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What is Upper Respiratory Infection?

These infections are also referred to as Feline Infectious Respiratory Disease, or Feline Upper Respiratory Disease Complex (URD) in the veterinary community. The infections vary in severity and have the potential to become life threatening.

Upper respiratory infections are extremely common ailments among cats. Most often the presence of an upper respiratory infection is seen by ocular, nasal, throat and lung irritation and discharge. These infections are spread from contact with other infected cats, and are especially rampant in areas where large groups of cats interact with each other. Kittens, unvaccinated cats, elderly cats and cats with immune deficiencies are the most susceptible to upper respiratory infections.

Upper Respiratory Infection Average Cost

From 592 quotes ranging from $200 - $1,000

Average Cost

$500

Symptoms of Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats

While there are different forms of upper respiratory infections, they share similar symptoms. They are as follows:

  • Nasal discharge (can be containing pus or be clear)
  • Ocular discharge
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Conjunctivitis (inflamed eyelids)
  • Fever
  • Depression
  • Discomfort
  • Lethargy
  • Blepharospasms (squinting)

Your cat may exhibit many or few of these symptoms. Cases change in severity from cat to cat.

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Causes of Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats

Upper respiratory infections are mainly caused by viral infections, however, in rare cases bacterial infections may be responsible. 

Feline Herpesvirus (FHV) 

A more severe form of virus that remains in the cat’s body for the rest of its life. Eye infections are commonly seen with this virus, along with coughing, sneezing, loss of appetite, pharyngitis (sore throat) and inflamed trachea. The virus will manifest itself whenever the cat experiences a time of stress thereafter in its life, with the cat being potentially contagious forever.

Feline Calicivirus (FCV) 

Less severe symptoms are experienced with this virus although more mouth ulceration may be present. There is also an increased risk of developing pneumonia with this virus. The cat may become a carrier once recovered, and could then be contagious whenever shedding the virus.

Bordetella Bronchiseptica 

A bacterial infection that may cause upper respiratory problems in cats. Generally associated with fever, sneezing, swollen lymph nodes and lung complications.

Chlamydophila Felis 

A bacterial infection often associated with eye infections and mild sneezing.

Mycoplasma 

A bacterial infection with symptoms of ocular discharge and eye swelling. 

Feline Reovirus 

A viral infection of the intestines that can sometimes mimic symptoms of a respiratory infection.

Pasteurella 

A bacterial infection that is often transmitted via animal bites. 

All of the aforementioned infections become rampant in situations where many cats are in contact with each other. Because of this, animal shelters, feral cat colonies, and any other large group of cats are at the highest risk of housing viral or bacterial infection epidemics. These upper respiratory infections can be spread from cats hissing, spitting, grooming or even sleeping near each other. Sharing food dishes or litter boxes can also spread infection.

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Diagnosis of Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats

Your vet will likely examine the cat and take note of all specific symptoms your cat is experiencing to rule out other possibilities. The vet will match your cat's symptoms to characteristic clinical signs associated with each type of upper respiratory infection to diagnose the animal. 

At this point, if your vet is still unsure of the type of infection at hand, or if the cat is responding very poorly to the infection, a PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) test will be administered. A swab from the mouth, eye or throat is collected and then sent to a lab for the test to be run. 

Further tests may be run if FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) or FeLV (Feline Leukemia Virus) is suspected. If pneumonia has developed, a transtracheal wash may be done to collect lung samples. If the condition has become chronic, further tests may be needed including blood tests, chest and skull X-rays, and culture tests of abnormal discharge.

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Treatment of Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats

There is no cure for viral infections, so treatment is symptomatic. Your vet will combine some or all of these methods depending on the symptoms your cat is experiencing, and the severity of the infection. 

Antibiotics 

If your cat has developed any secondary infections due to the virus, antibiotics will be prescribed to stop the infections from progressing. 

Steam Inhalation 

To restore some function to the nose, and to entice eating through aromas, a cat may be subjected to steam to loosen or liquify nasal discharge.

Injectable Interferons 

If the virus is caught early on, injecting these proteins may help fight the infection before it fully develops in your cat.

Topical Antiviral Agents 

These agents are applied locally as an ointment or cream to treat the infection. Often, trifluridine, idoxuridine or cidofovir will be prescribed.

Ophthalmic Ointment 

This ointment is used to treat eye infections and irritants affecting the cat.   

Appetite Stimulants

 

If the cat still refuses to eat after wet food or aromatic food in oil have been given, an appetite stimulant will be given to help prevent the cat from developing anorexia.

