Perineal Hernia Average Cost

From 173 quotes ranging from $1,500 - 5,000

Average Cost

$2,100

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What is Perineal Hernia?

The pelvic floor supports the rectum and keeps the abdominal contents in their normal positions. When the muscular diaphragm is weakened, it may rupture, allowing organs to become entrapped in the hernia. Perineal hernias exhibit as a swelling adjacent to the rectum and most commonly occurs in older unneutered dogs.

Though a perineal hernia is not life-threatening in itself, it may require an emergency response if the bladder moves through the rupture, as this can obstruct urination If a loop of intestine is trapped in the hernia, this may lead to strangulation of the bowel and loss of blood supply.

A perineal hernia is a rupture in the pelvic floor, through which an organ may protrude into the region between the anus and the scrotum. This affects a dog’s ability to urinate and defecate and may be life-threatening if the bladder or intestine is involved.

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Symptoms of Perineal Hernia in Dogs

A perineal hernia is commonly detectable as a swelling beside or below the anus. Symptoms that arise from the swelling include:

  • Straining to urinate
  • Difficulty with bowel movements
  • Constipation
  • Change in tail carriage

Clinical signs of a perineal hernia may vary depending on the organs affected. Typically, these symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Lethargy
  • Depression

Causes of Perineal Hernia in Dogs

A perineal hernia occurs when the muscular diaphragm of the pelvis weakens or fails, allowing organs to protrude into the area between the anus and the scrotum. Hernias are potentially caused by a variety of factors, including trauma, tumors, age, and congenitally. Though there is no known underlying cause for perineal hernias, the vast majority of cases occur in unneutered male dogs that are middle-aged or older, leading to the theory that male hormones or prostate enlargement weaken the pelvic floor. No strong correlation exists between breed and likelihood of the condition.

Diagnosis of Perineal Hernia in Dogs

Perineal hernias are easy to identify by digital rectal palpation. If your dog exhibits swelling around the anus, your veterinarian will ask for a history and conduct a thorough examination of the rectal region to differentiate the hernia from a tumor. Blood work and urinalysis may be required to develop a complete health profile, determine your dog’s ability to withstand treatment, and identify any concurrent diseases.

Though unnecessary in diagnosing the hernia itself, an x-ray or ultrasound can help define the hernia and determine its contents. Your veterinarian may recommend a prostate gland biopsy or an inspection of the testicles as part of the examination. If an enlarged prostate is discovered during any of these steps, additional tests may be necessary to locate the underlying cause and identify treatment.

Treatment of Perineal Hernia in Dogs

Treatment varies depending on the extent of herniation. Surgical repair and castration are standard, though non-surgical options are available for management.

Medical Management

For minor cases, medical treatment may be an option, though it does not cure the hernia or address the rupture. A combination of stool softeners, enemas, and a high fiber diet help relieve the strain of defecation, while the bladder can be decompressed with a catheter. However, this does not permanently control the disease or its symptoms, and your dog still runs the risk of having its bladder or colon trapped in the hernia.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery is usually the recommend treatment for a perineal hernia. The hernia contents will be moved back into their normal positions, and the pelvic diaphragm will be repaired. The colon and the bladder may be sutured to the abdominal wall during this process, helping stabilize those organs and prevent a reoccurrence. The pelvic diaphragm is typically reinforced with a local muscle flap or surgical mesh, completely closing the rupture. Castration is performed on intact males as part of this procedure to minimize hormones and reduce the size of the prostate, decreasing the chances of a future perineal hernia.

Recovery of Perineal Hernia in Dogs

Antibiotics will be prescribed to combat potential contamination that arises due to the location of the surgical site. Your veterinarian will likely prescribe painkillers to ease your dog’s discomfort, though you should also modify your dog’s diet and employ stool softeners to ease defecation during the healing process. This minimizes straining, which reduces pain while preventing too much stress from being applied to the reconstructed muscles.

The surgical area needs to be kept clean and dry, and you will need to limit your dog’s physical activity during this time. An Elizabethan collar may be necessary to keep your dog from licking or biting at the surgical site. The prognosis is good for most non-emergency cases, though your vet may recommend regular follow-up examinations to ensure that the repair is healing properly and that the possibility of recurrence is low.

