Bone Overgrowth Average Cost

From 57 quotes ranging from $500 - 3,500

Average Cost

$1,200

First Walk is on Us!

✓ GPS tracked walks
✓ Activity reports
✓ On-demand walkers
Book FREE Walk

Jump to Section

What is Bone Overgrowth?

Bone overgrowth in dogs is a painful disease that can occur in rapidly growing dogs of large or giant breeds. This disease is referred to as hypertrophic osteodystrophy, skeletal scurvy, metaphyseal osteopathy, or Moller-Barlow’s disease. It usually exhibits symptoms in the puppy stages or very young years of life and progressively becomes debilitating and painful.

Bone overgrowth in dogs is a painful disease that can occur in rapidly growing dogs of large or giant breeds. This disease is referred to as hypertrophic osteodystrophy, skeletal scurvy, metaphyseal osteopathy, or Moller-Barlow’s disease. It usually exhibits symptoms in the puppy stages or very young years of life and progressively becomes debilitating and painful.

Book First Walk Free!

Symptoms of Bone Overgrowth in Dogs

There are many symptoms, some quite severe, that puppies and dogs can face at the onset and during this disease. Symptoms can begin in very young puppies or younger dogs as they grow rapidly. Symptoms include:

  • Swelling of legs in growth plate areas
  • Lameness
  • Not wanting to exercise
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of appetite
  • Fever, sometimes very high
  • Possible limb deformities

Types

There are several types of dogs that are more prone to getting hypertrophic osteodystrophy. Large and giant breeds that are more at risk for being affected by this are:

  • Great Dane
  • Irish Wolfhound
  • Weimaraner 
  • Irish Setter
  • German Shephard

Causes of Bone Overgrowth in Dogs

Finding the direct cause of this disease, which occurs mostly in very large breeds, is a difficult thing to do for medical professionals. Nothing has been found to be the specific cause, but through much research, many have come to the conclusion that this could be caused by a few sources. 

  • Bacterial infection
  • Possible Vitamin C deficiency
  • High-protein and high-calorie diet
  • Sudden and rapid bone growth
  • Transitioning from puppy food to adult food too early

Diagnosis of Bone Overgrowth in Dogs

If you suspect your dog has hypertrophic osteodystrophy, the veterinarian will want a detailed history of your dog’s health. Once the veterinarian does a complete exam, recognizing the swelling on the growth plates, the veterinarian will perform imaging methods, which may show signs of inflammation in the bone. 

This radiograph imaging on the dog’s limbs will be the main method for diagnosing hypertrophic osteodystrophy. If any other diseases are suspected, the veterinarian will perform the appropriate tests to rule out any other causes.

The doctor may also do bloodwork to assess the blood count; a high white blood count can signify an infection, along with a fever. He may also do other tests, such as a biochemistry profile, electrolyte testing, or urinalysis to get a clearer picture of what is going on in terms of the dog’s health.

Treatment of Bone Overgrowth in Dogs

Treatment of this disease can have many different options, and all of them work together to make your dog as comfortable as he can be. The veterinarian will go by the most up-to-date research of this complex disease. Treatment includes:

Drugs

Anti-inflammatory drugs and painkillers, such as Rimadyl, can be given to your dog to help with the swelling and the pain. Since this disease is likely from an infection, the veterinarian may prescribe an antibiotic. 

Supplements

It is unclear if supplements of specific vitamins will help your dog, and the veterinarian, who is abreast of the most recent research, will let you know if any supplements can help him.

Recovery of Bone Overgrowth in Dogs

When your fur baby is home, you will need to take good care of him and keep him comfortable. The veterinarian will tell you when and how to administer any medications, if needed, and if you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to ask your veterinarian. If the veterinarian has put him on a special diet for some reason, be sure to follow it.

When walking your dog, be sure to use a harness and keep him from jumping and running. All rough play needs to be avoided. When he is not being walked, he should be kept close to you or, if you are not at home, then in a crate or kennel.

Be sure to watch for any symptoms or episodes, and if you see anything out of the ordinary, please contact your veterinarian. Your medical professional will also tell you what to watch for and what to be concerned about.