Soft Tissue Trauma Average Cost

From 259 quotes ranging from $200 - 1,000

Average Cost

$500

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What is Soft Tissue Trauma?

Bruises are a contusion with bleeding of the soft tissue and are usually caused by blunt trauma but can be secondary to a strain or sprain. A strain, also known as a pulled or torn muscle depending on the severity, occurs when the muscle fibres are stretched or torn because they are strained beyond their capacity. A sprain is a strained ligament and can range from being a moderate to a severe injury. Tendons can also experience soft tissue trauma from tendonitis, an inflammation of tendons usually caused by repetitive strain. Although repetitive strain injuries are not particularly common in cats, muscle pulls and sprains are as cats are prone to soft tissue injury from falls and accidents. It is important to clarify that soft tissue injury does not include broken bones or arthritis. 

Soft tissue trauma in cats involves injury to the muscles, tendons and ligaments that surround the cat's bones and joints. The functions of these soft tissues help us to understand how injury to these tissues affects your cat. Muscles provide posture and motion, tendons connect muscles to bones, and ligaments attach bones to other bones. Injuries that affect the functioning of these tissues include bruises, sprains, strains, and tears.

Symptoms of Soft Tissue Trauma in Cats

Symptoms of soft tissue injury include:

  • Bruising/hematoma (bleeding under the skin from burst capillaries)
  • Limping or lameness
  • Inflammation/swelling
  • Refusal or inability to bear weight
  • Inability to move joint (severe sprains)
  • Stiffness
  • Rapid breathing or other signs of stress
  • Paint/tenderness in affected area
  • Vocalization
  • Lack of appetite
  • Change in personality
  • Excessive licking of affected area

Causes of Soft Tissue Trauma in Cats

Soft tissue trauma is common in young active animals and kittens who are not aware of their limits and may attempt jumps that result in falls. Roughhousing or play with other animals can result in injury, as being underfoot can result in injuries.

The following can cause crushing, bruising, stretching, tearing or rupture to soft tissues in your cat. 

  • Obese animals - weight results in increased stress on muscles, tendons and ligaments
  • Car accidents
  • Falls
  • Abuse
  • Fights - animal attacks
  • Household accidents
  • Strain from over exercise or exertion
  • Repetitive strain (not common in cats)

Diagnosis of Soft Tissue Trauma in Cats

Your veterinarian will conduct a complete physical examination of your cat to determine the location and extent of the soft tissue injury. Your veterinarian will ask you about any trauma or incidents your cat has been involved in that may have caused the injury. Usually an X ray to rule out fracture will be ordered. In older animals, your veterinarian will also want to rule out arthritis as a cause of your pet’s symptoms. In the absence of a fracture or arthritis, a diagnosis of soft tissue injury will most likely be made. On occasion, ultrasound or MRI can be used to support soft tissue trauma diagnosis and provide additional information.

Treatment of Soft Tissue Trauma in Cats

Your veterinarian will provide supportive care as necessary which may include anti inflammatories to reduce swelling and medication for pain. In addition, sedation to quiet a distressed cat with a severe soft tissue injury may be necessary to cam the cat and prevent aggravation of the injury.

Severe sprains involving ligaments or injury to tendons may require splinting. A tear to a ligament may require surgery to repair if severe. 

The treatment your veterinarian will prescribe for most soft tissue injury is rest. Depending on the location and cooperativeness of your pet, ice packs may help decrease swelling and bruising. Bandaging may be effective in providing compression and support to a strained or sprained soft tissue injury. 

Most soft tissue injuries resolve themselves with time and prognosis is good. Your veterinarian may suggest physiotherapy in certain situations if needed to regain function.

