Painful Abdomen in Cats

Painful Abdomen in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

Most common symptoms

Diarrhea / Pain / Poor Appetite / Straining To Urinate / Vomiting / Weight Loss

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Rated as moderate conditon

45 Veterinary Answers

Most common symptoms

Diarrhea / Pain / Poor Appetite / Straining To Urinate / Vomiting / Weight Loss

Painful Abdomen in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

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What is Painful Abdomen?

Pain located in the abdomen can result from conditions ranging from trauma to disease, so it is important to take your  cat to a veterinarian for an examination as soon as possible if it is suffering.

There are numerous reasons why your cat may be experiencing abdominal pain. Cats are not normally expressive creatures when it comes to pain, but there are ways to detect if something is wrong in the abdominal region. Since the abdomen lies between the pelvis and the chest, a number of organs can be the culprit behind their pain.

Symptoms of Painful Abdomen in Cats

Your cat may not always show signs to indicate it is experiencing abdominal pain. Also, pain can, unfortunately, be referred to another area of the body that isn't the real sources. It is important to pay close attention to your cat to discover if it is experiencing abdominal pain. The main symptoms to look out for are listed below:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Blood in feces
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Change in appearance or posture (e.g. hunched over)
  • Tenderness/pain when touched
  • Weight loss

Causes of Painful Abdomen in Cats

A number of conditions can bring about abdominal pain in your cat, including:

  • Pancreatitis (inflammation in pancreas)
  • Constipation
  • Cancer
  • Poisoning
  • Ruptured bladder
  • Urinary obstruction
  • Dietary intolerance
  • Kidney stones
  • Ascites (buildup of fluid within abdominal cavity)
  • Bacterial infection (e.g. pyometra, salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis)
  • Parasites
  • Intestinal obstruction
  • IBD (inflammatory bowel disease)
  • Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, a fatal viral infection)

Diagnosis of Painful Abdomen in Cats

To diagnosis your cat's condition, the veterinarian will want a full medical history and will also conduct a thorough physical examination that may lead to further diagnostic testing. What you provide the vet can help immensely in narrowing down potential causes. Knowing if there has been any reaction to a specific type of food, exposure to dangerous substances or circumstances, and all of the other symptoms your cat has shown can aid in this process.

If the vet has determined further tests are required, there are a few common ones they will conduct. The common diagnostic testing includes a CBC (complete blood count), a urinalysis, and a biochemical profile. The three tests are generally used to check for signs of inflammation or infection, and to examine how well the organs are functioning. A fecal test may be conducted as well if parasites are suspected.

Your vet may also perform a biopsy or even a peritoneal fluid analysis, which checks the type of fluid in your cat's abdomen if fluid is detected. Lastly, an X-ray or ultrasound of the abdomen will be taken. These scans can discover any inflammation, tumors, kidney stones, or ruptures in the organs.

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Treatment of Painful Abdomen in Cats

Since there is a range of causes for abdominal pain, treatment plans may vary.

Surgery

If cancer or tumors have been found, the vet will almost certainly recommend surgery to remove it. A surgical procedure is also sought in the case of a ruptured bladder.

Medication

In the event of a parasitic infestation or a bacterial infection, your vet will prescribe a round of antiparasitic or antibiotics. Although these medications may come with risks (e.g. side effects, developing a resistance), the benefits typically outweigh those concerns. It is important that they are given as prescribed so that your cat will reap all of the benefits.

Some medications may be given as supportive care. If your cat is suffering significantly, your vet may recommend the use of pain medication for relief. Anti-nausea medicine may be given to help stop vomiting, and in the event of seizures (mainly due to poisoning), your cat may be given anti-seizure medication. Additionally, drugs that suppress the immune system may be prescribed, typically in the case of IBD.

Poison Treatment

When poisoning is the cause behind your cat's suffering, your vet will begin treatment immediately upon knowing which toxin was ingested, if possible. If your cat only recently swallowed the poison, its stomach will be emptied and activated charcoal or fluid therapy may be administered to help curb any ill effects.

Additional treatment methods may vary based on the specific toxin. For example, in rat poisoning, the vet may administer vitamin K.

