Bladder Stones Average Cost

From 174 quotes ranging from $400 - 2,500

Average Cost

$1,200

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What are Bladder Stones?

Bladder stones are a result of crystals that form from minerals in the urine. The crystals will form when there is a high salt concentration in the urine as well as a favourable pH (hydrogen ion concentration) level to facilitate crystallisation. If there is an excessive amount of crystal formation, these will then join and form calculi (stones). These stones can accumulate in the bladder causing discomfort and irritation. Stones can also become stuck in the urethra (the duct that carries urine out of the body) and cause an obstruction of urine flow. An obstruction is considered a veterinary emergency.

If your dog is encountering painful urination, you should act quickly. This situation can be life threatening and may be due to a number of issues, including bladder stones (medically recognised as urinary calculi). If your dog has urolithiasis, they may have blood in their urine and will urine quite frequently, with only a small amount each time.

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Symptoms of Bladder Stones in Dogs

The symptoms present depend on where in the urinary tract the stones have accumulated. Symptoms of bladder stones include:

  • Straining to urinate
  • Blood in urine
  • Foul smell of the urine
  • Increased frequency of urination
  • Producing only small amounts of urine
  • Incontinence or dribbling of urine
  • Abdominal discomfort

If the stones have progressed from the bladder and into the urethra, causing an obstruction, dogs may display the following additional symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy (lack of energy)
Types

There are several different types or varieties of urinary stones that will form dependent on their mineral composition. The bladder stones most commonly found in dogs accumulate from the following mineral and chemical compositions:

  • Struvite
  • Calcium Oxalate
  • Urate
  • Cystine
  • Silicate

Causes of Bladder Stones in Dogs

The definitive cause of bladder stone formation is not fully known. However, there are several factors that contribute to the formation of stones.

  • Prevalence of a urinary tract infection
  • Inflammation of the urinary bladder lining
  • High dietary intake of certain minerals and proteins
  • Reduced water intake
  • Large amount of salts in the urine
  • Optimal pH levels in the urine for stone formation
  • Breed predispositions

Diagnosis of Bladder Stones in Dogs

Diagnosis of canine bladder stones is suspected from the above clinical symptoms. In order to form a definitive diagnosis, the veterinarian may perform several tests including urinalysis, radiography, and ultrasound.

Urinalysis involves a complete analysis of a urine sample. It features a dipstick test, a measure of urine specific gravity, and examination of the urine sediment under a microscope. The dipstick test measures values such as pH, protein content, glucose values, ketones, and traces of blood. The microscopic examination allows the veterinarian to look for the presence of red and white blood cells, epithelial cells, casts, bacteria, and most important, the crystals associated with bladder stones.

Radiographs are performed to determine the location and number of stones within the bladder or distal urinary tract. Many stones are radiopaque meaning that they will show up on the x-rays. Otherwise, a contrast agent can be introduced into the bladder to assist with visualisation. It is especially important to analyse the number and size of bladder stones in case a surgical removal of the stones is necessary.

Ultrasound is another tool that a veterinarian will use to visualise the stones; it is usually used to look for stones that do not show up on a plain x-ray. Ultrasound helps to determine the number of stones present, size, and location.

Treatment of Bladder Stones in Dogs

Once canine bladder stones have been diagnosed, treatment options include dietary management and medical dissolution, urohydropropulsion, surgical removal, and laser lithotripsy. The treatment choice will depend on type and size of bladder stones present.

Dietary management and medical dissolution can be effective depending on the types of stones identified and the likelihood of an obstruction due to size. Struvite is the most common composition of bladder stones in dogs and usually responds well to the dietary and medical treatment approach. The dog is fed a prescription veterinary diet that is specifically formulated to dissolve the crystals along with concurrent medications such as antibiotics to treat urinary infections. The patient will require a repeat urinalysis after two weeks to check that the crystals have dissolved adequately. After treatment, dogs are often switched to an ongoing preventive urinary diet.

Urohydropropulsion is a technique used to expel smaller stones from the bladder as well as dislodge stones stuck in the urethra. Urohydropropulsion involves placing a urinary catheter usually under sedation and flushing the bladder with sterile saline. The bladder is then compressed through palpation of the abdomen expelling the saline along with the smaller stones present.

