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What are Nasal Polyps?

Pink polypoid growths in the nose are typically nasal polyps. However, there are different types of tumors, some of which are benign and some of which are cancerous. Polyps are far less common in dogs than in cats. Signs can include sneezing, congestion and noisy breathing.

When you find a pink growth in the nose of your dog, a nasal polyp should be considered. However, nasal tumours including carcinomas and sarcomas must be ruled out. 

Though polyps are benign (non cancerous), it’s important to have these treated as they can still make breathing difficult for your pet.

Nasal Polyps Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $500 - $3,500

Average Cost

$2,500

Symptoms of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

Depending on the location of the tumor, symptoms may vary.

  • Nasal cavity
    • Discharge with mucus
    • A crusting in the nose
    • Nosebleeds
    • Obstruction of the nasal passage
    • Sneezing
    • Noisy breathing
  • Maxillary sinus
    • Swelling in the cheek or under the eye
  • Frontal sinus
    • Swelling on the forehead
  • Ethmoid sinus
    • Obstruction of the nasal passage
    • Double vision
Types

There are many different types of nasal tumors. Benign tumors include the following:

  • Nasal polyps – a tumor located in the lining of the nasal passage
  • Inverted papilloma – a wart-like growth on the nose
  • Hemangioma – a collection of blood vessels
  • Osteoma – a tumor of the bony tissue in the nose
  • Fibrous dysplasia – an abnormal growth of the bony tissue in the nose
  • Angiofibroma – a growth comprised of fibrous tissues and blood vessels
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Causes of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

Frequently, with benign nasal tumors it is difficult to identify a cause. With nasal polyps, specifically, it’s possible the cause is an increase in inflammation and swelling of the nasal passage. It is possible that some benign nasal tumors are caused by viruses. Currently, there are no definitive causes of benign tumors in the nasal passage.

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Diagnosis of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

In order to diagnose a benign nasal tumor, the dog will typically need to be anesthetized so that the vet is able to inspect the nasal passage. Polyps are glistening red, pink, or gray growths in the nasopharynx. In addition to a physical examination, advanced imaging may be required to determine further information about the nature of the growth.

The veterinarian may use a rhinoscope to inspect the nasal passage. Like tumor manifestations in humans, the veterinarian may try to obtain a sample of the growth in order to complete a biopsy of the tumor. Once the results are determined, further decisions regarding diagnosis and treatment can be made.

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Treatment of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

The prominent and most effective treatment of benign nasal tumors is surgical removal. This surgery is typically a simple, routine procedure. If the nasal tumor is located deep inside of the nose, though, it may be difficult to remove with a surgical procedure. In the event of cancerous nasal tumors inside the nasal passage, radiation therapy is a limited treatment option to slow the growth of tumors within the nasal passage. There are anti-cancer drugs that can be tried, but benign nasal tumors are typically unresponsive to these medications.

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Recovery of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

After treatment has been administered, there will likely be a period of hospitalization to make sure that there are no complications resulting from the surgery. Your dog will need to wear a cone and will experience nasal discharge—sometimes bloody—for 1 to 2 weeks post-surgery. Once you take your dog home, it’s important to monitor your dog’s progress and be conscious of any unusual behavior that may be the result of infection. Additionally, attention should be paid towards possible relapse in which the benign tumor was not entirely removed and presents itself again.

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Nasal Polyps Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $500 - $3,500

Average Cost

$2,500

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Nasal Polyps Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Puggles

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Puggle

dog-age-icon

5 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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11 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Sneezing Bloody Noses D/C Fleshy Pieces
Sneezing Bloody Noses

My puggle had nasal polyp removal surgery this past January. He has gotten polps again. Hes on synoptic ear and nasal drops now. In the last 3 days he horrible sneezing fits with extreme nose bleeding and discharge of many polyps pieces in the blood. My question is, it's probaly not the best way to happen, but is it good these fleshy pieces are getting out of him? After these episodes and he's relaxed he seems to be in a better mood too. Any help on this ?

July 23, 2018

Puggles' Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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11 Recommendations

I'm sure that temporarily, getting those pieces of the polyp put is more comfortable for him, but long term they will likely just keep coming back, unfortunately. The polyps can be very difficult to remove, as the entire stalk has to be removed or they grow back. He may need to have the surgery repeated to help get rid of those growths.

July 23, 2018

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Blacky

dog-breed-icon

Crossbreed

dog-age-icon

12 Years

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

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30 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Blocked Nose
Panting
Mouth Breathing

Hi Dr. My 12 year old Blacky has a big polyp in her nasopharynx that is obstructing almost completely the nasal pasage. So she struggles with breathing through her nose, has difficulty to sleep, pants a lot and when is not panting her breathing looks very forced and her abdomen contracts a lot. No mucus discharge. She is on 20mg of Prednisolone and we are also giving her a homemade organic tumeric paste (natural anti-inflamatory). We are waiting for the results of the biopsy to know the type of tumor but we won´t make her go through a surgery. I would love to know if any treatment or medicine could help reduce the size of the tumor so she can breath a bit better for some time? or if the only option for her not to suffer is eutanasia? Thank you so much!

May 28, 2018

Blacky's Owner


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recommendation-ribbon

30 Recommendations

You are able to control the inflammation but not the size of the polyp(s); surgery is the treatment of choice, however I understand your concerns especially at his age. Apart from surgery, there is nothing else I can recommend to help apart from ensure that he is calm and well rested. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

May 29, 2018

Thank you so much for your loving and honest answer. It helps a lot even though it is hard because otherwise she is still her normal dog self and very healthy in all other areas, however she deserves calmness and rest... No doubt life without sleep and tranquil breathing is not life. Thank you Dr. Turner. Blessings.

May 29, 2018

Blacky's Owner

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Nasal Polyps Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $500 - $3,500

Average Cost

$2,500

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