Recovery of Soft Tissue Trauma in Cats

In order for healing of soft tissue trauma to occur, you should ensure your cat rests and restrict activity. If necessary, you may need to restrict your pet to cage rest to ensure this. Your cat should avoid playing, cat trees, stairs, outdoor activity and access to other animals that could cause your cat to re-injure themselves. It usually takes about two weeks for your cat to recover from a soft tissue injury, but you should restrict activity until several days after limping is gone. A sudden increase in inactivity can lead to relapse. Return to your veterinarian for follow up if the injury does not resolve. If limping ceases, no follow up is necessary.

Soft Tissue Trauma Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Meisha
Siamese
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My cat was attacked by 2 Siberian Huskies that are about a year old on Tuesday November 21, 2017. She was rushed to the vet. Surprisingly she didn't have any puncture wounds and no broken bones. She hasn't left her box except to urinate.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
This is a highly traumatic experience for a cat and although (thankfully) she had no puncture wounds, she may have some soft tissue injuries which are sore or painful; give her time to recuperate and ensure that she is drinking and eating (as well as doing her business). If you don’t see any improvement over the weekend, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Money
Siamese mix
9 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Listless, limping
Listless. licking area constantly.

My 9 year old siamese suffered a bad fall 2 weeks ago. Nobody saw her fall but she had fallen from the roof of our house and into a leaves-filled trash bin. She has been limping ever since. We did take her to the Vet and conducted X-rays which ruled out any fracture or broken bones of any kind but she is still limping and although she is eating and drinking as normal, an otherwise active cat, she has been mostly sitting around listlessly. I have noticed a depression on her right back leg ever since the fall. It looks as though it might be a soft tissue trauma, but i couldn't be sure. Apart from her pain medicine that has been prescribed and restriction of motion, are there any other home remedies that i can carry out like hot or cold packs? Will the depression of muscle regrow for her age?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
You may be seeing some muscle atrophy there due to the injury, it is difficult to say what the outcome will be without examining Money but it is encouraging that there was nothing broken. Rest is very important and you should be restricting her movements so she isn’t jumping around the house (or off the house) and give her time to recuperate; passive movement of her limbs may help, but you may need to start looking at laser therapy to see if that can offer any help. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Muning
Abyssinian
6 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

My daughter accidentally stepped on our 6 months old cat. I noticed a bit of swelling on her right back leg joint. It’s been 3 days and she is still limping. I did not bring her to the vet thinking she was fine and no broken bones because she let me touch and inspect her leg. Please advise.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
Sometimes stepping on a leg can cause a sprain or ligament damage and not a fracture; it is important though that you visit your Veterinarian for an examination so that they can assess the injury and so that Muning can get some pain relief as required. Strict rest is important and restricting movement is key, so no jumping or running around the house. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Blu
Blue Point Siamese
5 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

I have a blue point Siamese who now refuses to put weight on his front left paw. When touched it doesn’t bother him; nor does touching the leg. I am afraid of what this could be because he is both an indoor and outdoor cat. Blu is himself 5 years old.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
If Blu is limping, you should restrict his movement and place him in a cat carrier if necessary so he is not climbing over the furniture or jumping around outside; give him the weekend and if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bean
tabby
7 weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Loss of Balance
Wobbly
Lethargy
lack of appetite

We have a small stray kitten that's been hanging out around here with it's siblings we moved them all indoors and they were doing great. The other day I noticed that Bean was laying under the rest of them and didn't seem right when i pulled her out she couldn't walk her head was swaying side to side and it seemed the movement went all the way down her body and her tail would sway the opposite as the head movements. She is unable to walk, or crawl. Today she was laying on her side and her legs were moving like she was walking. There is no swelling anywhere, however, there is a small abrasion on her chin. What should I do? i have her separated from the others in a warm comfortable limited space, and i have been able to get some milk replacer in her, but she has less interest in food today. Any idea's as to the cause?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
There are a few possible causes for these symptoms which may include trauma, congenital anomalies, infections, malnourishment, toxins, liver shunt among other causes; I would be more tempted to lean towards something like cerebellar hypoplasia or cerebellar abiotrophy, more kittens could be affected but not showing symptoms. I would definitely get Bean into your Veterinarian for a once over to check and rule out other causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/cerebellar-hypoplasia https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/degeneration-cerebellum