Surgical removal is necessary with stones that do not respond to dietary and medical management due to their mineral composition and stones that are too big to pass through the urinary tract by urohydropropulsion. The surgical procedure performed is known as a cystotomy and there can be an anaesthetic risk, especially in older or compromised patients. Following surgery, preventative dietary adjustments should be made to prevent the reoccurrence of stones.

Laser lithotripsy is a technique that is currently only available in specialist veterinary centres. The laser is guided into the urinary tract with endoscopic equipment and breaks up the stones within the bladder so that they can be passed naturally. The procedure is less invasive compared to surgery and has a faster recovery time for the patient.

The best treatment method will be discussed by the veterinarian after a complete urinalysis and examination to determine the type of stones present.

Recovery of Bladder Stones in Dogs

Following treatment of canine bladder stones, a repeat urinalysis is performed several weeks later to check for reoccurrence of crystal formation. Once the stones are dissolved or removed from the bladder and the underlying bacterial infection is treated, the condition has a good prognosis.

Dietary dissolution and medical management is a less invasive approach but often takes a longer time to dissolve the crystals. Recovery from a cystotomy surgery is relatively quick, with the dog usually able to go home the following day. The surgical incision will take on average two weeks to fully heal and will need to be rechecked, which is usually when the repeat urinary sample is examined.

Dogs will often be placed on a urinary prescription diet on an ongoing basis. Such diets are specifically formulated to prevent future stone formation. Additionally, water consumption should be increased to help keep the urine diluted. The most common way to increase water consumption in dogs is to increase feeding of canned food as opposed to a sole dry food diet.

Following recovery, ongoing management is crucial to prevent the formation of bladder stones from reoccurring.

Cost of Bladder Stones in Dogs

Treatment cost for bladder stones will depend on the optimal method for their removal.

If dietary and medical management is indicated, this will involve the purchase of a prescription diet and concurrent medications. A case of 12 Hill’s Prescription Diet S/D Urinary Care canned dog food is on average between $35 - $55. Medication costs will depend on what is prescribed by the veterinarian and can be between $30 - $85 for the duration of treatment.

Urohydropropulsion expenses involve sedation, urinary catheterisation, and irrigating fluids. Costs will vary depending on what drugs are used for sedation and the relative time it takes to perform the procedure. Urohydropropulsion including sedation can cost between $325 - $750.

Surgical expenses need to cover anaesthetic costs, IV fluids throughout surgery, surgical equipment, the surgeons time and expertise for the procedure, hospitalisation during recovery, postoperative medications, and additional analysis of stones and urine. The cost for a cystotomy can start at $1,300 for smaller breeds and increase to $2,200 for larger breeds as they require a bigger dose of induction drugs, fluids, gas anaesthetic, and use more surgical material.

Laser lithotripsy is considered a specialist procedure and is only performed at certain facilities. The cost is approximately $800 - $1,200 for the procedure, not including sedation or anaesthetics. The additional expenses for sedation or anaesthesia are dependent on the protocol used and can be between $500 - $1000.

Bladder Stones Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Zeus
Dashound
11 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Painful Urination
Bleeding

I have a small dashound dog his 11mk this amd he bleeds st the end of the pee and he had some stones this morning small ones come out of his penis as he peed his in pain and I have no money for the cost of this procedure please cam u tell me what I should do to he,p my dog any natural remedies

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1079 Recommendations
There are no natural remedies for bladder stones and urinary tract infections, unfortunately. Zeus needs medical care, and possibly surgery. Most clinics do offer CareCredit to cover unexpected expenses, which might help. I am sorry that that is happening, and I hope that he is okay.