Feeding Tube

If weight loss becomes too severe and the cat is not responding to food, a feeding tube may be administered to ensure the cat is receiving nutrients and fluids. 

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Recovery of Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats

A virus will usually run its course in 1-4 weeks. If it persists longer, another vet appointment may be necessary. To prevent the infection from spreading to other cats, all items the cat has been in contact with should be sanitized. Bleach, accelerated hydrogen peroxide, or trifectant (potassium peroxymonosulfate) are excellent agents for killing the viral or bacterial remains. Fresh air should be ventilated into the area to remove any infected aerosol content. Keep the cat quarantined for some weeks after symptoms have disappeared, and vaccinate any other cats in the home in the meantime. 

Reduce any possible stress your cat may experience. Especially with FHV, cats are prone to flare ups whenever experiencing stress. Diet change may be needed in cases of symptom recurrence, along with additional veterinary oversight to ensure FIV or FeLV have not developed.

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Upper Respiratory Infection Average Cost

From 592 quotes ranging from $200 - $1,000

Average Cost

$500

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Upper Respiratory Infection Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

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Izzy

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DOMESTIC

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12 Years

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Serious severity

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0 found helpful

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Sneezing

Have had female cat for 7 years. Was stray that I adopted. Was told at time she could be anywhere from 3-7 years old. So that would make her 10-14. She had gingivitis and flea allergy from beginning. Developed occasional sneezing and bad breath early on. Had non-anesthesia dental cleaning several times that helped both. Recently sneezing increased and she has yellowish pus coming out of one nostril. Her appetite is so-so because I don't think she can smell. Antibiotics have helped previously for sneezing and bad breath. Vet who has seen her a couple of times thinks she might have mass in nose because of her age and nasal problems. Bleeding has occurred recently due to excessive sneezing. I fear nasal cancer but also question likelihood of worsening dental problems. One canine tooth became loose not long ago and fell out. Don't know if root came out too. What diagnostics would be most important? I have limited funds, and not sure I would treat a cancer diagnosis.

Sept. 18, 2018

Izzy's Owner

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Sherbet

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domestic short hair

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1 Year

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Fair severity

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0 found helpful

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Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Clingy
Sleepiness

My cat started sneezing today and hasn't wanted to go out for the last couple of days and has been taking a lot of naps. He is always wanting to be right next to me when usually he is a very independent he has also started snoring today along with the sneezing I can't really afford the vet right now because I just lost my job so I would really like to know what I'm getting into before I make an appointment.

Sept. 15, 2018

Sherbet's Owner

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Kiddo

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Tobi

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15 Years

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Moderate severity

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1 found helpful

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Poor Appetite
Tired

My cat when she breath sound like when my husband snore!! I took her 5 times to diferent vets in less than 2 weeks they gave two antibiotics shots and Neomycin and Polymyxin...she Lost her appetite..However I am feeding her with a serine is been 10 days with the same problem ...I don't know what to do anymore .

July 15, 2018

Kiddo's Owner

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3320 Recommendations

There are various causes for noisy breathing which may be due to changes in the airway (narrowing, laryngeal disorders etc…), infections, foreign objects, heart failure among other causes; without auscultating her chest and doing a thorough examination I cannot determine if there is an infection or another cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 16, 2018

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Tosha

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Regular house cat

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5 Years

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Serious severity

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0 found helpful

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Open Mouth Breathing

I have very big problem with my cat. For quite a few months she keeps breathing on her mouth and I see that her condition is worsening (before it used to happen sometimes, but now it came to the point where she is breathing like that while day). The problem is that even though she is an indoors cat, she is very wild and not very friendly, she has been like that since we got her. It's impossible to take her to the vet. There was one vet who was willing to visit us and he said that it's most likely URI. What's strange for me are the symptoms, because she seems to have only open mouth breathing symptom and nothing else that goes with URI. She eats well, she drinks water, she was never really sociable so it's hard to tell, she sometimes comes to cuddle, it's only that breathing that's the problem. Do you have any, any advice to give me? I don't know what to do anymore, I don't sleep for months, trying to figure out how to help her.