Cost of Perineal Hernia in Dogs

Stool softeners for dogs are usually $15 for 40 soft chews. Consult your veterinarian before trying human stool softeners on your dog. Enemas ($4 for a 4 pack) are another option. Changing your dog’s food to a high fiber diet will also help your dog’s condition and overall health. These special dog foods sell for $35 to $40 per 30lb bag. These options will not cure your dog’s perineal hernia, but rather relieve the strain and discomfort your dog is feeling. Surgery is usually the only option to cure a perineal hernia. Surgery can be used to move the hernia back into normal position and to repair the pelvic diaphragm. This surgery can cost $1,500 or more. The veterinarian may decide to castrate your dog (intact males only, obviously) which reduces the size of the prostate and decreases the chances of the hernia reoccurring. This can cost an additional $170 to $200.

Perineal Hernia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Hunter
Beagle
8 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

My dog was diagnosed with perineal hernia. Soft and canned foods are given but now we wake up and/or come home to dark diarrhea splats and piles ecery day and night. We have opted not to have the surgery. What now?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Usually constipation or straining to defecate is a symptom of Perineal Hernia; diarrhoea may be due to irritation of the gastrointestinal tract (may be caused by a change of food) or part of another disease process. The cause of Perineal Hernia’s is theorised to be caused by weakening of pelvic diaphragm in older intact males. I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian to check the hernia to ensure that it hasn’t grown in size and affecting the surrounding structures which may have lead to incontinence. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

 

Took our dog in today because he was barking in pain when he tried to defacate followed by runny/bloody stool and vomiting. The region just to either side of his anus was swollen as well. He wasn’t eating or drinking and was very lethargic. Within an hour of getting him to the vet his temp had dropped so low that he had to be warmed up and he had to be put on IV just to get a blood sample taken. The diagnosis was a perineal hernia and the only solution was surgery. He was 11 years old and intact. The vet also indicated that his kidney function was diminished. We had to have him put down. I say all this to say... if your pet is experiencing these symptoms take it to the vet before any other organs become compromised and decrease the success rate of the surgery.

We are having the same symptoms with our 8 year old yorkie. We were trying to prolong the outcome of surgery but waking up to dark diarrhea splattered everywhere is not working! Is that a symptom of the hernia?

My dog has a soft swelling within this area, that first noticed in the summer. He started losing his fur and he was diagnosed hypothyroid. I'm still nervous that his fur loss may be due to a testicular tumor, though his testicles appear to be the same size. Are these usually symptomatic? Idk if noticed this swelling because it seems new or if it's because my dog lost fur, so it's more obvious. He doesn't seem to have any discomfort when I touch the area and his has no problem with using the restroom.

My dog had a operation to remove 2 perineal hernias about a year ago. The operation was a success. The only issue he has now is that after the operation his poop builds up below his anus, turns hard and makes it hard for him to pass. Some times I have to help him pass it by pushing in below his anus. The vet has him on steroids to try and build up some muscle below his anus but it doesn't seem to be working. Do you have any advice?

My 8 year old boxer was dx'd with such condition, Vet recommends castration and repair, my question is, if he is just neutered will that stop any further herniation (dx'd with enlarged prostate also) ? The procedure is costing $6000, and whether or not how much benefit this will provide and 8 year old boxer ? and why 8 years of vet visits NONE recommended neutering (as it seems this, statistically, is the underlying cause of the enlarged prostate and herniation. Dog has NO issue with defecation.

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Zeus
Doberman Pinscher
7 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Defecate
Straining to Defecate