Hi there. I’m sorry your dog is in pain. Most vets accept Care Credit as payment. They usually don’t charge interest if you pay off in a year. Another option is to ask your vet for a monthly payback option instead of paying upfront. Many of the county vets have this option. If you can visualize the stones, then the condition is really bad. I would start making calls and find someone to work with you as soon as possible. Good luck to you and your pup

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Kiki
Bichon Frise
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

urine dripping

My 12 year old Bichon has bladder stones struvire stones,,she is urinany very well...drinking a lot of water...I am concern about her diet. I am cooking for her. What should I not feed her? and How do I get the right ph for her?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
Whilst many pet owners want to cook food for their pets, it is best to use a commercially available diet like Royal Canin Urinary SO to help manage the struvite stones; other urinary diets are available from other manufacturers. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.royalcanin.com/products/vet/urinary-health www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Hedy Lamar
Bichon Frise
4 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine

My four year old Bichon Frise has just been diagnosed with a bladder stone. I took her to the Vet a couple of weeks ago after she started urinating inappropriately and passing blood in her urine. She was placed on an antibiotic which seemed to make her feel dramatically better near the end of the course of treatment. (She started eating better, playing with our puppy and acting more like her old self.) However, yesterday she urinated on the snow and it was bloody again. So today I took her back to the Vet and an X-ray showed she has a bladder stone. The Vet prescribed Hill's CD food, gave her another course of antibiotics and wants to see her again in a month to do another X-ray and see if the stones have dissolved or if surgery is needed. I have several questions. 1) Is this typical treatment for bladder stones? and 2) which type of stones can be dissolved by a prescription diet and which types require a surgical procedure? 3) is there a way to tell what type of stone(s) she has other than analyzing it after surgical removal? And finally, 4) Is it unusual for a dog this young to have bladder stone? Thanks you for your assistance.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
If bladder stones are small and not likely to cause an obstruction, we may try a conservative approach to treatment which includes dietary management to change urinary pH. Calcium oxalate stones cannot be dissolved and would need to be removed surgically; struvite stones however are the most common stones found in dogs and may be dissolved with diet and supplements in some cases. The type of stone may be determined by urinalysis to look for microscopic urinary crystals which would determine the type of stone present. Hedy Lamar is not too young for urinary stone formation, especially when associated with a urinary tract infection. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Sassy
Terrier mix
9 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

After peeing there is blood drips
Red blood after urination

Medication Used

Phenylprop
Amoxi tabs

My female dog had bladder stone removal surgery 3 weeks ago. She was fine until this morning. There was blood after she peed again. She is on the rx diet and antibiotics. Should this be happening this long after? Should i be worried?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1079 Recommendations
It might be a good idea to have a recheck urinalysis and x-ray for Sassy since she had problems so recently. It may be nothing to worry about, but it would be best to follow up with your veterinarian to make sure that she isn't having any further problems.

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Rocky
West highland terrier
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Bladder stone

My 12 year old Westy quit eating 4 days ago. My vet checked him out and took an exray and found he had a bladder stone. He was given pain meds, anti- inflammatory and antibiotics. He will not eat or drink. I did get him to drink a small amount of broth last evening. He did urinate good this morning. We went back to the vet yesterday and they gave him a shot for upset gastro and probiotics. I dissolved them in a syringe with some water. His urine test came back with no bacteria. He underwent a dental cleaning a month ago with clindamiacin treatment. Could the the antibiotics be causing all the upset? He was eating and drinking and his spunky self till 4 days ago. Any recommendations? Our vet says the bladder stone will need surgically removed since it is large, but can't do anything till his gastro issues calm down. Should I continue the probiotics or just give him a few days? He was checked for dehydration yesterday and he was not.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
There are a few different causes for a loss of appetite, it seems that the bladder stone is just an unrelated finding; loss of appetite may be caused by a variety of different causes which may include infection, parasites, foreign objects (would normally be seen on x-ray), liver disease, kidney disease among other conditions. Try to encourage Rocky to eat, small regular portions of boiled chicken and rice may help; I don’t think the antibiotic therapy a month ago is related as the interval is too long. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kam
Cavapoo
18 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine

My 18 month old Cavapoo had a couple accidents and started licking himself excessively. I thought he may have a UTI so off to the vet we went. They found no bacteria but did find blood. Started on antibiotics and 2 weeks later we had a urine sample. Positive for more blood and now with bacterial rods in urine. We got set up for an Ultrasound and x ray and found 5 stones in his bladder. Largest is a 1/4 inch. (He is small at 18 lbs). I just dropped him off for a 2 hour bile test. he is scheduled for surgery in a few days unless the bile test is positive. 2 questions...Isn't he kinda young for stones already and is it safe to also be neuter while having surgery for stones?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
There should be no issue neutering and removing bladder stones at the same time, however this is at your Veterinarian’s discretion as they are carrying out the surgery. Bladder stones can occur at any time; whilst normally in older dogs, diet and other factors can predispose a dog to urinary stones at any age. Some stones can be managed with dietary changes and supplements whilst other cannot, see link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Skywalker
Yorkshire Terrier
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Random urination

My 7 year old Yorkie recently had a cystotomy (6 days ago) for removal of calcium stones (he only had 2). He is on Augmentin and Rimadyl as well as on Hills Science Diet c/d. His incision is healing well, he is eating and urinating normally - however I have noticed him squatting here and there and peeing out of the blue as well as no pee coming out. He isn't crying or seem to be in any pain - is this normal nearly a week after surgery? Also, how long does it take for stones to form? And how about feeding him a raw diet instead of the science diet (I do not like the ingredients in this food)

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1079 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It may be normal post-op recovery for him to have some pain, but there may have been a small residual stone that is in his urethra - it would be a good idea to have a follow up with your veterinarian, as they can take an x-ray and make sure that there isn't still a small stone there. Calcium oxalate stones take quite a while to form, and they do need a specific diet to prevent them from recurring - if your veterinarian has recommended the C/D, it would be best to follow that recommendation. I hope that he does well.

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PiPi
Pekingese
10 Years
Serious condition
2 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Involuntary Erect Penis

As much as I appreciate Dr. King's advice, I was hoping for a more detailed advice from another vet. Thanks!

Four days ago, my dog got surgery to remove bladder stones. The vet said the surgery went smoothly and that all the stones were removed. He seemed to have recovered quickly, being able to walk a few hours after the surgery. The blood in urine situation reduced by a lot 3 days post op. However, now I am noticing my dog is having continuous involuntary erections and humping motions, around 1 every 10 mins. The entirety of his back arches. He seems to be in a lot of strain and pain. I have been able to improve the situation by patting his behind when it happens, as if to shock his body out of the situation, and helping him retract his penis with a warm wet towel as he does not seem to be able to do so. He had started to eat around day 2 post op, but now (4 days post op) he does not eat, can't seem to sleep and poo. Is this symptom a possible complication of the surgery? Is there something we can do to the improve the situation? Will the situation improve over time? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1079 Recommendations
Thank you for your response - I wish that I could give you a more detailed response as to that might be happening, but without physically seeing Pipi, it is difficult to assess what might be going on, I apologize. He should be eating well, sleeping comfortably and urinating and defecating normally after the surgery. I'm not sure what type of stones were removed, how many, or if there was a possibility of having a small stone remaining, as that can be a complication if there were multiple small stones. I also don't know what medication he is on. I am concerned that he may be having a urinary blockage due to either a residual stone, or trauma to his urethra, which would require immediate care, and may be treated by catheterization or medication to dilate his urethra, whichever is appropriate. If he is on medication that may have constipated him, he may be suffering from the effects of that and require treatment to relieve that. If he had complications due to the anesthetic, he may be having some systemic problems and require further care. So, it may be simple, and it may not, as you can see. Without knowing what is happening with him, I have a hard time commenting on what can be done to improve his situation, or if it will improve over time, but I do think that he needs to be seen by your veterinarian to try and determine what is happening, if he is okay, and if he needs further treatment. I hope that helps.

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PiPi
Pekingese
10 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Involuntary Erect Penis

Four days ago, my dog got surgery to remove bladder stones. The vet said the surgery went smoothly and that all the stones were removed. He seemed to have recovered quickly, being able to walk a few hours after the surgery. The blood in urine situation reduced by a lot 3 days post op. However, now I am noticing my dog is having continuous involuntary erections and humping motions, around 1 every 10 mins. The entirety of his back arches. He seems to be in a lot of strain and pain. I have been able to improve the situation by patting his behind when it happens, as if to shock his body out of the situation, and helping him retract his penis with a warm wet towel as he does not seem to be able to do so. He had started to eat around day 2 post op, but now (4 days post op) he does not eat, can't seem to sleep and poo.

