Rupture of the Bladder Average Cost

From 211 quotes ranging from $1,500 - 6,000

Average Cost

$2,500

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What is Rupture of the Bladder?

Rupture in the bladder of your cat is a life-threatening condition that disrupts normal accumulation and movement of urine in your cat’s excretory system. The bladder is an important organ that is responsible for storing urine and allowing waste products to flush out of your cat’s system. When the bladder becomes ruptured, urine will pool in the abdomen of your cat. Both the rupture and accumulation of urine in the abdomen can present major medical issues for your cat. If you suspect that your pet has suffered a rupture in the bladder you should seek veterinary care immediately.

Symptoms of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Symptoms of a bladder rupture in your cat may not begin immediately. If the urine in your cat is sterile, there may be no immediate infection or discomfort. Eventually, your cat will begin to display symptoms which rapidly worsen until your cat is facing a life threatening battle. Symptoms of bladder rupture may include:

  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Straining to urinate
  • Blood in urine
  • Frequent visits to litter box
  • Signs of pain such as vocalization
  • Lethargy or lack of movement
  • Distension of the abdomen
  • Dehydration in the form of pale gums or skin that will not fall back into place when gently pinched
  • Hypothermia or inability to regulate body temperature

Causes of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Rupture of the bladder in cats occurs when a hole of varying size appears in the bladder wall, allowing urine to leak out into the abdomen. Injury most often occurs at the apex, or top, of the bladder, but can occur anywhere in the organ. The tear or hole has a variety of causes. Some of the most common include:

  • Traumatic injury
  • Puncture
  • Blockage of urethra
  • Tumors
  • Pelvic fracture
  • Injury during catheterization
  • Rupture during bladder palpation
  • Severe urinary tract infection

Diagnosis of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Your vet will begin the diagnosis of a rupture of the bladder in your cat with a thorough physical exam. You should let your veterinarian know if your cat has recently suffered any injury or trauma, as this can speed up the process and help pinpoint your cat’s condition. Your vet will look at your cat’s gums and will collect blood samples to test for various infections, in some cases, systemic sepsis. 

Your veterinarian will also test to see if your cat is dehydrated. This is done by gathering an area of skin on your cat, typically around the neck area, and pinching gently. In a healthy cat, the skin should fall back into place smoothly and rapidly. In a dehydrated cat, the skin will slowly fall back into place or not at all and retain some shape of the pinched skin.

The definitive tests for bladder rupture typically involve imaging. Your vet will perform ultrasounds in order to examine the structure of the bladder and check for any tears or holes. In some cases, your vet may also conduct an MRI using contrast dye injected into the bladder. This procedure is typically used to detect smaller leaks or holes. Finally, your vet may choose to order x-rays if trauma is suspected. This will allow the identification of broken bones or other injury. If fluid is detected in the abdomen your vet may collect it with the use of a fine needle in order to analyze whether it is urine or built up fluid from some other cause.

Treatment of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Your vet will initially treat your cat by stabilizing its vital signs. If your cat is suffering from dehydration, this will include administering intravenous fluids. Your veterinarian will also check heart rate and breath sounds to confirm they are stable enough to undergo surgery. Your vet will also drain excess urine and fluid from the abdomen with the use of a needle or catheter.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for bladder rupture in cats. This will involve your cat undergoing anesthesia. Anesthesia has a host of risks if your cat is not otherwise in healthy condition. During the surgery, your vet will use small dissolvable stitches to repair the tear or rupture. In a small number of cases, very minor tears or holes may be managed with the use of antibiotics and consistent draining of the abdomen.

Recovery of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Recovery and management of a bladder rupture in your cat will depend on the severity and cause of the underlying condition. If the veterinarian is able to repair the bladder and the condition has been caught early, your cat may make a full recovery. Your cat will need to stay several days in your veterinarian’s office as this is a major surgery. Afterwards, your cat will need a quiet place at home to finish healing.

Rupture of the Bladder Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Ming Ming
American Shorthair
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Urination Pain

My cat stayed overnight at the vet last night due to an obstructuion of the urinary track. This morning they showed me they had removed a whole lot of sand like particles that was blocking his track. I took him home and the whole day he was unable to urinate even though he kept trying. So i took him again and they tried to relieve him without sedation this time but were unable to. Now my cat is home again waiting for the anesthetic team in the morning. But he is in so much pain. He’s very vocal and is panting on the bathroom floor. Can’t move and loudly meows when i touch his belly. Is it possible that its just pain from the vet trying to get his urine out? Or could he be having other complications?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. MingMing needs to be seen at an emergency veterinarian right away to have sedation and an examination. If he has a urinary blockage, that can be a life threatening situation, and cannot wait until the morning.

