Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Rupture of the Bladder in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost
Rupture of the Bladder in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

What is Rupture of the Bladder?

Rupture in the bladder of your cat is a life-threatening condition that disrupts normal accumulation and movement of urine in your cat’s excretory system. The bladder is an important organ that is responsible for storing urine and allowing waste products to flush out of your cat’s system. When the bladder becomes ruptured, urine will pool in the abdomen of your cat. Both the rupture and accumulation of urine in the abdomen can present major medical issues for your cat. If you suspect that your pet has suffered a rupture in the bladder you should seek veterinary care immediately.

Youtube Play

Rupture of the Bladder Average Cost

From 211 quotes ranging from $1,500 - $6,000

Average Cost

$2,500

Symptoms of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Symptoms of a bladder rupture in your cat may not begin immediately. If the urine in your cat is sterile, there may be no immediate infection or discomfort. Eventually, your cat will begin to display symptoms which rapidly worsen until your cat is facing a life threatening battle. Symptoms of bladder rupture may include:

  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Straining to urinate
  • Blood in urine
  • Frequent visits to litter box
  • Signs of pain such as vocalization
  • Lethargy or lack of movement
  • Distension of the abdomen
  • Dehydration in the form of pale gums or skin that will not fall back into place when gently pinched
  • Hypothermia or inability to regulate body temperature
arrow-up-icon

Top

Causes of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Rupture of the bladder in cats occurs when a hole of varying size appears in the bladder wall, allowing urine to leak out into the abdomen. Injury most often occurs at the apex, or top, of the bladder, but can occur anywhere in the organ. The tear or hole has a variety of causes. Some of the most common include:

  • Traumatic injury
  • Puncture
  • Blockage of urethra
  • Tumors
  • Pelvic fracture
  • Injury during catheterization
  • Rupture during bladder palpation
  • Severe urinary tract infection
arrow-up-icon

Top

Diagnosis of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Your vet will begin the diagnosis of a rupture of the bladder in your cat with a thorough physical exam. You should let your veterinarian know if your cat has recently suffered any injury or trauma, as this can speed up the process and help pinpoint your cat’s condition. Your vet will look at your cat’s gums and will collect blood samples to test for various infections, in some cases, systemic sepsis. 

Your veterinarian will also test to see if your cat is dehydrated. This is done by gathering an area of skin on your cat, typically around the neck area, and pinching gently. In a healthy cat, the skin should fall back into place smoothly and rapidly. In a dehydrated cat, the skin will slowly fall back into place or not at all and retain some shape of the pinched skin.

The definitive tests for bladder rupture typically involve imaging. Your vet will perform ultrasounds in order to examine the structure of the bladder and check for any tears or holes. In some cases, your vet may also conduct an MRI using contrast dye injected into the bladder. This procedure is typically used to detect smaller leaks or holes. Finally, your vet may choose to order x-rays if trauma is suspected. This will allow the identification of broken bones or other injury. If fluid is detected in the abdomen your vet may collect it with the use of a fine needle in order to analyze whether it is urine or built up fluid from some other cause.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Treatment of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Your vet will initially treat your cat by stabilizing its vital signs. If your cat is suffering from dehydration, this will include administering intravenous fluids. Your veterinarian will also check heart rate and breath sounds to confirm they are stable enough to undergo surgery. Your vet will also drain excess urine and fluid from the abdomen with the use of a needle or catheter.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for bladder rupture in cats. This will involve your cat undergoing anesthesia. Anesthesia has a host of risks if your cat is not otherwise in healthy condition. During the surgery, your vet will use small dissolvable stitches to repair the tear or rupture. In a small number of cases, very minor tears or holes may be managed with the use of antibiotics and consistent draining of the abdomen.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Worried about the cost of Rupture Of The Bladder treatment?

Pet Insurance covers the cost of many common pet health conditions. Prepare for the unexpected by getting a quote from top pet insurance providers.

