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What is Mushroom Poisoning?

The most common form of documented mushroom poisoning in dogs is toxicity resulting from the Amanita species. It is believed that canines are attracted to members of this species because of their fishy odor. In particular, the amanita phalloides (otherwise known as death cap) are most toxic. It may be hard to confirm if your pet has ingested mushrooms unless you see your dog eat them, or he vomits mushrooms. At the earliest suspicion of ingestion, immediately go to the veterinarian clinic or emergency room. If possible, bring a sample of the mushroom in a paper (not plastic) bag as mushroom identification is helpful to diagnosis.

The ingestion of mushrooms can be highly toxic and a potentially life threatening occurrence for your pet. The accumulation of toxins in your dog’s system can lead to kidney and liver failure, and quite possibly, coma and death. If you suspect your dog has eaten mushrooms, do not wait for symptoms to appear. Take your pet to the veterinarian immediately for early identification of the mushroom type. Identification, and prompt emergency measures to reduce the toxicity levels in your dog’s system are crucial steps towards recovery.

Mushroom Poisoning Average Cost

From 11 quotes ranging from $300 - $6,000

Average Cost

$1,200

Symptoms of Mushroom Poisoning in Dogs

The symptoms of mushroom poisoning in dogs vary depending upon the type of mushroom ingested. As mentioned previously, if you suspect that your dog has eaten a mushroom, do not wait for the symptoms to appear. Usual symptoms are as follows:

  • Lethargy
  • Diarrhea
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting and abdominal pain
  • Weakness and loss of motor control
  • Jaundice
  • Coma and death
Types

The type and severity of mushroom poisoning in dogs will vary depending on the species consumed. Based on the toxins contained and the onset of symptoms, toxicity can range from gastrointestinal upset to the more severe complication of the destruction of liver and kidney cells. The amanita phalloides produce the most grave symptoms and the highest likelihood of mortality.

A dog who has ingested a mushroom of the amanita species can experience dehydration and increased heart rate unbeknownst to the owner, appear fine for a day or two but within 3 to 4 days become ill with severe liver dysfunction and swelling of the brain, among other complications that may lead to death within a week if aggressive treatment is not implemented.

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Causes of Mushroom Poisoning in Dogs

There are several thousand species of mushroom in North America, with less than 100 being of the toxic type. Mushroom intoxications are a challenging area of study as not all toxicity cases are submitted on record and limited toxicology testing is available. Nonetheless, it is imperative to have your dog seen by a veterinarian in order to obtain a diagnosis and treatment. The ingestion of mushrooms causes toxins to be spread throughout your dog’s system, resulting in acute effects such as liver failure leading to coma and death without aggressive veterinary intervention.

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Diagnosis of Mushroom Poisoning in Dogs

Diagnosing the need for the reduction of toxins which have been absorbed in your pet’s system must be done quickly in order to increase your dog’s chances of survival. Historically, records show that mortality from the ingestion of the Amanita species is 50% to 90%, thus indicating the need for early aggressive decontamination therapy before symptoms have progressed.

If you are able to bring a sample of the mushroom to the veterinarian, diagnosis will be much easier. If this is not possible, be prepared to relay the recent health history of your pet. You will be asked to describe the symptoms, and give a time of onset of ill behavior to the best of your knowledge. Your veterinarian may need to obtain a blood sample and urinalysis to determine the toxicity levels present.

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Treatment of Mushroom Poisoning in Dogs

Treatment will depend on the type of mushroom ingested. The most common and most severe type of mushroom poisoning in dogs results from the consumption of the amanita phalloides, leading to acute intoxication.

Treatment will often begin with inducing vomiting in your pet to remove toxins from your pet’s stomach as quickly as possible. Fluid therapy is also included in the treatment, which is done specifically to encourage urination and reduce toxicity in the liver and kidneys. Activated charcoal has been given to by mouth to dogs as a way to neutralize the stomach acids and bind the toxins.

Glucose and gastrointestinal protectants are also administered, along with antibiotics. Blood transfusion may be necessary in severe cases.

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Recovery of Mushroom Poisoning in Dogs

Your dog will spend a few days minimum in the hospital if they have ingested mushrooms of the amanita species because of the need to rehydrate with fluids that will restore the proper amounts of glucose and potassium to the blood. The liver will need to be monitored to verify proper function after reparative therapy. A positive prognosis is possible, particularly if the toxins were eliminated quickly before extensive damage was done. Treatment for mushroom poisoning in dogs is extensive and the therapy must be done over a period of hours and/or days depending on the amount consumed and the species ingested.

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Mushroom Poisoning Average Cost

From 11 quotes ranging from $300 - $6,000

Average Cost

$1,200

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Mushroom Poisoning Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Ask a Vet

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Pitbull

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Seven Months

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Unknown severity

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Vomiting

My dog got into a mushroom in the yard, few moments later he throw a lot of it up if not all of it... drank water and had Some ice cubes and then about 10 minutes later he just threw up again but it was not chunky just liquid/ acidity. Should I be concerned?

Sept. 15, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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Thank you for your question. Some mushrooms can be very toxic, unfortunately, but it sounds like you may have gotten lucky if he vomited most or all of it up right after he ate it. At this point, I don't think there's anything that you need to worry about as far as taking him to the ER. I would watch him very closely over the next 24 hours, however. If he continues to vomit, or seems lethargic or unstable, or is acting strangely in any way, then I would take him in right away. Hopefully, he got it all out of his system and it just upset his stomach a little bit. I hope that all goes well for him.

Sept. 15, 2020

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Labrador Retriever

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7 weeks

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Unknown severity

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Nothing

My puppy had a mushroom in his mouth. I was able to remove it before he swallow.

July 31, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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Thank you for your question. If you were able to take the mushroom out of his mouth before he swallowed it, I suspect he will be okay. If he shows any signs of vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy or loss of appetite, then it would be best to have him seen by a veterinarian, but it seems that he will likely be okay.

July 31, 2020

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Porter

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Beagle Lab Mix

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6 Years

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Moderate severity

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2 found helpful

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Jaundice
Dark Urine
Lethargy

My dog is currently being hospitalized with fluid treatment, steroids and antibiotic. I noticed him looking jaundice on Saturday 8/18 and immediately took him to the ER. They did blood tests and told me his cells are attacking one another and started a first round of fluids and gave me the medications and sent us home and told us to follow up with our normal vet Monday morning 8/20. That morning I took him straight in for more testing. They never sent the testing until today 8/21 leaving us no answers until 8/22. I’ve been calling trying to push them to move faster as he was still jaundice and lethargic. He had a decent appetite until this afternoon and would drink with some coaxing. As I have racked my brain as to what may have caused this my husband said this evening he had noticed some mushrooms in the yard and we are wondering what the possibility is that our dog ingested one prior to my husband mowing. If this is what has happened what are the odds our little guy can pull through this? I’m calling them first thing in the morning with this possible discovery in hopes that it’s not too late.

Aug. 22, 2018

Porter's Owner

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3320 Recommendations

Jaundice and general liver failure may be caused by mushroom poisoning, but it depends on the type of mushrooms; there are many causes of jaundice as jaundice is just a symptom and not a disease itself. Speak with your Veterinarian to see how Porter is doing and notify them of the mushroom possibility. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 22, 2018

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jake

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Golden Retriever

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11 Years

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Mild severity

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1 found helpful

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Mild severity

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Just Tired And Mushy

My golden ate 2 mushrooms growing in mulch about 20 hours ago. Induced vomiting...brought her to ER. They said just watch her. I'm still worried. It seems there is really no difinitive way of knowing if the mushroom was toxic. How long before he shows symptoms of toxicity? He ate fine and pooped fine. A little mushier than usual but it may be because it was a stressful day and night after it happened.

July 30, 2018

jake's Owner

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3320 Recommendations

Thankfully the majority of mushrooms are safe to eat, however there is no guarantee that Jake ate a non-toxic mushroom; the onset of any symptoms would depend on the type of mushroom that was consumed from no symptoms at all for non-toxic species to less than an hour for some others, however some types of mushrooms like the deadly webcap (Cortinarius rubellus) may take weeks for symptoms to present. I would keep a close eye on Jake and follow up with your Veterinarian if you have any concerns. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 31, 2018

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Sparky

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Labrador Retriever

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7 Years

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Mild severity

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Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Fatigue

What are some of the most common culprits for mushroom poisoning in dogs? I've heard that it's nearly impossible to identify species without knowing beforehand (this site lists some: https://petcitadel.com/can-dogs-eat-mushrooms), and I also know that Amanita is a type to watch out for. Unfortunately, my dog ate mushrooms outside right under my nose, but he has only shown mild symptoms so far.

June 17, 2018

Sparky's Owner

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There are many different types of mushrooms which may cause mild symptoms but there are some which may be toxic; the types of mushrooms you may have near your home will depend on your climate, the type of landscape (forest etc…) among other factors. I could name different species of mushrooms but it wouldn’t help narrow in on a specific type; you should take Sparky to a Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

June 18, 2018

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Happy

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Jack Russell/ Yorkie/Hasvanese

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6 Months

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Moderate severity

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Vomiting

My dog ate a whole mushroom that we found under a tree. He did not eat the stump, however, the mushroom was by itself and spotted. It was white. My dog is just a puppy and he threw up 5 minutes after eating it. What should we do? We cannot go to the vet because of Covid19. We can see his kibble, homemade food, and the pieces of mushroom in his vomit.

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Saint

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Jack Russell Terrier

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10 Weeks

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Moderate severity

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Moderate severity

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Diarrhea And Possible Vomiting

My puppy is around 10 weeks old and I caught my puppy eating something white it looked to be a mushroom. I left for a couple errands and returned home to find poop everywhere around and in his kennel I suspect he couldn’t stand in one place while doing his business. I have yet to see any vomit but i believe there was some of that as well. It is 1am in the morning and I’m not sure what to do.

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Ellie

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Chocolate English lab

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22 Months

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Fair severity

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Fair severity

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No Symptoms

My chocolate lab Ellie ate a few mushrooms in our backyard on a Friday evening after work. Induced vomiting and she threw everything back up. Was not worried. She acted fine the next day. Sunday she found more mushrooms and ate them. Tried to induce vomiting again and it did not work. Instructed to take her to the ER per poison control. They took ellie back and gave her a strong medication and she threw up the mushroom. Because they were unsure if the mushrooms were toxic they highly recommended she stay overnight and they pumped her with fluids and gave her activated charcoal to absorb any toxins. She did really great and showed no signs of toxicity. She stayed at our primary care vet all day Monday and they monitored her. She is doing well. Thursday we are going back to the vet for another blood sample to test liver enzymes.

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Chloe

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Chihuahua

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4 Years

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Mild severity

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Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Shaking, Not Eating Or Drinking,

My female Chihuahua may have ingested a mushroom Saturday evening. I noticed her acting strange on Sunday afternoon..not wanting to walk, back legs seem affected. Her tail is hanging down, which is odd. She isn't eating or drinking, shaking and not doing anything but laying around. She did eat a little something on Sunday evening. I was able to feed her water out of my hand today and she ate a little chicken. I have boiled her some rice too. I dont know what to do, can't afford to take her to the vet. Pls help with any advice for home treatment. Not really sure what she ingested but online research gave me suspicions of mushroom ingestion.

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Ozzy

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Pomeranian

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12 Years

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Mild severity

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1 found helpful

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Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
Vomiting

We think our 12 year old dog Ozzy ingested mushrooms either Friday sometime or very early Saturday morning. Saturday about an hour or two after breakfast he vomited and had a yellowish/brownish diarrhea. He did not have much of an appetite Saturday or Sunday. Diarrhea again middle of the night Saturday, and again Sunday morning. Fine the rest of the day Sunday and then we found what looked to be mushrooms in his diarrhea Sunday night. It is now Thursday and he has had diarrhea 2 -3 times per day since. He still urinates normally. Behavior, demeanor seem ok (maybe a little fatigued? but he's always been kind of a lazy guy anyway) and his appetite seems normal as well. No vomiting following a meal since Sunday, only seems to vomit during or immediately following diarrhea. Last this happened was night before last. Does not appear to be in any more discomfort (not like he was 4-5 days ago) but still no solid stools. Is there anything we can do for him at home? We thought about Pedialyte with an oral syringe to assist with electrolyte balance and hydration but are otherwise stuck on how to help him? It's been 6-7 days since possible ingestion and only symptoms now is the infrequent diarrhea.

Mushroom Poisoning Average Cost

From 11 quotes ranging from $300 - $6,000

Average Cost

$1,200

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