Demodectic Mange Average Cost

From 54 quotes ranging from $300 - 500

Average Cost

$350

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What is Demodectic Mange?

Many animals have diverse communities of microorganisms inhabiting their skin. This includes helpful bacteria, fungi and yeast, and sometimes microscopic mites. These tiny arthropods feed on dead skin cells and sometimes skin secretions, but usually do no harm as they are kept in check by the immune system. However, Demodectic mange is a condition where the immune system has failed to suppress the populations of mites, which are allowed to colonize the hair follicles in large numbers. Their actions of feeding and defecating irritates the skin and may allow opportunistic bacteria to cause infection. This causes inflammation, scarring and hair loss. Contact a veterinarian if your dog develops hairless patches, even without noticeable itching or discomfort.

Demodectic mange is a condition caused by excessive populations of a normal skin mite, Demodex canis. This mite is part of the normal microscopic community on the skin and is not normally a threat to health. However, when the immune system of an animal becomes compromised, these mites are allowed to invade the hair follicles in much greater numbers, leading to hair loss and skin irritation. It can occur in several different forms affecting both young and old animals.

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Symptoms of Demodectic Mange in Dogs

  • Hairless patches
  • Excessively oily skin
  • Redness or inflammation
  • Swelling of the paws
  • Crusting of the skin.

Causes of Demodectic Mange in Dogs

  • Congenital immune system deficiency
  • Age related decline in immune system
  • Idiopathic mange
  • Drug-induced immune deficiency
Types
  • Juvenile Immunodeficiency
  • Localized Mange
  • Adult Onset Immunodeficiency

Diagnosis of Demodectic Mange in Dogs

Owners who notice their pet developing bald patches, excessive skin oiliness and irritation should see a veterinarian as soon as possible, as the condition is easier to treat if it is caught before symptoms become too severe. Demodectic mange is easily diagnosed with a microscopic examination of either a scraping of the skin, or a few plucked hairs. This will reveal the mites, eggs and larvae. Unfortunately, diagnosing the underlying condition that has allowed the mite population to expand is not so easy.

The first category of demodectic mange is hair loss in small patches most commonly located around the lips, eyes and legs. These patches may exhibit redness and scaling, and usually occur in dogs less than a year old. While this kind of mange may resolve on its own, your veterinarian can provide topical creams to make sure the condition doesn’t spread.

If this condition is allowed to spread, or the dog has an immune deficiency, this can progress to juvenile-onset generalized demodecosis. This condition is often the result of an inherited condition in which the cell-mediated immune system does not work properly to identify and combat foreign invaders. Generalized demodecosis is a severe illness causing hair loss over the entire body along with skin irritation and pustules. Fever and inflammation are often seen with this condition.

In older dogs, a similar condition can occur, but indicates either a medication or underlying condition is compromising the immune system. Cancers such as lymphosarcoma, melanoma can suppress the immune system, along with diseases like Cushing’s and diabetes. Sometimes, this condition is idiopathic, meaning no underlying condition is found, and the reason for the mange is not known.

Treatment of Demodectic Mange in Dogs

Demodectic mange that is not related to an immune deficiency is easily treated with a number of anti-mite creams, or simply left to heal on its own. Trimming the hair around the affected areas if it is extremely thick helps with medication penetration, and benzoyl peroxide shampoo can rapidly correct the condition.

For generalized demodecosis, whole-body treatments with benzoyl peroxide or amitraz may be needed, along with anti-parasitics such as ivermectin. Note that ivermectin should never be given to Collies and Collie crosses, as it is potentially toxic. Any bacterial infections should be treated with an appropriate antibiotic.

Sometimes, anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids can depress the immune system enough to allow the mite population to grow out of control. Use of the above treatments in addition to stopping the anti-inflammatory drugs is usually curative.

Recovery of Demodectic Mange in Dogs

The outlook for dogs with immune disorders is mixed. Dogs with juvenile-onset mange may be susceptible to other diseases that can be fatal, or experience infections leading to sepsis. In general, any dog with a suspected immune deficiency should not be used for breeding. Older dogs experiencing immune deficiency due to cancer will have an outlook dependent on the cancer location and type as well as treatment pursued.

Dogs without immune disorders, or dogs being treated with anti-inflammatories usually experience a complete correction of the disorder upon treatment with topical creams and shampoos along with cessation of any immune-suppressing medications.