I'm confused. I have a new rescue 7yo otherwise healthy intact male doberman exhibiting signs of perineal hernia. Confirmed by vet and ultrasound shows enlarged prostate. I had him 2 days before learning (during checkup) of the likely pending $2k-$3k surgery (plus castration). Rather than letting him go back, where his condition will likely be ignored and eventually euthanized, I guess I'll bite the bullet and save this sweet, big guy. My real question concerns how to ensure soft, straining-free stools in the meantime. My wonderful vet, who has seen very few of these perineal hernias over 35 years of practice says feed him LOW-fiber, under 1.7% if possible, but as I read everything I can find about the condition, I'm hearing to go high fiber. What do I do? Is fiber recommended for both softening AND firming stools?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Firstly, I am always happy to read about people taking in rescue dogs, so many animals looking for a loving home. As you have been informed by your Veterinarian, surgical correction of the perineal hernia along with castration is the treatment of choice for this condition; medical and dietary management play an important part, I would recommend feeding a high fibre diet to add more water to his stool as well as stool softeners to ensure ease of passage of faeces. However, there may be a specific reason why your Veterinarian advised a low fibre diet, so I would still recommend speaking with him as Zeus is under his professional care. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chicho
Chihuahua
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Constipation
Green diarrhea

Early this year my senior chihuahua developed a perineal hernia. When I took him to the vet to get it removed they told me he could not have surgery. Apparently his hernia is attached to the bone and he can't have surgery. He often cries and spends so much time trying to poop. He currently eats dog chow beef but I noticed its to harsh for me. What are some rich fiber foods he could consume?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

In severe cases like Chico’s it would be best to supplement his diet with plain canned pumpkin or to give him a stool softener to help loosen the stool and to reduce the amount of straining whilst defecating; high fibre food diets on their own probably wouldn’t be sufficient on their own so stool softeners would be the way to go. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

High fiber is bad for perineal herina. You need low fiber which has a similar effect but prevents build up of hard stool. Miralax and a prescription low fiber canned food is great. As things get better you can possibly add a low fiber puppy food with a little water to soften it up in to the mix. I went through this for 5 years and low fiber is the way to go on this type of issue.

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AJ
Boston Terrier mix
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

inguinal hernia, constipation, urinary dribbling.

My husband and I rescued a 9 year old Boston Terrier mix. He was neutered at the Humane Society prior to bring him home. We were told that he had a fatty tumor in the groin area.We were expecting to pay several hundred dollars to get this fixed. The vet said that the bulge in the groin area was an inguinal hernia. We also noticed he was constipated and that when he got in the position to defecate that a large bulge appeared under the anal area. When the vet did a rectal exam the pouch was very large when probed. This was diagnosed as a Perieal Hernia. He was also having some urinary dribbling problems. Gave the vet the urine sample and found that he an UTI. That was cultured and found to be ecoli. He likes carrots so that has been added to him diet and is working to soften his stool. Don't know what to do at this point.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

In cases where basic bodily functions are bring affected, surgical correction is recommended to ensure that the dog is comfortable and isn’t in pain or discomfort which can have a profound effect on their general health, appetite and behaviour. Whilst I understand that surgery isn’t cheap, the hernia will remain a problem and may have knock on effects in the future; involvement of organs can lead to a medical emergency which may be life threatening. Whilst surgery is the treatment of choice, medical management is a short-term fix (usually for patients not suited for immediate surgery) consisting of stool softeners, dietary management and pain relief; also the urinary tract infection would need antibiotics. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mason
Dachshund terrier mix
7
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Straining To Defecate
Anal Itching

Hello!

My 7 year old dachshund/terrier mix recently slipped a disc in his back and has been getting at home treatment with confinement, rest and medication from my vet. This happened two weeks ago. I took him to get a spinal laser treatment tonight and mentioned that I had noticed him slamming his backside into the carpet repeatedly the times I had him on the floor earlier. They said they would express his anal glands. My regular vet was out so a new vet did it. She came out and told me she felt a "mass" inside the rectal wall that was not attached to the anal glands but along the wall. She said I should keep an eye on it and have it checked again in a few weeks. What will they be looking for and what should I be looking for? Is this likely to be a perineal hernia? This is such a stressful time right now with making sure his back is ok and now I get this news. Should I do anything else? Is a biopsy essential? I am unemployed and already experiencing financial stress from everything I have done over the last two weeks for him with his slipped disc. I don't know how much these tests cost but what can I do to make sure he gets the care he needs?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Generally a mass as you have described would most likely be a perineal hernia (especially in intact males); other causes could be an abscess or tumour. With this situation, a wait and see approach is taken initially to see if there is growth or resolution. Because of the straining while defecating, medical management of stool softeners are usually prescribed along with dietary management to prevent excessive straining causing additional damage. Usually diagnosis is made by physical palpation by the rectum with ultrasound being used to determine severity and organ involvement; biopsy wouldn’t be taken unless the mass was suspected to be a tumour or an unknown growth. Medical management is a short term fix (usually whilst a patient is being stabilized for surgery due to a pre-existing condition) with surgery being the option of choice for resolution. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Brock
pitbull
10
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Constipation
Diarrhea
Swelling
Incontinence

Hi thank you for taking the time to read this. My intact 9yo Pitbull male was diagnosed with a perineal hernia last year. We got the surgery however the vet said it might not hold and it didn't :( he is swelling to the right of his rectum and he has been urinating everywhere and had problems defecating. Either her can't go at all or it's straight liquid. I've noticed a change in his demeanor as well. Is there anything else that can be done? Or is it a waiting game?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

As I am sure your Veterinarian had advised you that perineal hernia’s are more common in intact older males; you hadn’t considered neutering Brock when he was operated on previously? Neutering has may other benefits like not worrying about testicular cancer or prostate problems etc… Another surgery may be possible, but would need to be opened to check viability; alternatively giving Brock stool softeners will allow easy passage of faeces and hopefully will prevent straining which may exasperate the hernia. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Sorry I missed your reply yes we got him neutered during the hernia surgury. I stated "intact" so u knew that was the cause of the hernia :/ he has started drinking excessive water which causes him to urinate A lot And in the house. We took him in for blood work yesterday and still no answers. Diabetes was ruled out, but she mentioned something about his liver or cushings disease. Is seems this is all
Complications from the hernia however she said it was separate. Again, I appreciate your time!

I'm so sorry missed your reply.. yes we got him neutered during the hernia surgery.... I stated "intact" so u knew that was the cause of the hernia. Things have gotten worse though and we took him in for blood work yesterday. He has began drinking water excessively and feening for scraps (not necessarily his food but any other food) he was always super picky his whole life. He carries his body differently too, hunched over, tail down, ears back. Blood work ruled out diabetes but the vet said possibly cushings disease or something with the liver, But no exact answers. It seems to me all complications from the hernia... like his body is slowly being poisoned from leaking stool is that possible? I appreciate your time again!!!

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Scooby
Dachshund
10-13
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Butt area swollen on the left side
problem in defecating,

My Dachshund, Scooby has been diagnosed with Perineal hernia about a week ago. His butt area is swollen on the left side but the swelling does not seem very severe. He was highly constipated but the vet prescibed some medications which have improved the constipation. Before he was also very lethargic and walked in a weird manner. After giving him the medicines for constipation, he is defecating but not as much as he used to before the hernia. He still has difficulty in defecating and has to try a few times before he can do it. He does not seem to be in any pain and is also not lethargic any more. His butt area is still swollen. He does not have any problem in urinating. The vet suggested surgery, but we cannot afford it. Scooby is also very aggressive and can sometimes even bite the family members so it will be difficult to care for him post surgery, if we can somehow manage to get it done. I am very worried about him. Please offer some suggestions.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Perineal hernias are common in old intact male dogs; surgery is the treatment of choice along with neutering and the pelvic diaphragm on the opposite side is usually strengthened at the same time. Medical and dietary management is usually reserved for mild cases or for animals that need to be stabilised prior to surgery by giving wet food and stool softeners; your Veterinarian will be able to discuss the options with you specifically for Scooby’s case. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My 9yr old male Maltese was diagnosed with a perennial hernia in April. The vet gave a $3000 plus estimate for surgery which I can't afford l spent months trying to find other options which I did. His surgery was scheduled for tomorrow and the dr called and postponed it 10 days. The dog has lump on right side constipation and pain and is very snappy and snarly with every one no one can touch him I'm stressed out about having to deal with this for 10 more days

I'm so sorry missed your reply.. yes we got him neutered during the hernia surgery.... I stated "intact" so u knew that was the cause of the hernia. Things have gotten worse though and we took him in for blood work yesterday. He has began drinking water excessively and feening for scraps (not necessarily his food but any other food) he was always super picky his whole life. He carries his body differently too, hunched over, tail down, ears back. Blood work ruled out diabetes but the vet said possibly cushings disease or something with the liver, But no exact answers. It seems to me all complications from the hernia... like his body is slowly being poisoned from leaking stool is that possible? I appreciate your time again!!!