Diet

In the event of IBD or other dietary complications, a change in diet tends may be the recommended plan of treatment. Your vet may recommend a hypoallergenic diet or even an elimination diet. Both can help with IBD as well as determining if your cat has an allergy.

Supportive Care

Beyond pain and anti-nausea medication, supportive care may include the administration of fluids to treat dehydration. Also, if your cat has the misfortune of being afflicted with FIP, supportive care may be the primary form of treatment, as the viral infection has a high mortality rate.

Recovery of Painful Abdomen in Cats

It is important to follow the treatment plan laid out by your veterinarian, especially if medicine has been prescribed. Prognosis will vary with the cause of abdominal pain. Relapse can occur from some conditions, and some be be chronic. IBD, for example, cannot be cured and is managed, rather than resolved. Keep a watch on your cat's appetite as well as any other symptoms. If they return, be sure to take your cat into see the veterinarian.

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Painful Abdomen Average Cost

From 344 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$800

Painful Abdomen Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Nala

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Bengal

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11 Months

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

My Bengal Cat what is 10 months old female cry’s everitme we touch her tummy She eats normal and drinks water She jumps and walks normal . Only timer she cry’s is when we touch her

Sept. 21, 2018

Nala's Owner

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Cinnabon

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American Shorthair

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11 Months

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Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Abdomen Pain

My male cat (turns 1 on October 3rd) is experiencing some issues with his abdomin. While I was petting him earlier today I went to scratch his stomach. He immediately showed signs of discomfort and became to let out smal cries. He is an generally an iside cat but occasionally will go outside but not for extended periods of time. I haven’t noticed any changes in his urination but he shares a little box with 1 other cat. He’s stool is regular. He hasn’t really been as active as he usually is (he likes to mimic Tom cruise in risky business on our wood floors) He eyes look kinda sappy .. like he just looks like he doesn’t feel well. Nose is wet and appetite is the same with no recent changes. I can’t afford a vet visit until next payday but this guy is very special to me. He Has also been nurtured and current on shots.

Sept. 13, 2018

Cinnabon's Owner

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Wesley

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Common

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1 Year

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Sensitive Belly Fever

My one year old Cat was fine yesterday, but this morning was sensitive in the sides behind his front legs. He also feels warm and is not moving much, just laying in his bed. He is an outside cat and the only thing that I can think of that is unusual is that he has caught a few crawdads lately and brought them home as a gifts as cats will do. It has been very rainy here. Any thoughts?

Sept. 11, 2018

Wesley's Owner

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Harley

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Calico / Siamese

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1 Year

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Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Aggression
Lower Abdominal Pain

I have 2 cats a 1 year old and a 6 month old, both females. We just recently got the kitten and we’ve moved recently as well. Ever since, our oldest cat has been in heat for the past 2 or 3 weeks and she acts very aggressively towards our younger kitten whenever she tries to play. Just today, I was petting my oldest cat and I noticed on her right side, lower towards the back legs when she’s laying on her stomach, whenever I touch there she cries. I’m not sure if this is why her behavior has been different or what but I really hope she does not have an illness of any kind. Both cats are not fixed but have an appointment in about a week.

Aug. 30, 2018

Harley's Owner

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Conrad

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Grey longhair

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1 Year

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Sensitive/Painful Abdomen
Weird Breathing (Strange Sounds)
Stomach Spasm

I just adopted a new cat two days ago. He is adjusting quite well, I’ve kept him in one room to get used to that for now and although he hid under my bed for awhile, he’s now beginning to explore and be more social. However, today I noticed that he keeps making these odd sounds, like he’s trying to cough up a hairball but isn’t. It sometimes sound a like a ducks quack. This isn’t happening continuously but every so often it will and it’s been going on since this morning. When it happens, I can see his stomach spasm. Along with this, I think his abdomen is sensitive to the touch— I was petting him and as my hand got to his stomach he meowed, I didn’t think much of that until later on when I touched the same area and he hissed at me (this is very unusual because he is a sweet boy). I wasn’t sure if he just has the hiccups or if this is a bigger issue. Do you think this is cause for concern?