Demodectic Mange Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Tatius
Pit bull bully
11 Months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

My dog has bold spots around his legs and on his behind his also getting them on the side of stomach and the chest they get really red when he scratches almost to the point of bleeding and has a lot of dandruff. Would like to know what I can do if been taking him a bath and adding a dip but just don’t seem to make any difference or getting better.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
It may be that the cause isn’t Demodectic mange but something else; allergies, pyoderma, chemical irritation, hormonal conditions among other causes may also cause similar symptoms. Ideally a skin scraping would be a useful diagnostic aid to determine if there are any parasites like Demodex, Scabies etc… Apart from bathing with a medicated shampoo, the addition of systemic antibiotics may help any secondary infection but I would recommend you visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bea
Doberman Pinscher
5 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Itching, redness, bumpy skin

Hi - My doberman puppy is 5 months old and last week we met for a play date with another doberman puppy whos is around 6 months old and was rescued he has demodectic mange and we were told this is not contagious. The next day our puppy came out in itchy hives which developed into a rash on her tummy- the hives on her body seem to have cleared up but she does have lots of little bumps on her face. Our first thought was she had an allergic reaction from playing in the woods eg stinging nettles, but now we are thinking could she have contacted demodectic mange from the puppy? they were rough playing so should we be concerned ? the vet is treating her for an allergic reaction but she is having a skin scrape just to be sure. Thank you

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1604 Recommendations
Demodectic mange is not contagious between puppies, and it seems that Bea is having an allergic reaction more than a contagious disease. I hope that everything goes well for her!

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Diesel
Paisley Terrier
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Loss of hair
Red skin,

Medication Used

none

He is digging at his skin and his hair is falling out

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

There are various possible causes for this level of self harm due to itching which may be due to parasites (mites), pyoderma (either primary or secondary), contact dermatitis, allergies among other causes. I would recommend having a skin scraping done to help determine the underlying cause so that treatment may be directed effectively. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Eva
Poodle
2 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Itching
Redness
Hair Loss

Medication Used

ketoconazole

Hello,

I've been to the vet 3 times already and they didn't find what both of my dogs (breed : toy poodle) had...This is why I come here right now.

So the problem is that both of my dog are scratching and loosing hair in the exact same spot their front right paw (shoulder). The vet did a skin scraping in ordre to see what it was, but it came out negative.
Skin scrapping for : tinea capetis (teigne in french)
Blood test for : Lyme disease and antique related to ticks

Recently, everything's been good and the hair started growing back on certain spots after giving some ketoconazole for like 2-3 months. We stopped the medicine because we saw no direct effect after so much time and miraculously the hair started growing back. Is there a link to do between those two facts...? I don't know. Unfortunately, there's been a new rash and took picture of the progression. I'm pretty curious if anyone had the same problem.

Here's the picture taken 5, 8 and 10th of May : see attached file + last picture is today's progression

Thanks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

Firstly, I didn’t receive any photos; our website doesn’t support pictures. If the hair loss reacted to treatment with ketoconazole, the cause may most likely be fungal in origin; another scraping may be taken and sent for fungal culture to see the most appropriate medication to prescribe, also a skin biopsy could be sent off for histopathology and the Pathologist may be able to identify cells or other abnormalities to give a diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Nu'u
Whippet mix
2years old
Moderate condition
-1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Red skin,

Medication Used

Nexguard

My dog breaks out with what looks like red mange, and I've used benzoyl peroxide shampoo, but it looks worse and her body is feverish, appetite not so good, should I put her on vitamins and if so what kind?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations

In cases of mange, it is always useful to get a skin scraping to confirm the presence of the distinctively shaped parasite. Treatment is long consisting of weekly or fortnightly baths with benzoyl peroxide shampoo followed by the application of an amitraz dip at a dose of 250ppm; amitraz is the only approved treatment for demodicosis in the United States. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you! What is a good immune system for her that you would trust.?

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astro
Pit bull
10-12 months?
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

I rescued a puppy who is part pit bull. The first vet visit they noticed what they thought was mange. They scraped and tested and it was negative. They treated him for fleas and ticks with nextguard and also gave him apoquel The problem got worse and I took him back this morning (about 2 months later) Again tested and negative but they are treating him for mange. With shampoos lotion cephaexine and benadryl and nextguard. I have done a lot of research on pit bulls and skin conditions and I am worried that its an allergy issue and not mange and that it wont work! Help!!!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3314 Recommendations
Sometimes you can scrape for mange but you won't find any and this is probably what your Veterinarian is thinking; without examining Astro I cannot say for sure what the cause is but allergies are a common problem in dogs and food as well as environmental allergens may play a role. You are currently already giving an antihistamine (Benadryl - usually 1mg/lb two to three times per day) which should decrease any itching if the cause is due to allergies. Allergy testing is really the only other way to go for a quick answer. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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