercise during the day so they can drift off to dreamland when the sun goes down. Puzzles, soft toys, and games also help keep them awake.
Toys
Toys

Inspect Toys

Remember to check your dog's toys for broken pieces and sharp edges.
Food
Food

Senior Kibble

Feed your pooch a quality food designed for senior dogs.
Sleep
Sleep

18+ Hours a Day

Sleep is an increasing part of a senior dog's life.
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
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A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers