Umbilical Hernia Average Cost

From 376 quotes ranging from $400 - 1,200

Average Cost

$950

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What is Umbilical Hernia?

If you notice an abnormal outward bulge sticking out from your kitten’s naval area, he or she could have an umbilical hernia. Umbilical hernias can occur shortly after birth if the opening in the abdomen that was once used for nutritional passage does not close. The majority of umbilical hernias will not cause any harmful effects to the infant and will go away on their own when the feline reaches six months. Unfortunately, other umbilical hernias can trap part of the intestine and the hernia soon becomes a medical emergency.

Symptoms of Umbilical Hernia in Cats

All umbilical hernias will cause an outward bulging in the area of the umbilicus or belly button. The hernia is soft to the touch and easily pushes inward, bouncing back to its original outward position. Some umbilical hernias make a gurgling sound when pressure is applied, indicating that a section of intestine has seeped through, whereas other make no sound. The majority of feline umbilical hernias do not show any additional symptoms other than the visible abnormality of the abdomen. However, some hernias can cause symptoms such as: 

  • Depression 
  • Anorexia 
  • Vomiting 
  • Pain in the swollen area
  • Unusually large umbilical hernia that is warm to the touch

If your kitten is experiencing any of the above symptoms, or if you hear a gurgling sound when pressure is applied to the affected area, seek the advice of a veterinary professional promptly. Your young cat could be suffering from a more serious type of umbilical hernia in cats, called a complicated umbilical hernia. 

Types

An umbilical hernia in cats can either be classified as uncomplicated or complicated. 

Uncomplicated Umbilical Hernia

An uncomplicated umbilical hernia is a hernia that may come and go, appearing as a soft swollen protrusion from the abdomen. An uncomplicated umbilical hernia does not cause the feline to deplete in overall health and may correct itself on its own when the kitten reaches six months of age. 

Complicated Umbilical Hernia 

A complicated umbilical hernia appears as a soft protrusion from the abdomen, but in this case, the abdominal organs have passed through the abdominal muscle within the hernia. The section of intestine entrapped in the hernia can lose blood circulation and die, causing the young cat to become ill. Complicated umbilical hernias will not go away on their own and require surgical care.

Causes of Umbilical Hernia in Cats

An umbilical hernia in cats is caused by an incomplete closure of the feline’s abdominal muscles shortly after the time of birth. Inside the womb, a kitten’s abdominal muscle are open to allow the passage of nutrients from mother to infant. This abdominal opening is called an umbilical ring and the umbilical blood vessel, or cord, attaches baby to the mother. As the kitten is born, the umbilical blood vessel is pulled, eventually snapping off, which in turn pulls the abdominal wall. In most cases, this naturally occurring action of birth doesn’t result in a hernia, but for unknown reasons, some infants develop the condition.

Some feline bloodlines do show a pattern of umbilical hernias, suggesting umbilical hernias could be part of a genetic predisposition. Orphan kittens have developed umbilical hernias due to incidental trauma and over handling by their caregivers. Rubbing the underbelly of the kitten to stimulate defecation and urination, for example, could easily cause trauma to the naval region.

Diagnosis of Umbilical Hernia in Cats

An umbilical hernia in cats can usually be identified through a physical examination, as the 1-2 ½ cm abdominal protrusion can be visually noted. During the physical examination, your veterinarian may ask you questions such as:

  • When did you first notice the umbilical hernia?
  • Has it grown since the first day you noticed it?
  • Has your kitten been eating, drinking, defecating, and urinating on a regular basis?
  • Has the feline expressed any pain or discomfort in her abdomen? Has she bitten or scratched you during handling? 

Depending on your kitten’s symptoms and the diagnostic findings your veterinarian made on the physical exam, an abdominal ultrasound or x-ray may be requested. Through an ultrasound or x-ray, your veterinarian will be able to determine if a section of the intestine has been entrapped within the hernia. The diagnostic findings your veterinarian makes will aid him or her in treating your kitten appropriately.

Treatment of Umbilical Hernia in Cats

Treatment is not always necessary in umbilical hernia cases. Uncomplicated hernias often correct themselves before the time of sterilization (removal of reproductive organs) at about six months of age, and do not recur. If the hernia does not correct itself by the time of sterilization, however, your veterinarian may recommend surgical correction. Complicated umbilical hernias are also always treated with surgery, as necrotic tissue of a section of the intestine is a potential threat. In an umbilical hernia surgery, any scar tissue that has formed will be removed and the umbilical ring closed with sutures. 

Recovery of Umbilical Hernia in Cats

The prognosis for felines with an umbilical hernia is excellent, even for those who have undergone surgical correction. To avoid complications following the procedure, your veterinarian may ask you to check the surgical site a couple of times a day. If you note any bleeding or signs of infection, contact your veterinarian immediately. Keep your kitten clean, comfortable and safe in a small area of the house to prevent the sutures from coming out of place. In general, very few kittens experience post-surgery complications and the hernia does not reoccur. 

Umbilical Hernia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Lala
Persian Cat
3 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Loss Of Appetite, skinny, lethargy
Loss of Appetite

Hi! I am very worried about my kitten lala. She has this hernia when i brought her home. The last owner said that she had it since birth. She's so small for being 3 months. She doesnt like to eat that much. She does't poop at a regular basis. She's so skinny. What should i do? Thank you very much.

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Molly
Black cat
6 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

don't drink a lot
defecate and urinate normally
eats normally

Hi, my kitten is now 6 weeks old. I have it since week 4 because the mother ate the 3 other kittens and wasn't feeding her last kitten anymore. I have noticed an hernia on her belly that seems bigger compared to 2 weeks ago.The skin is soft when I touch it, but when I push on it with my finger, it feels like different kinds of abnormal things are present in there.She eats normally as well as defecating and urinate on a regular bassis. The only thing I have noticed is that she don't drink a lot, even if I gave her milk with a syring. Doesn't seems to be painfull, but sometimes sge starts bitting me when I palp it. I don't know if it's abnormal, but eshe sleeps a lot compared to my 4 years old cat.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
A kitten will sleep more than an adult cat so this is normal, also most small hernias comprise of fat; however if there is a pain response on palpation I would recommend having a Veterinarian examine the area to determine if there is anything to be concerned about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Can the umbilical cord hernia cause a spinal injury in a kitten

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Dots
mixed
1 Week
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Red puffy bulge

Will my week old kitten live if it has a hole were its belly bottom should be. It's seeping fluid and momma won't stop licking it. But she isnt killing the kitten.it is still nursing and still going potty.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
If there is a hole at the umbilicus you should visit a Veterinarian for an examination as there is a concern of secondary infection; if there is a bulge or anything else it may be an umbilical hernia or there may be an infection/abscess. This is something you should visit a Veterinarian about immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Simba
tabby
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

none

My cat had corrective surgery and we have taken him home it's been 4 days and his lump seems to be a little bigger should I take him to the hospital there is no sign of infection or bleeding

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
The incision where the umbilical hernia was repaired may have some swelling after surgery as a reaction to the surgery, and that should get smaller over time. Since I cannot see Simba, however, it would be a good idea to have a recheck of the area to make sure that the sutures have not broken down or that he is having larger problems with the surgery site. Most veterinarians will not charge for a post-operative recheck, so a recheck to give you peace of mind would be a good idea.

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Jeremiah
grey tabby
7 Weeks
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My kitten Jeremiah had a quarter sized bump on his bellybutton. He is 7 weeks old, eats and drinks just fine and there is no problem when he plays with his sister. Being a nurse I had to check it out. It feels like a fatty tumor and it doesn’t hurt him when I touch it. Any suggestions?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Many times umbilical hernias are just fat which has passed through the abdominal wall, however it is recommended to have then repaired as you will know any hernia that involves any intestine may become strangulated and is a medical emergency. I would have your Veterinarian check the hernia and have it corrected at the time of neutering. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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pit
Tuxedo
3 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

nothing

hi i will like to ask i have 2-3 month kitten i notice last week that he have something on his belly its look like a lump but i was reading some informatio about.this website and i think its the same thing but my kitten doesn't vommiting hes eating well playing around but i dont know exactly what he has on the belly it coming in and coming out

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
From your description, that does sound like it might be a hernia, and depending on how large the hernia is, it may need medical attention sooner, or later. If it is small, and not bothering him, it can be repaired when he is a little older. If it is large and there is a risk for intestines become trapped outside his body, it should be taken care of sooner. Without seeing him, it is difficult for me to judge, and it would be best to see a veterinarian to have the lump assessed. I hope that everything goes well for him!

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Ren
Cat
6 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

none
Milky yellow like discharge from va

My cat gave birth Saturday night to 2 kittens. By 5 PM on Sunday she had a 3rd that was deformed and died later the following day. My cat doesn't leave the box, she's not eating and us very lethargic. She also has milky yellowish discharge from vaginal area with cottage cheese like bits.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Any discharge like you’re describing should be seen by your Veterinarian immediately as it may be indicative of infection especially if there were issues queening; normally we would expect to see a reddish brown discharge after queening. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Willow
Calico
7 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia

My cat has had an umbilical hernia ever since we first got her. She is now almost 7 months old and it has grown probably twice if not triple it's size. She eats A LOT and uses the bathroom frequently. Her feces is pretty strong smelling. She does seem to exhibit pain when it's touched. Is this something that needs to be taken care of right away or is it something that can wait a month or two?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Umbilical hernias can be unpredictable and we are usually relaxed about them unless they grow in size or change colour; since the hernia has grown in size I would recommend that you go into your Veterinarian and consider having corrective surgery done, spaying and hernia correction can be combined into a single surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ginger
Main Coon
8 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Swolleb
Has a red lump on
Swollen Abdomen

Medication Used

None(I'm not sure)

So i think my kitten has either umbolical or abdominal hernia because i just noticed that it has a small sort of red lump on his belly. I want to know how can i treat and cure the kitten without surgery or is it necessary?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
A red lump at the umbilicus may be due to an infection there or something else like an umbilical hernia; generally umbilical hernias require surgical correction since very few will resolve on their own, there is no ‘at home’ treatment for umbilical hernia. However, you should visit your Veterinarian in case the lump is an infected umbilicus. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Olley
Siamese
8 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Bulging hernia

My mother just brought home a kitten who is now 7-8 weeks old now. He is extremely active, eats well, uses the bathroom frequently, drinks water, and every other thing kittens usually do. However, his hernia is between the size of a quarter and half dollar and bulges away from his belly about an inch and the usual kitten things like jumping from couches and tumbling around freaks me out even if it doesn't seem to bother him, it feels a bit squishier in the weekish we have had him. What advice would you give? Our vet said that he would be fine until he got fixed, but I am concerned and looking for a second opinion.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
If he seems to be doing well, you should be fine to monitor him until he is neutered and have the hernia repaired at that time. The only down side to waiting is the possibility that intestines might get caught outside of his body, and that is a very painful emergency. If he is acting normally generally, it doesn't appear that you need to rush the repair.

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Jeremiah
Barn cat
12 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

none

Jerry has an umbilical hernia. It doesn’t hurt him at all and all functions are normal. It gets big and then small. Very weird. Waiting until he gets clipped to have it surgically fixed. Could it be something else since it changes size?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Umbilical hernias will often change in size, as fat can move through that space. Depending on how large it is, there may be a danger of intestines coming through, but your veterinarian can assess that for you and let you know if he should be neutered and have that repaired earlier than planned.