Recovery of Rupture of the Bladder in Cats

Recovery and management of a bladder rupture in your cat will depend on the severity and cause of the underlying condition. If the veterinarian is able to repair the bladder and the condition has been caught early, your cat may make a full recovery. Your cat will need to stay several days in your veterinarian’s office as this is a major surgery. Afterwards, your cat will need a quiet place at home to finish healing.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Rupture of the Bladder Average Cost

From 211 quotes ranging from $1,500 - $6,000

Average Cost

$2,500

arrow-up-icon

Top

Rupture of the Bladder Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

dog-name-icon

Lucky

dog-breed-icon

Small cat

dog-age-icon

8 Years

thumbs-up-icon

2 found helpful

thumbs-up-icon

2 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Licking At Genitals

My cat has been to the vet he got is back leg stuck he has has X-rays and they said cat will be fine and now the cat is just leaking wee all the time and keeps licking himself all the time

July 7, 2018

Lucky's Owner

answer-icon

recommendation-ribbon

2 Recommendations

Leaking of urine may be due to various reasons which may include a traumatic injury, stress or many other causes; you didn’t mention a timeline of events of how long ago this all started but give it a few days to see if there are any signs of improvement, if there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian for another examination to see what else may be going on with Lucky. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 8, 2018

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

Bissou

dog-breed-icon

Unknown

dog-age-icon

3 Years

thumbs-up-icon

12 found helpful

thumbs-up-icon

12 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Loss Of Appetite
Bleeding
Weakness

Hi, I’m going to start from the very beginning because I don’t wanna leave any details out. I adopted my cat Bissou about 3 years ago, at the same time I adopted another cat too. They’ve been living together ever since, they practically grew up together since they were kittens when i found them. About a year ago I moved in with my boyfriend, but my cats stayed at my moms. Last Friday I brought Bissou over to my boyfriends and my apartment to live with us (we also have a 7 month old and 3 month old puppy) but left the other cat behind with my sister since he was technically hers. The first night we had him he peed and pooped all over my boyfriend. After that night he was always hiding behind something, for instance behind the tv. We left the apartment one day for work and he was behind the tv, when we got back he was in the same spot and had pee all over the door where he was sitting, he wasn’t going to the litter box. The next morning (tuesday) i woke up and found blood on him but diregarded it since my dog is in heat. I washed him off and three hours later i found blood again. I took him to the vet and they told me his bladder was possibly blocked. I explained to them i couldn’t pay the $2000 they were trying to charge me, i’m 20 y/o and this was super unexpected, they dropped the price down to $300 to only drain his bladder and give him antibiotics. they weren’t very clear on what to expect at home after my visit. He’s not eating at all, although he is drinking some water. I think he is peeing and trying to poop because i saw poop stains on his bed and he tries going in the litter box. But there’s way too much blood! They told me to expect some blood, but his legs and lower tummy are full of blood. he looks very weak and he doesn’t move from one spot unless it’s to go sleep at another spot. He really doesn’t look ok at all and i’m very worried. I was thinking of taking him today to get an x-ray done (they didn’t do so in the first place) but do you have any suggestions? I read it kay be stress related and was thinking of adopting another kitten for him to have company but i don’t know how to help him without being in debt.

June 28, 2018

Bissou's Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

12 Recommendations

If Bissou has a urinary blockage and you aren't able to afford to treat him, draining his bladder and sending him home is irresponsible, as his bladder will just fill up again if the problem isn't fixed. He is probably suffering, and this is one of the few diseases that really need either treatment or humane euthanasia. That is a very sad situation, but it is true. It may be a good idea to get a second opinion. I'm sorry that that is happening to him, but above all, you need to make sure that he isn't suffering.

June 28, 2018

Was this experience helpful?

Rupture of the Bladder Average Cost

From 211 quotes ranging from $1,500 - $6,000

Average Cost

$2,500

Need pet insurance?
Need pet insurance?

Learn more in the Wag! app

Five starsFive starsFive starsFive starsFive stars

43k+ reviews

Install


© 2022 Wag Labs, Inc. All rights reserved.