July 9, 2018

Tosha's Owner

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3320 Recommendations

Without examining Tosha I cannot say for certain what the specific cause of the open mouthed breathing is, my main concern would be heart disease or infection; however other conditions including nasal cavity obstruction among others would also lead to open mouth breathing. A thorough examination is really needed, but I do appreciate the problems you have regarding getting her seen; I cannot really think of anything which may help at this time without more information. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 10, 2018

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Gregory

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Domestic shorthair

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4 Years

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Mild severity

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Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Sneezing
Eye Discharge

We've been told our cat Greg has an upper respiratory virus, and I'd like to know what it's called. The only symptoms I've noticed: -He often will get eye goop in the corner of his eye, though I think that bothers us more than it bothers him. -He will occasionally get little sneezing fits, though not often. If you could tell us the name of this virus, if you know it, that would be great! We know it can't be cured, we just want to know what it's called.

June 26, 2018

Gregory's Owner

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3320 Recommendations

The two most common upper respiratory tract viral infections are feline herpesvirus and feline calicivirus, they both have similar symptoms so it can be difficult to distinguish between the two. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/cat-owners/lung-and-airway-disorders-of-cats/feline-respiratory-disease-complex-feline-herpesviral-rhinotracheitis,-feline-calicivirus

June 27, 2018

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Cristal

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sem raça

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1 Year

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Serious severity

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0 found helpful

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Sneeze
Sneez

My cat had rhinotracheitis for the second time in early May, we treated and got better ... then it started with an ugly May 27 cough, similar to hairball, but it wasn't. She coughed several times. We treated with corticosteroids, syrup and antibiotic, but it did not improve. Then it began to sneeze and release phlegm through its nose, a thick, hard-to-get-off phlegm that sneezes more than 20 times in a row. We treated again with corticosteroids, syrup and antibiotics, but without improvement. I also inhale with serum daily ... She gets a very stuffy nose and until she sneezes and all the yellow phlegm comes out, she doesn't get better, we already treat her with amoxicillin, doxycycline, marbofloxacil, prednisolone, acetylsistein syrup. I put serum in her nose every day and inhale it. I don't know what to do for her anymore, it's very phlegm and never seems to end. She is using seretide to control bronchitis. I have 6 other cats that live together with her and none have symptoms, all are fine. I have a building in our backyard for 10 months, it has no contact with the outside of the house, but dust enters the windows, I believe that is the cause ..

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Bartholomew

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Orange tabby

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4 Years

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Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Fever
Sneezing
Mouth Breathing

My cat Bartholomew starting sneezing a lot yesterday then recently has started mainly breathing through his mouth mostly. He has a fever and so far seems to still be able to eat and drink. There appears no immediate blockage or seepage coming from the nose. As far as I can tell his mucus from his sneezes seems clear. I do have other cats and I am worried if he's contagious though so far haven't seen any signs in the others. Any immediate treatment options?

dog-name-icon

Bartholomew

dog-breed-icon

Orange tabby

dog-age-icon

4 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Fever
Sneezing
Mouth Breathing

My cat Bartholomew starting sneezing a lot the other day then recently has started mainly breathing through his mouth mostly. He has a fever and so far seems to still be able to eat and drink. There appears no immediate blockage or seepage coming from the nose. As far as I can tell his mucus from his sneezes seems clear. I do have other cats and I am worried if he's contagious though so far haven't seen any signs in the others. Any immediate treatment options?

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Jessie

dog-breed-icon

American Short Hair/Tabby

dog-age-icon

13 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Sneezing
Runny Eye
Unkempt Look

13 yr old male cat..has been sneezing, at times hard enough that clear mucous cones from his nose, one eye is runny, he has an unkempt appearance and has lost weight. We thought originally that was from being out more in order to avoid the 7month old kitten. The sneezing and mucous has been happening about 7 days or so, the weight loss started before then. He is an indoor/outdoor cat. He is vaccinated. Also has Iris melanosis in one eye that we are watching. I just started giving him OTC lysine . The kitten shows no sign of anything as of yet. What is your advice?

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Mother cats are Oreo, Rosa , Artimis. kittens are Tiny, Ziggy, Rosy,Pirate, Alec ,Max, Luke,Lily , Annabell, Lucy, Nuka, Apple, Luna, Tay

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bicolor

dog-age-icon

8 Weeks

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Serious severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Weakness
Sneezing
Eye And Nose Discharge

I have about 14 kittens in total from three different mothers. 2 mother cats had 6 kittens each and the other had 2 , the one with two one died . I also found one outside in the hot sun and took him in . They where all born on different days. one of the mothers and her 6 kittens all have eye and nose discharge and one of them is very weak and wont eat from her mother but she does walk around. What should i do?

Upper Respiratory Infection Average Cost

From 592 quotes ranging from $200 - $1,000

Average Cost

$500

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