Aug. 22, 2018

Conrad's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

I think that having an examination for Conrad would be a good idea, since you just got him. His coughing may be nothing to worry about, but cats can have asthma or heartworm disease that can cause those types of signs. I hope that all goes well for him.

Aug. 22, 2018

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Rabbit

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DOMESTIC

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8 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss

A stray male cat came here a few months ago he is not neutered. I fed him and let him live outside since I have three other cats who live in and go out some. My cats are all spayed and neutered. I named him Rabbit and he seemed to be very independent. In the past 2-3 months he eats in my house but has lost a lot of weight. He just seems to be getting sick. I feed my cats good quality cat food and they are all healthy. I worm all my cats regularly as precaution just as my Vet has advised me to do especially since they go outside. I also wormed the stray right along with my own cats. My cats have learned they can just pick on him, slap him when he walks close them. I am working hard to stop that. Rabbit comes in with scratches on his head, across his face and upper body. I do what I can with Chlorahexadine and Vetracin (did not spell them right, I know). He fusses a little but I can coax him into letting me clean up the wounds and put antibiotics in the deeper ones. I am so dumbfounded about the weight loss. He seems to be wasting away so much that his hip bones are extremely prominent. I don't know what to do since I live on social security and have limited funds to take him to the Vet. I am feeding Iams cat food to all of them and the others are doing well on it. The only thing is maybe tape worms? I know it seems as if I am neglecting him and I am stressed about it, trying to take care of my other three cat, my aging dog, and Rabbit (cat's name). It is 3:15 a.m. I am sitting here sharing this with you all and he is steadily meowing loudly like he wants out. I try so hard to get him to stay in where he can heal up before he has to go out and get cut up again. He tries to be friends with my cats and George Burns my one year old male and Rabbit get along pretty well. The huge solution would be to have him neutered. This year the animal shelter here stopped the partial payments to Vets to spay and neuter. You know it looks like there would be some type of hormone pill to neuter chemically. It worries me so that he is so skinny now. He does not vomit. He has a healthy appetite. He is active. He just cries and cries and I don't know if it is wanting out or pain. If anyone has any idea I will be grateful for the help. He sometimes gets on couch with me and lets me pet and talk so calmly to him. Can I just try a tape worm pill as a preventative? I even thought about going to our Farm Store purchasing Penicillin and give him a couple of shots. He is a sweet cat who does not deserve to be in pain or to be cut up. He seems to be maybe in the senior ages. He is not a young cat.

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Cino

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Norwegian longhaired Calico

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6 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Blood In Stool
Bloating
Difficulty Urinating
Less Active
Difficulty Pooing
Pain In Lower Abdomen

I have noticed the past few days, She has tried going to the bathroom every 5-10mins and nothing happens, she doesn’t seem to be in pain, but if I touch her where her stomach seems to be hard and bloated she gets very angry. Over the past few months, I’ve noticed twice that she had some blood in her poop but she seemed fine. She isn’t nearly as active, still eats, drinks a lot of water, but has been sleeping for the majority of the time and very needing to be attached to me.

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Laila

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Persian

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1 Month

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Urination Pain

My kitten is just 43 days old she z not eating since from 3 days only meowing and not passed urine and stool from 3 days...I think she will die but she is in pain wot to do????

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Shadow

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Long hair domestic

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12 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Skinny
Wont Eat
Hard Time Walking
Sleepiness
Sleeps Alot
Peeing Small Amount

My cat is 12 years old he limps around and doesnt eat alot only drinks and he sleeps alot. And I can also feel his spin I've been giving him bone strength meds but it's not work.I have to carry him up the stairs to help him up.

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Bella

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Demestic c

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8 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Crying And Crawling On Her Belly

My parents is looking after my sister cat. She been find all week until 2nite they gave her new food and straight after her eating she started crying and crawling on her belly, I've told them 2 give her some milk so she will have a poo and maybe that's what's up... any ideas why she is behaving like this would be a great help please xx

Painful Abdomen Average Cost

From 344 quotes ranging from $200 - $3,000

Average Cost

$800

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