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athena
Siamese tabby mix
6 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Umbilical hernia

Athena, is a stray I took in about 4-5 days ago, she appears to be only 5-6 weeks old weighs 1.50lb. We took her to vet they said she has an umbilical hernia. She is very active, eats and drinks normally, performs bodily functions perfectly, no runny poo, strong urine, is very playful.the hernia is about the size of a dime, no pain when touched. Need advice on what to do. It does look a tad bit bigger today.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Umbilical hernias often need to be repaired, if they are reducible hernias. Depending on the size of the hernia relative to the cat, they are usually either repaired at the time of a spay, or they may need repair earlier if there is a risk of intestinal herniation. Since I cannot see Athena or examine her, I'm not sure if the hernia needs to be repaired, and if so, if it can wait until her spay surgery. It would be best to ask your veterinarian , as they saw her and know the extent of the hernia.

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Thor
Kitten
2 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

very small bump on belly

I just adopted a kitten from the shelter and he came neutered already. At the time, they didn't notice his extremely tiny (sometimes we can't even find it) umbilical hernia. I noticed it however the first day we had him at home. I checked with one vet and she said it's the smallest she's ever seen and since it's so small it's nothing to worry about. Another vet told me within that same week that we should get it corrected with surgery (he's only 2 months and still very young). A friend who is a vet tech told me that it can be solved by pushing it in a few times a day and by 6 months at such a small size can sometimes solve itself. With so many different opinions I'm not sure what to do. I would just have it fixed right away if it weren't for the high cost of surgery and his young age.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Some umbilical hernias may self resolve within six months of age, however surgical correction is best just in case since strangulation of intestines or any other organ passing through a hernia is a medical emergency and may occur even with a small defect. For the time being I don’t think there is an urgency and I would keep an eye on it for now, but consider getting it corrected in the future if it doesn’t self resolve. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Fermion
Russian Blue
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
Weight Loss
Lethargy
lack of appetite
Vomiting

Medication Used

Prednisolone

Can umbilical hernias affect an old cat? My cat is 13, and her whole litter has umbilical hernias as kittens. They all had surgery. I adopted her from a breeder, who told me about the surgery, but said I didn’t need to worry about it. I soon forgot. 13 years later, my cat has been a regular vomiter for probably 12 years. But recently it has increased to multiple times per day. She has other health issues, and this piece went untreated until she began losing weight and not eating. I got her an ultrasound, and ultrasound vet’s results were pancreatitis and “moderate diffuse infiltrative small intestinal disease DDx Lymphoma vs IBD, less likely eosinophilia enteritis.”
I have not yet gone in for a second opinion from another vet. She has been getting steroid injections every 3-4 weeks, and had all but stopped puking. The last 4 days she has vomited 7 times. Is it possible she’s had a looped hernia this whole time, and only now experiencing symptoms worse than regular vomiting? Would that have been apparent from the ultrasound if the vet was unaware of her history? I am afraid to ask my regular vet because I don’t trust her.

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Cheech
Ragdoll cross
25 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Swollen bloated belly

My 5mth old kitten was diagnosed with an uncomplicated umbilical hernia vet said that the repair could be done alongside the operation for spaying her when she is 6/7 months old my kitten shows no signs of discomfort appetite great toilet needs brilliant no concerns until last couple of days I'm sure her belly seems swollen bloated like I'm assuming she isn't old enough to be full term pregnant my concern is my older female was in a coma for 3 days nearly died took 8 days to stabilise her vet adamant poisoned not a clue what could my kitten be showing symptoms of poison

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
At 25 weeks, it is nearly time for spaying and you should visit your Veterinarian for a discuss on this; however, the bloating may be caused by a variety of conditions and if it is determined to be ‘poisoning’ it can be difficult to narrow in on what specific poison was consumed. Bloating may be caused by parasites, infections, diet among many other conditions; visit your Veterinarian on Monday for an examination but if there is swelling or pain around the umbilical hernia site you should visit an Emergency Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Smokie
Rescue
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hernia

My kitten is 5-6 months old and seems to have a hernia, it is a small bulge out side of his tummy on the bottom half. it doesn’t bug him, he doesn’t meow or seem to be in pain when it gets touched and he is eating and drinking as normal,

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Some animals do have hernias, and there are different kinds. If it doesn't seem to be affecting him, it may not need to be repaired, but if it is a reducible hernia, it would be best to have that fixed. We often repair these things at the time of a spay or neuter, and Smokie is old enough to be neutered. It would be a good idea to make an appointment with your veterinarian, have them examine him and check out the hernia, and let you know if it needs to be repaired or not.

