Nasal Polyps Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $500 - 3,500

Average Cost

$2,500

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What are Nasal Polyps?

Pink growths on the nose are typically indicative of nasal tumors. There are different types of tumors, some of which are benign and some of which are cancerous. The most common tumors, though, are non-cancerous. These include nasal polyps and other conditions where nodules form that may make breathing more difficult.

When you find a pink growth on the nose of your dog, it is likely the sign of a nasal tumor. While you should still visit the veterinarian to learn more about the growth, the most common pink growths are non-cancerous. It’s important to have these treated as they can still make breathing difficult for your pet.

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Symptoms of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

Depending on the location of the tumor, symptoms may vary.

  • Nasal cavity
    • Discharge with mucus
    • A crusting in the nose
    • Nosebleeds
    • Obstruction of the nasal passage
  • Maxillary sinus
    • Swelling in the cheek or under the eye
  • Frontal sinus
    • Swelling on the forehead
  • Ethmoid sinus
    • Obstruction of the nasal passage
    • Double vision
Types

There are many different types of nasal tumors. Benign tumors, specifically, are limited to the following:

  • Nasal polyps – a tumor located in the lining of the nasal passage
  • Inverted papilloma – a wart-like growth on the nose
  • Hemangioma – a collection of blood vessels
  • Osteoma – a tumor of the bony tissue in the nose
  • Fibrous dysplasia – an abnormal growth of the bony tissue in the nose
  • Angiofibroma – a growth comprised of fibrous tissues and blood vessels

Causes of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

Frequently with benign nasal tumors it is difficult to identify a cause. With nasal polyps, specifically, it’s possible the cause is an increase in inflammation and swelling of the nasal passage. It is possible that some benign nasal tumors are caused by viruses. Currently, there are no definitive causes of benign tumors in the nasal passage.

Diagnosis of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

In order to diagnose a benign nasal tumor, the dog will typically need to be anesthetized so that the vet is able to inspect the nasal passage. Polyps, specifically, are glistening red, pink, or gray growths in the nasopharynx. In addition to a physical examination, x-rays may be required to determine further information about the nature of the growth.

The veterinarian may use a rhinoscope to inspect the nasal passage. Like tumor manifestations in humans, the veterinarian may try to obtain a sample of the growth in order to complete a biopsy of the tumor. Once the results are determined, further decisions regarding diagnosis and courses of treatment can be made.

Treatment of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

The prominent and most effective treatment of benign nasal tumors is surgical removal. This surgery is typically a simple, routine procedure. If the nasal tumor is located on the inside of the nose, though, it may be difficult to remove with a surgical procedure. In the event of nasal tumors inside the nasal passage, radiation therapy is a limited treatment option to slow the growth of tumors within the nasal passage. There are anti-cancer drugs that can be tried, but benign nasal tumors are typically unresponsive to these medications.

Recovery of Nasal Polyps in Dogs

After treatment has been administered, there will likely be a period of hospitalization to make sure that there are no complications resulting from the surgery. Your dog will need to wear a cone and will experience nasal discharge—sometimes bloody—from 1 to 2 weeks post-surgery. Once you take your dog home, it’s important to monitor your dog’s progress and be conscious of any unusual behavior that may be the result of infection. Additionally, attention should be paid towards possible relapse in which the benign tumor was not entirely removed and presents itself again.

Nasal Polyps Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

pip
Collie, Smooth
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

leisions on body swelling and blockage of nose

my 7 year old collie bitch developed small bite like lumps over her her body and nose. despite numerous inconclusive tests and the swelling worsening in her nose she has been put on steroids and we have been told it is of their opinion it is likely to be a tumour. she has no discharge or bleeding but sores on her body and swelling in her nasal cavity can there be any other diagnosis for this or am I clutching at straws

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

If there is some doubt regarding the diagnosis, a biopsy of one of the lumps could be sent for histopathology which would give a report of the types of cells present and the overall suspected cause of the lumps. Without examining Pip, I couldn’t hazard a guess based on the information provided but a biopsy sample would probably be the next best step; otherwise visiting another Veterinarian for their opinion may also be valuable. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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remy
Yorkshire Terrier
6 Years
Fair condition
-1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Difficulty Breathing

My vet cannot find anything in xrays and exam to account for trouble breathing thinks a rhynoscope is needed ...very costly what will happen if I cannot get treatment done

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

The prognosis is dependent on the condition causing the breathing trouble; this may be due to inflammation, tumours, polyps, foreign bodies or anatomical abnormalities (generally in puppies). A rhinoscope is the next step in the diagnostic step and would be useful to visualise the nasal cavity and any lesions present, also a biopsy may be taken through a working channel for analysis if needed. If rhinoscopy isn’t carried out and no effective treatment is given, it is possible that Remy will continue to have breathing difficulties and the underlying condition may progress to a point where treatment becomes life-long or a surgical approach becomes inoperable. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

 

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BLUE
German Shepherd
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

BLOCKED NOSE, MOUTH BREATHING, THICK GREEN MUCUS

Medication Used

Prednisone

I HAVE A TWELVE YEAR OLD GERMAN SHEPHERD WITH A POLYP 6 INCHES UP INSIDE THE LEFT NOSTRIL. IT IS INTERFERING WITH MY DOGS BREATHING THROUGH HIS NOSE, IT MAKES HIM SNEEZE HE ALSO DOES INVERTED SNEEZING AND HAS THICK GREEN MUCUS. I WOULD DEARLY LIKE TO HAVE IT SURGICALLY REMOVED TO AID HIS BREATHING. WHAT I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IS: CAN IT BE DONE LIKE MICRO SURGERY UP THE NOSTRIL OR WOULD IT HAVE TO BE REMOVED THROUGH THE SOFT PALLET. LIKE I SAID IT IS SIX INCHES UP INSIDE HIS NOSE. I WOULD BE VERY GRATEFUL FOR YOUR REPLY.
MANY THANKS, JANET.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

There are a few different factors which will determine the approach to surgical removal of the polyps; these include Blue’s age (older dogs pose a risk for anaesthesia and he would require a pre-anaesthetic blood test to check liver and kidney’s etc…), exact location of the polyps (bottom, top back of nasal cavity), equipment at your Veterinarian’s Clinic (not all Clinic’s have the equipment for keyhole surgery or alternative techniques), your Veterinarian’s method of preference (some Veterinarian’s prefer certain methods over others) and cost (one procedure may be significantly more expensive than the other). The exact surgery (if possible to perform at all) would have to be determined by the Veterinarian who would perform the surgery itself, discuss with your Veterinarian about the possible options that Blue may have. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

What was the answer?

We have an 11 year old Beagle who has been diagnosed with polyps - She struggles with breathing through her nose and wakes every night struggling to breath - She is on 10mg of cortisone which was working but seems to be not as affective. We have devided not to have her operated on due to her age. Basically what we would like to know is will she at some point get to the stage where she will be unable to breath...... Thank you. Kind Regards Hedy

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