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Gandalf
Domestic long hair
3 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

not drinking
Not Eating
make growling sounds never heard b4
Meows at regular intervals
Moves very little

I took my cat to the vet today because he was behaving very strangely. He was walking weirdly (kept his bottom low to the ground and took small steps) and didn't move often. The vet said he has a urinary blockage and that it needed to be taken out but as we couldn't afford the vet's costs we were told to take my cat to another vet practice in the morning. We took the cat home and he has barely moved since. He lets out little mews constantly and makes this sort of growling noise without opening his mouth. When i pet him (and i give him light touches) then the growling noises intensify. Should I just not pet my cat at all? Do those growling noises mean he does not like me at the moment or is it because he is in pain when I pet him? I am really worried about him and I hope that he will survive till morning so that proper treatment can be given.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Gandalf may not survive to the morning, and needs to have relief immediately if he has a urinary blockage - it is very surprising to me that the veterinarian that saw him allowed him to go home in that state. At the minimum, he needs to have his bladder drained, or he will go into kidney failure and may die of shock. A urinary blockage is an incredibly painful condition, and it would be best to take him to a veterinarian immediately. I hope that he is okay.

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Lucky
Small cat
8 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Licking at Genitals

My cat has been to the vet he got is back leg stuck he has has X-rays and they said cat will be fine and now the cat is just leaking wee all the time and keeps licking himself all the time

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Leaking of urine may be due to various reasons which may include a traumatic injury, stress or many other causes; you didn’t mention a timeline of events of how long ago this all started but give it a few days to see if there are any signs of improvement, if there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian for another examination to see what else may be going on with Lucky. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Odin
domestic short hair
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent Urination
Blood In Urine

I adopted my cat 2 weeks ago and had it to the vet last week. They ran tests to make sure the cat was all healthy since I mentioned it drank ALOT but he was constantly urinating also. Today he is barely urinating, only very small amounts at a time and there is now a little blood sometimes. He is making frequent trips to the litter box (every 10 mins) but only tiny amounts of urine each time. He is still drinking well. I made an appt for tuesday (3 days from now) but I'm wondering if that's too far away. He IS peeing just tiny amounts. Really didn't want an emergency vet bill if I could hold out but again I want what is best for my cat.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
It would be best to have Odin seen right away for this problem. Cats can have urinary blockages that quickly become life threatening, expensive problems. Since he is still passing urine, you may be able to get treatment for him before he actually develops a full blockage that will prevent that from happening. Waiting for 3 days will pretty much guarantee that he will end up at the emergency clinic between now and then. It is good that you are paying attention to him and noticed it so that you can get treatment for him.

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Bissou
Unknown
3 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Weakness
Bleeding
Loss of Appetite

Medication Used

Prazosin

Hi, I’m going to start from the very beginning because I don’t wanna leave any details out. I adopted my cat Bissou about 3 years ago, at the same time I adopted another cat too. They’ve been living together ever since, they practically grew up together since they were kittens when i found them. About a year ago I moved in with my boyfriend, but my cats stayed at my moms. Last Friday I brought Bissou over to my boyfriends and my apartment to live with us (we also have a 7 month old and 3 month old puppy) but left the other cat behind with my sister since he was technically hers. The first night we had him he peed and pooped all over my boyfriend. After that night he was always hiding behind something, for instance behind the tv. We left the apartment one day for work and he was behind the tv, when we got back he was in the same spot and had pee all over the door where he was sitting, he wasn’t going to the litter box. The next morning (tuesday) i woke up and found blood on him but diregarded it since my dog is in heat. I washed him off and three hours later i found blood again. I took him to the vet and they told me his bladder was possibly blocked. I explained to them i couldn’t pay the $2000 they were trying to charge me, i’m 20 y/o and this was super unexpected, they dropped the price down to $300 to only drain his bladder and give him antibiotics. they weren’t very clear on what to expect at home after my visit. He’s not eating at all, although he is drinking some water. I think he is peeing and trying to poop because i saw poop stains on his bed and he tries going in the litter box. But there’s way too much blood! They told me to expect some blood, but his legs and lower tummy are full of blood. he looks very weak and he doesn’t move from one spot unless it’s to go sleep at another spot. He really doesn’t look ok at all and i’m very worried. I was thinking of taking him today to get an x-ray done (they didn’t do so in the first place) but do you have any suggestions? I read it kay be stress related and was thinking of adopting another kitten for him to have company but i don’t know how to help him without being in debt.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
If Bissou has a urinary blockage and you aren't able to afford to treat him, draining his bladder and sending him home is irresponsible, as his bladder will just fill up again if the problem isn't fixed. He is probably suffering, and this is one of the few diseases that really need either treatment or humane euthanasia. That is a very sad situation, but it is true. It may be a good idea to get a second opinion. I'm sorry that that is happening to him, but above all, you need to make sure that he isn't suffering.