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Sugar
Tiger striped farm cat
2 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hiccup/gag

Medication Used

none

Hi, I have a 2 month old kitten. We think she has an umbilical hernia, though it hasn't officially been diagnosed by a vet. We noticed the hernia just a day or two ago. Within just the past 12 hours, I've seen her having two bouts of this hiccupping/gagging. It only lasts a minute. She seems to have no pain around the hernia area (about the size of a dime or nickle), including when I push it back in. Could this hiccupping and gagging thing she does be related to the hernia and/or conclude whether it is complicated or uncomplicated?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
The hernia and hiccuping are likely not related. If you are able to push the hernia back in, it needs to be repaired, and we usually do that at the time of a spay. The hiccuping/gagging may be a short term problem if she is otherwise healthy, but can be related to parasites, and it might be a good idea to have her examined by a veterinarian.

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Jerry
Barn cat
10 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Quarter size
It is a quarter size hernia
It is a quarter size hern

Jerry is 10 weeks old and had a hernia. He has no pain even with manipulation. He plays really rough with his sister so I know it doesn’t bother him at all. When we hold him up it disappears. It is growing with him, maybe quarter size. Any suggestions?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
That sounds like a fairly large hernia that Jerry has, and the best thing to do would be to have it surgically repaired. There is the possibility with a hernia of intestines becoming entrapped in the hernia if it is large enough, and is seems that this one may be. You can have a veterinarian look at it to make sure since I cannot see him, but having it surgically repaired is often needed.

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Shiro
moggy
2yrs
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

skinny
Urinating Outside Litterbox
Hernia

Hi, my two year old cat Shiro has had an umbilical hernia since the day I brought her home. She is spayed, and at the time I didn't have the finances to remove it during spaying. It has grown nor shrunk since then, but I'm wondering if it's time to think about removing it? Are there any serious health risks associated with her having it? And vice versa with it being removed? She has always been a small cat, drinks a lot and doesn't eat too much. She also peed all around the house when I'm not home (assuming that's anxiety) Otherwise very happy and healthy. Thanks!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Some cats have umbilical hernias all their life without incident and others have emergency surgery due to complications arising from the hernia; it is best to have the surgery to remove any risk of complications or other issues from the hernia. Shiro is still young and should tolerate the surgery well, it is a straightforward procedure as simple as a spay procedure so there is little to worry about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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unnamed
stray
13 Days
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

bloating or umbilical hernia

My kitten with her other 2 siblings are 13 days old now, but I noticed that she is a bit smaller than the others in growing for some reason, I'm not sure why, and yesterday (12 days old) We noticed a red large hard bump near her naval area on the left side. She's been fed normally and cleaned by mom cat, but I'm worried about how she is right now. Due to financial difficulty, i was wondering if there was a good way to solve this problem, Reading on the sites, I'm not exactly sure if it is bloating or umbilical hernia because they sound similar when I read them, so I'm not very sure if it will pass or if I have to do something immediately.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Without examining the kitten I cannot confirm whether the cause is an umbilical hernia, an abscess or something else; you should have the kitten checked by a Veterinarian to see what it is especially if it is red in colour. You can try searching for a charity clinic in your area to give the kitten a check over to determine the cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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lilly
white and black alley cat
7 Days
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

eyes closed
Vomiting
puss coming out of belly button

my kittens mom left it and wont feed it and it hasn´t been fully weaned so i took it home and its eyes aren´t even open yet i think its almost a week old and its umbilical cord is infected and puss is coming out and i don´t have money for a vet and i love her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Unfortunately Lilly does need to be seen by a Veterinarian for treatment as there is not an effective at home treatment. You should try looking for nearby charity clinics or contacting nonprofits for assistance; I’ve popped a link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.dogingtonpost.com/need-help-with-vet-bills-or-pet-food-there-are-resources-available/