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Willow
Maine Coon
1 year 4 months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My just over one year old female cat was sick couple of days ago and kept falling over ..took her to vet blood tests fine and she had two injections ..two days on she not falling but wobbly ..may she have pulled a muscle in her side? She eating etc just unsteady on her feet

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
If Willow has been a bit wobbly I would think it is more likely that there is a spinal issue causing some pain; with rest and movement restriction it should improve and it sounds like it is improving already. I would let her rest for around a week or so and see how she is, if there is still an unsteady gait I would suggest visiting your Veterinarian again and having an x-ray. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Radagst
Turkish Angora
3 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My three year old cat has been limping and even walking on three legs at times. Other times he's fine and walks and runs no problem. I looked at his paw and saw nothing wrong. I gently squeezed it too and he didn't even flinch. Not Quite sure what could be happening.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
Without examining Radagst I cannot say what the cause is, even then if the cause is intermittent I may still not be able to catch the problem in the act. In these cases we generally recommend strict rest in a cat carrier if possible to prevent jumping on furniture etc… for around a week to see if there is any improvement, just letting him out to go to the litter box. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Paisley
American Shorthair
2 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My two month old kitten was limping this morning and is in pain when she walks as she cries doibg so, especially when I pick her up; I do it to help her go to the cat box and eat. She still tries to jump on things around the house. She has been sleeping and less active than normal and I am wondering if there is any way I can alleviate her pain with OTC medication. Also, what is the best way to ice her leg?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
With minor injuries, rest is best; I wouldn’t advise any over the counter medication as pain relief may lead to increased activity which may cause further injury. I would place strict rest on Paisley, even placing her in a cat carrier to reduce movement if required; if you do not see any improvement over the next few days visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Willow
moggy
11 weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

Hello
My 11 week old kitten fell off the chair 12 hrs ago. At first she wouldnt put her right back leg on the floor but she still wanted to jump around and was eating ok. I stayed up with her all night and this morning she puts the leg on the floor but is limping so seems to have improved. She has eaten her breakfast today. I have put her in a spare room with food water her litter tray and bed.
Do I need to take her to the vet? Or will a few days of rest make her better?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
For a fall like this, rest may really be best; restricting movement and not allowing any jumping or running can help. Rest can be tried for a few days but if you are not seeing any improvement over the next two days I would take her in to your Veterinarian for a check of the paw. Since injuries may resolve quickly but others like ligament injury may take some time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Angel
Tuxedo
12 weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Limb Swelling

An EE Cable box dropped from the top of my cupboard and unfortunately landed on my kitten harming her paw on the right hand side and she walks with a limp this happened today so I hope she gets better within time but is there any advice that you can provide me she was bleeding from the (thumb) claw I am very worried as she isn’t walking on the paw. I guess cause she’s in pain. What do I do ?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations
It is important to ensure that the bleeding has stopped and the wound is kept clean (especially after using the litter box); keep Angel rested to prevent further injury to the paw. If you suspect that there is a break or other skeletal issue (or an injury to the claw), it would be best to visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Shadow
Domestic shorthair
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Limping

My cat was diagnosed with soft tissue trauma in back right leg after falling from chair. The vet prescribed pain medicine, but she is hiding under the bed and I don't want to pull her out to give the medicine. I have put food and water bowls under the bed for her and she is eating and drinking and the litter box is also nearby. I don't want to make her hate me, so is it best to let her just stay under the bed to rest and not worry about the pain medicine?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1724 Recommendations

It is best to leave her food and water close to her, but in a place where she needs to leave the comfort of her hiding place. It would be best for her to get her medication and if you catch her whilst she goes to get a drink or some food, you are not stressing her by pulling her from under the bed. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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