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joey
Feline
8 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Rapid breathing
Vocal
Open mouth breathing

My roughly 8 year old male cat has been having some very odd symptoms that started this morning. This morning i noticed he was breathing very rapidly and shallow with his mouth open. He looked like he felt VERY uncomfortable, dilated pupils as well, also walking oddly (hard to explain). he would not sit still and was constantly moving. He has not eaten yet this morning. He was constantly meowing as well

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without seeing Joey, I can't examine him or determine what might be going on with him, but from your description, it would be a good idea to take him to your veterinarian immediately. He sounds like he is in great distress, and needs medical attention. I hope that he is okay.

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Gandalf
Domestic long hair
3 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

not drinking
makes little growling sounds
Not Eating
Moves very little

Previously I asked a question regarding my male cat who visited the vet today and was diagnosed with FUS. Due to a hefty bill we were unable to get my cat sufficiently treated at the vet we visited and the vet sent him home telling us to go to a more affordable vet the next day. The reply I received from a veterinary profession from Wag! said they were very surprised that the vet sent my cat home and that he won't survive till morning. But unfortunately i forgot to mention that the vet did drain about 20 to 40 either grams or miligrams (I'm not all too sure right now ) of urine from his bladder before sending him on his way but the vet said that there is still a plug in his urethra which will get sorted out first thing tomorrow morning. I ask again if this new information changes the initial response i got and whether my cat will be able to survive for at least 12 hours until the more affordable vet opens?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Draining of the bladder would have given Gandalf more time for an affordable Veterinarian to be found, I generally find that most cities will have a charity clinic or other assistance to help with the cost of veterinary care. You should make a list of Veterinarians in your area and call them in the morning to find an affordable option for Gandalf. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Z
Male cat
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargic, unable to urinate

My 2 year old male cat's vet performed a cystocentesis to gather a urine sample and to relieve the pressure of his over extended full bladder. The vet said that the excessive licking of his penis and droplets of blood could be due to obstruction of urinary flow. He even noted that he saw crystallization on his privates just from his observation.

The next day, my cat can barely stand and walk. Is very lethargic. Doesn't drink or eat. I don't think he has even gone to the bathroom.

The dr. Prescribed an oral antibiotic for and infection based on the blood in his urine. He also injected him with a steroid for the inflammation around his genitals.

I am worried that he may have a ruptured bladder after reading online about how cystocentesis is not recommended on an extended bladder and by the symptoms he is displaying.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Care should be taken when performing a cystocentesis on a distended bladder as it is at a high risk of rupturing; however in some circumstances when other methods of decompression cannot be performed (i.e: cannot pass a catheter), a cystocentesis is a method of last resort. An intravenous pyelogram would show any leakage from the urinary bladder into the abdomen, you should return to your Veterinarian to discuss Z’s symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.acvs.org/small-animal/urinary-obstruction-cats

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Mickey
Siamese
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

lack of appetite

how likely is it my cat's bladder was ruptured while the vet took a urine sample. He was vomiting and I took him in for exam and they ran tests and then gave him subcutaneous fluids and injectable Cerenia. Since then he has had no appetite and just took his first drink on his own in 36 hours and has had no appetite. He was eating and drinking before he went to the vet.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Mickey may not have drank for a while if he didn’t feel thirsty due to the fluids which were administered; iatrogenic urinary bladder rupture is uncommon and you would also notice a lack of urination too which hasn’t been noted as a symptom. To check if the bladder has ruptured, a pyelogram is generally carried out to check for leakage of the bladder into the abdomen. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gizmo
British shor
6 Years
Critical condition
1 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

sick

I took gimo to the vets with cystitis symptoms he had before they gave him medicine took bloods and also drained his bladder with a needle told me the only risk was infection from the needle on leaving vets gizmo was sick and continued to get worse I thought it was medication as no mention of anything else I rushed him back to vets who told me to take him to other vets were they sent his results through so vet was treating him for blockage what he didn't no was that his bladder had ruptured and was rushed to surgery he is very ill I am so angry with first vet as he should of known surely or told me symptoms of possible burst bladder

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
I'm sorry that that is happening to Gizmo. A ruptured bladder is not a common side effect of urine collection, but it might be a good idea to discuss this with your veterinarian, as I don't know the details or what happened while he was there. I hope that he is okay.

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