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Gigi
tabby
8 Days
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Itching

I am very worried about my 8 year old cat. She began just hitting the hair off her stomach and I have taken all basic measures to see if it was anything common, but to no avail. Now it looks really red and irritated and it seems to be circles around just one main spot on her tummy. It looks like a hole in her tummy that goes inward like a belly button. It does not hurt her if I push on it at all.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If Gigi does have a hernia in her body wall, it might be bothering her and causing her to groom the hair from that spot. She may also have a bacterial or fungal infection. Since she doesn't seem to be leaving it alone, it would be best to have her examined by your veterinarian before it gets worse - your veterinarian will be able to examine her, see if that is actually a hernia, and prescribe any therapy that will help. I hope that all goes well for her!

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Nala
Not sure
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Laying around alot

my cat gave birth about 4 weeks ago and after 2 weeks of them being born she quit feeding them and kept leaving them, shortly they all died. and now she has an outward bulge on the bottom of her belly on both sides. she doesn't show any pain when I pick her up or push on it. but he nipples are really swollen too. what is it? what can I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Without examining Nala I cannot determine whether the bulges are due to hernias (inguinal hernias are uncommon in cats) or another cause; the mammary glands may be inflamed due to lack of nursing and applying a warm compress to the glands may offer some relief. However, it would be advisable to visit your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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none
Persian
3 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

does not bother her.

HI, I am hoping to get a little insight. I am about to take a kitten who is 3 months old. She has a dime sized umbilical hernia. The owner said the kitten is fine, it doesn't bother her a bit and it's easy to get repaired when she is spayed. I have no problem doing this. My question - is it an expensive surgery? If it's not a complicated surgery and can be done while she is being spayed how much is a ball park to expect? A few hundred? The owner is a vet tech, while I am not, so I will have to pay this expense. I realize it depends on the severity, and the area and Doctor. But, just a guesstimate would help me decide if I want to take this on. I don't mind if it's a few hundred, I just can't afford a thousand dollar surgery.

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Kasper
Siamese
1 Week
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

throwing up occasionally

My Cat has had an umbilical hernia since birth, he is now 1.. should i get it repaired or will it go away on its own? will it cause problems if he doesn’t have surgery?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Some umbilical hernias cause no problems and an animal may leave a full uneventful life while others may have complications and require emergency surgery. It is always best to have an umbilical hernia repaired to remove the risk of complications and is generally done the same time as castration; you should discuss with your Veterinarian about your options. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Luna
Black cat
1 Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

discomfort

My cat has an umbilical hernia. It was suppose to get fixed when she got spayed but the procedure didn't take place. My cat got fixed around 8.5 months of age, she's now a year old. She's been acting strange like she doesn't want anyone near her belly or that entire area in particular and I have this feeling that it is causing her discomfort rather than pain as of right now but I'm not sure. Is there something I should do or will I have to go to the vet to get another surgery done?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3317 Recommendations
Some cats live their whole lives without any issues from their hernias, whilst others may have discomfort or worse from theirs; I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian immediately for an examination before it possibly becomes an emergency, the surgery is quite simple and routine to correct an umbilical hernia and at her age there is little to be concerned about regarding anaesthesia. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bodie
Siamese
8 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

When is it safe to let her play??

My seal point Siamese kitten had a hernia repaired at 5 months old. 2 months later it reappeared and had to be done again. One week after surgery her belly was very swollen, after a scan she again needed surgery. She's been caged for 3 weeks 2 days

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1607 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without examining Bodie, I can't comment on what might be going on, or what happened after her surgery. It isn't normal to have a hernia repaired 3 times, so it would be best to discuss what might be going on with your veterinarian, to get a better idea as to what might be happening, and how to treat the problem so that she doesn't have ongoing problems.

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