Is this symptom a possible complication of the surgery?

Is there something we can do to the improve the situation?

Will the situation improve over time?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1079 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It may be that his urethra is irritated from the surgery or stones, or there may have been a small stone that is still causing problems. Whether he is in pain, or is having problems, he should be seen by your veterinarian for a follow up, as that isn't totally normal behavior. Your veterinarian will be able to assess him, see what might be causing these signs, and treat him appropriately. I hope that everything goes well for Pipi.

Is this symptom a possible complication of the surgery?

Is there something we can do to the improve the situation?

Will the situation improve over time?

I was hoping to get these questions answered, which is why I posted again.

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PiPi
Pekingese
10 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Cant Poo
Seems to be strained
Not sleeping
Involuntary Erections
lack of appetite

Four days ago, my dog got surgery to remove bladder stones. The vet said the surgery went smoothly and that all the stones were removed. He seemed to have recovered quickly, being able to walk a few hours after the surgery. The blood in urine situation reduced by a lot 3 days post op. However, now I am noticing my dog is having continuous involuntary erections and humping motions, around 1 every 10 mins. The entirety of his back arches. He seems to be in a lot of strain and pain. I have been able to improve the situation by patting his behind when it happens, as if to shock his body out of the situation, and helping him retract his penis with a warm wet towel as he does not seem to be able to do so. He had started to eat around day 2 post op, but now (4 days post op) he does not eat, can't seem to sleep and poo. Is this symptom a possible complication of the surgery? Is there something we can do to the improve the situation? Will the situation improve over time? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1079 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. It may be that his urethra is irritated from the surgery or stones, or there may have been a small stone that is still causing problems. Whether he is in pain, or is having problems, he should be seen by your veterinarian for a follow up, as that isn't totally normal behavior. Your veterinarian will be able to assess him, see what might be causing these signs, and treat him appropriately. I hope that everything goes well for Pipi.

How serious is this issue? And could it have been due to complications from the surgery?

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Fargo
Shih-Tzu/Yorkshire Terrier
6 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

inappropriate urination
Bladder stones
Blood In Urine

Medication Used

Royal Canin u/d

A couple of years ago my 6 1/2 year old shih tzu/yorkie mix was diagnosed with bladder stones. He's had surgery once, but continues to make stones. There has not been a period of time (except right after surgery) for the past two years where he has been without stones. We monitor them every couple of months with x-rays, and look like we're gearing up for another surgery. We have tried numerous different prescription diets and nothing seems to help. He just keeps producing them. My question is two-fold: Is this just his life now? Will he just always have and keep making stones? Is that a common occurrence? And secondly, at what point does putting him through multiple surgeries become excessive and negatively impact both his quality of life and the health of his bladder in general?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
Some dogs will just continue to produce urinary stones, there are management options and for some types of urinary stones there are supplements which may be used to help prevent and to dissolve some stones. Regular surgery is not a viable long term solution, I would recommend consulting with an Internal Medicine Specialist to review Fargo’s case and to see if a more appropriate long term plan can be made. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Tommy
Lhasa Apso
22 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Lack Of Energy,
Painful Urination
Not Moving

About a week ago we woke up to our dogs weak legs. Stumbling and falling, the condition worsened the next day when he wasn't able to walk anymore.
Taking him to the vet, we were told that his spine is fine. We have checked his body for ticks and couldn't find anything.
An ultrasound revealed that he seemed to have a bladder infection and bladder stones. Now the vet is been giving him daily shots of medicine and yesterday he peed for the first time without noticable pain. But since the second day, he still hasn't been able to stand on his feet and yesterday I noticed he is not wiggling his tail too. Could this lack of energy be due to his infection and stones, which the vet tells us. Or could there be other reasons to this?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
Urinary stones can be very painful, it is possible that Tommy is restricting his back end movement due to pain felt from his urinary system; if other causes of hind leg weakness has been ruled out already then it is possible the cause is down to the pain caused by the urinary stones. It is important to follow your Veterinarian’s instructions on diet and hydration; depending on the type of stones some supplements may help too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Smoki
Schnoodle
8 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Urinate
Frequent Urination
Panting
Shaking

My dog Smoki had surgery to remove bladder stones 3 weeks ago. She was put on antibiotics and a few other medications, as well as a prescription dog food. Tonight, she showed the same symptoms, and we are able to feel more stones by touching her abdomen. What causes them to come back so quickly and what can I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations
With appropriate medical management and dietary changes, stones shouldn’t be forming (at least not at a fast or noticeable rate); many times urinary stones may be precipitated by urinary tract infections, so control of infection may also help against the stones. Depending on the specific type of urinary stone, some dietary supplements are available (see link below) and can help to dissolve and prevent urinary stones in combination to diet and medical management. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Einstein
Maltese
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Straining to urinate

Medication Used

Convenia
meloxicam 1.5 mg

My dog underwent bladder stone surgery 2 weeks ago. He's able to get a good stream of urine now but the frequency and straining to go are still there and when he doesn't strain sometimes there a couple of drops if that. He received a shot of convenía and he got meloxicam prescribed. Today he had a urinalysis done and the results came back positive for bacteria, crystals, and abnormal ascorbic acid. What could be the cause of this? Could it be an underlying infection which also could've cause the stones? And what would be proper treatment?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

If bacteria have been detected during urinalysis a course of antibiotics are usually required; infections can help with the formation of stones so treatment is best. Also, depending on the type of crystals and stones there may be dietary changes or supplements which can dissolve and prevent some types of stones (I’ve provided a reputable link below). Inflammation from the previous stones may still cause some discomfort whilst urinating but the meloxicam should take care of that. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Jessie
toy poodle
11 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

active level dowm
does not show if in pain only blood in urine not a

I have an 11 year old toy poodle weight about 8-9 lbs recently found blood in urine had test at vet was told she has bladder stones and some calcifation in one kidney vet said other kidney looked good. wants to do surgery on bladder stones next week and says will need special diet plus meds for kidney. dog has been on special diet food for weight for some time- food from vet office. am concered for her due to age- not sure of normal life span for poodles. has warts and allergies and some vision problems. she does drink lots of water already but on walks will try to urinate often. I'm not sure about food for her any more. would we be better to cook meat for her with veggies or what is right dog food. dont know how to help her. thank you for helping

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Poodles live on average for 12-14 years (depending on the literature) although many will exceed this. Dietary management is important and there are many suitable diets out there, also depending on the type of the stone there may be supplements to change the pH of the urine and to prevent recurrence. Homemade diets are suitable for the short term, but a commercial complete diet is better for the long term. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bubba
Terrier mix
8 Years
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Bladder stones
Incontinence

Medication Used

Amocicillin
Carprofen

My terrier mix who is 8 years old had a cystotomy (13 stones where removed ) 6 days ago and is having some incontinence today it is a few drops here and there after he has gone out and urinates it is nothing close to the incontinence he had prior to surgery, is this incontinence normal after stone removal?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Some incontinence may occur after bladder stone removal, but you should see a general improvement over time. If after a few more days there is no improvement visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chappie
Schnoodle
11
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

No appetite
Dripping of blood when urinating
Frequent urinating, even through the night

My dog has had 3 bladder stones removed and 25 teeth. He is 11 years old. When he urninates blood is still visible and he urinates frequently (no bladder control). He has also had no appetite. The operation was performed Monday late afternoon and it is now Sunday morning. He seems to still be in good spiritis. I have been force feeding him. I would like to know are all these symptoms normal. After reading about the pain killer they gave, I have stopped giving it to him as I read it can cause non interest in food. I am extremely dissapointed in my VET as it seems if he has complications, it will be charged once again to me.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Chappie should have his appetite back after a week, sometimes feeding boiled chicken and rice is more appetising than regular food; just mush it up for him and see if it helps. The urinary bleeding should have subsided by now but may take a little longer to resolve depending on Chappie’s overall health. Complications may occur after any surgery; the older the dog the higher the risk of complications and side effects do occur from medications but their use is balanced between risk (side effects) and reward (benefits) of use. If the problem continues, you should really discuss this with your Veterinarian (despite your disappointment) as Chappie is under their duty of care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for your advice. It is reassuring that this is normal in an older dog. Should I not see an improvement by tomorrow, I will take him back.

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Coal
German Shorthaired Pointer
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Bloating post surgery
Post surgery complications

Our 7/8 year old German short haired pointer one day all of the sudden was frequently wanting to go to the bathroom and not really urinating. We took him to the vet the same day. He had bladder stone removal surgery on Sunday at midnight. We picked him up Sunday at 9 pm and they said he was doing well. We brought him home and he seemed to be doing fine. However, we started to notice increased bloating. The vet had us bring him back today. They said his 1/3 of the sutures on his bladder had come apart and his urine was leaking into his abdomen..? They did another surgery on him to correct it today. The vets response following surgery was that, "it went as well as it could with what we had." He said if this does not work then we will be in a more dire situation. They said they would need to keep him for a couple days and wouldn't know anything for a couple days until we see if he leaks again. This all seems very strange for a surgery for a surgery that is peojected to be simple with easy recovery...We are just not sure how to take this Vets comments. We aren't feeling very optimistic with what he had to say.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Cystotomy is a relatively simple procedure (like a spay) that some Veterinary Boards (I know New Zealand do or did) will use the surgery as a basic test of surgical skills for Veterinarians requiring a License which studied at a school which isn’t accredited by the Local Veterinary Board. Traditionally, suturing of the urinary bladder requires a double layer of suturing; but a study performed found that both a single and double layer of sutures had the same rate of dehiscence leading to the conclusion that a single layer is appropriate; the study found a dehiscence rate of 1.4%, it may be that unfortunately Coal fell in that 1.4%. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.veterinarypracticenews.com/Medicine/What-You-Need-to-Know-about-Bladder-Surgery/

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Piddles
Pekingese
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Frequent Urination

I have a 14 y/o Pekingese who has had bladder stones for several years. They have caused him very little problems till recently when he began urinating frequently in the house. Sometime he urinates a small amount like drops and other times large amounts. My vet recommended surgery but right now I don't have the financial resources to pay for the surgery till later this year. My vet recommended an anti inflammatory medication which is in liquid form and given once daily with food. Could his sudden urinary pattern change and incontinence be due to his bladder stones? We had a UA done and there was no infection present. Also is it possible that a special diet could dissolve the stones after having them for several years? Could the anti-inflammatory medication help with his urinating all over the house? Please Help,
Sincerely,
Frustrated owner of Piddles the pekingese

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Depending on the type of urinary stones, it may be possible to dissolve the stones with a change of diet and the use of some supplements. The anti inflammatory medication would make Piddles more comfortable, but wouldn’t really do anything to stop the urination. The bladder weakness may be due to urinary stones or incontinence due to old age (spinal problems, nerve damage etc…). I’ve put a link below with information relating to protocols for dissolving urinary stones and dietary management (not all stone can be dissolved); you would need to ask your Veterinarian which type of stones Piddles has. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.msdvetmanual.com/urinary-system/noninfectious-diseases-of-the-urinary-system-in-small-animals/urolithiasis-in-small-animals

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Coby
Dachshund
6 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

trying to urinate multiple times in one outing
Blood in Urine

Medication Used

none

Our 6 yr old dachshund recently had surgery to remove the "bad" stones. The vet has recommended a dietary change, and was insistent only one particular brand of food would work. (Hills c/d multicare dry food) Not only did my husband and I find the listed ingredients pretty poor, but we read reviews on many diffferent sites, the majority of which were VERY bad! My husband is returning that food. OUr question is, what is the BEST way/food to treat my lil girl to prevent future stones? Thank you.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Hills, Royal Canin and Purina all have urinary diets which have similar ingredients. The majority of dog food is based on the same ingredients which some people have demonised in forums since they aren’t part of a dog’s natural diet (in the same way cow’s milk isn’t natural for humans to drink, but they conveniently forget that). There are supplements which you can add to Coby’s diet to help dissolve and prevent stones (depending on the type of stone). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Buddy
Terrier chayawa
11 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

discomfort

Medication Used

none

Quite by accident we discovered our 11 year old, mixed terrier has a bladder stone. We recently changed Vets to a new gal who just moved down the way from us. She is very pleasant and has good reviews as to how she handles people and their pets but to let her do surgery on our Buddy is a bit scary. We really have no information what her mortality rate is in surgery further it appears she started her own practice just after completing an internship so is young in her practice. How could we find out if she is properly qualified (other than where she went to school) to do surgeries and just how dangerous is the removal of this stone.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

The decision to allow your new Veterinarian to perform the surgery on Buddy is yours; the surgery isn’t complicated and is almost as simple as neutering. I wouldn’t question the ability of a Veterinarian to perform the surgery; but bear in mind that there are risks to surgery especially with older animals which can be outside of your Veterinarian’s control which is why preanaesthetic blood tests should be carried out prior to surgery. Whether or not she is suitably qualified shouldn’t be in question if she has graduated from an AVMA accredited Veterinary School (or passed the ECFVG), passed the NAVLE and is licensed in your state. As I mentioned previously, the surgery isn’t anything requiring specialist qualifications and is used by some countries licensing boards as a practical test of competency (if they don’t have enough dogs requiring neutering) for Veterinarians seeking a license to practice. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Stormy
Miniature Schnauzer
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Can't urinate without a cathereter

My miniature schnauzer male had bladder stones and I was told his bladder was very angry . Is it humane to let them keep treating it he can't urinate and it's been almost 5 days since surgery please help me he can't urinate without being Catherized is it humane to keep putting him through all of this

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

If there is inflammation of the urethra it maybe that urination is difficult or painful resulting in Stormy not urinating; it can be traumatic to see your loved one having difficulties to urinate but it is important to see it through, five days is a long time but you need to speak with your Veterinarian to see what Stormy’s overall prognosis is. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Teenie
Chihuahua
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Leaking, blood in urine.

My chihuahua has been on a prescription diet for her bowel. She is 13 years old, has loss of hearing and cataracts. Now she has bladder stones and 3 urinary track infections since July 2016. What is the prognosis after surgery. I am trying to make the right decision. She has never drank a lot of water and I have been putting water in her food for quite sometime with a mixture of wet food with the prescription diet. The vet is charging approximately $1200. This does not include the x-rays and office visits and x-rays and medical since July. The bigger factor is her quality of life. I want to make the right decision for her. I had another 14yr old and she had a fatty tumor removed and it grew back. She died 1 1/2 yes later and was miserable. I don't want to be selfish.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

Surgery would be the treatment of choice if you are unable to dissolve the stones; along with surgery, dietary changes may need to be made which needs to take into account her bowel diet too. I understand your concerns about surgery at an old age but quality of life with pain and discomfort from urinary stones and infections will lower Teenie’s quality of life; making the right decision can be difficult, especially if you have had a bad past experience in the past it may cloud your judgement on what is best for Teenie. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Baxter had surgery to remove stone day before yesterday.

So can a belly band be used after surgery to help with discomfort.?

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Sam
Chihuahua
10 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Peeing a lot in the house
Took to vet peeing everywhere

How much is surgery for getting stonesystem out of my dog bladder? Veterans want to charge me 3000. He was peeing everywhere

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2499 Recommendations

The cost for the removal of urinary stones will vary depending on your Veterinarian, your location (New York City will cost more than rural Kansas), pre-anaesthetic blood tests (advised in older patients) and the weight of the patient (overweight animals can be more difficult). Generally $2,000 to $3,000 sounds in the ball park for the surgery. In some cases, dietary changes and medication can help; but this can vary case to case. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a 12 year old long hair Chihuhua that has been urinating inappropriately for the past 6 months. We have spent a great deal of money on testing and specialists who say she has kidney stones, they don't recommend surgery and didn't think diet would work. We tried antibiotics and it helped a little but the behavior continues. She doesn't appear to be in pain but just exhibiting very increased frequency. I've taken her off all commercial dog food and have been making her dog food with brown rice, ground turkey, spinach, squash, beans, peas, kale, etc. She loves it and eats better than she used to but doesn't seem to make a difference. I'm out of ideas!

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