I commented in the wrong section :/ sorry

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Toby
toy poodle
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Perianal hernia ,

I have toy poodle y was diagnostic with Perianal hernia he is 14 years old, do you recommend surgery at this age? Please I would appreciate your advice. Sincerely Aleida

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

The decision to go forward with surgery would be dependent on Toby’s overall health, results of blood tests to determine anaesthesia suitability and the severity of the hernia. If the hernia isn’t causing much concern, conservative treatment with stool softeners and a wet diet may be sufficient, if the hernia is bad surgery would be indicated. These are options to discuss with your Veterinarian as they can determine the severity. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Cracker dog
Terrier chayawa
4 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Hard time bowels peeing peeing uncontrolably large

Hello I have a terrior who has a large what looks like a sock or bone or both around his back side under his tail its at least 2 inches swollen around his anus right more than left we been feeding him broth and rice it has gone down some so we continued the regular diet and its swollen again along with irritateing his urine and hard to have a bowl he is now peeing on the bed what do we do he is back on the rice and broth we cant afford surgery at this time or are there any vets that will do payments for the surgery

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

In cases of a large perineal hernia that is affecting urination and other functions would require surgery. Whilst surgery can be expensive there are numerous options available to finance them including a pet care loan from Vetary, speak with your Veterinarian about Vetary (as well as looking at this site) to pay for the surgery. Until surgery is carried out ensure that the stool remains loose (feed mineral oil with the food) so that the hernia isn’t exasperated with straining to defecate. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bulbul
Japanese spitch + aapso
3 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Anal sacs in left side of anus

Medication Used

Betardin and neosan for wound and antibiotic

My dog was diagnosed with anal sacs first my vet the sacs brust and my vet did dressing and injected him with antibiotics and then prescribed oral antibiotic for night time..today is day four and his wound was swollen then my vet extracted the puss and said it might be hernia as well. My dog is female her name is bulbul she is 3 years old she is small and a mix of japenes spitch and aapso

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

It is possible that anal sac problems caused difficulty in defecating which in turn may lead to increased pressure in the abdomen during defecation which can cause a perineal hernia. An x-ray could confirm (if your Veterinarian cannot palpate with his finger). Also, surgery may be required to correct the hernia and remove any debris or abscess capsule. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Fluffy
Stray
14 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Perianal hernia ,

I have a 80 lbs 14 year old stray dog with a Perineal hernia. he has been operated once before and was also neutered during that operation. He still defecates and urinates himself. I made an underpants for him to support the hernia so it does not hang causing strain. I give him enema's periodically and a soft diet to keep his intestines soft. The vet said operating him is not an option anymore since the hernia returned on both sides and his age is to advanced.
My question is about the underpants, since I have been looking for one to buy online and could not find one I wonder why nothing like that is for sale and if I am wrong to push the hernia back in?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Generally, if the hernia isn’t causing pain or discomfort there isn’t a need to push it back in and if it is, surgery usually follows. The reasoning behind a lack of special underwear or hernia support for dogs is probably due to the limited market and the fact it would be classed as a medical device imposing costly regulatory hurdles to bring such a product to market. A soft diet and stool softeners would normally be sufficient in most cases. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bear
Bullmastiff
9
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

blood on stool
Constipation
uncomfortable
Straining to Defecate
swollen butt

Hi, my family dog (Bear) has a perineal hernia and a significantly large colon. He is a Mastador (Mastiff/Black Lab) and is 9 years old. He is in absolute perfect health, besides the hernia and the colon. We first noticed his symptoms 2 years ago. My mom and dad opted not to do the surgery, and now things are so out of control (extremely constipated, fecal matter everywhere etc) that they are going to put him down. I work in the dental field and my mind is trained to fix things. He is an extremely healthy dog -- not like he has cancer or an abnormality that cannot be fixed. But my mom says that because of his age and size (he is 108 lbs) that this is the best option. She keeps telling me his quality of life will be poor if he has the surgery.... Our vet doesn't perform these types of procedures and referred us to a specialized surgeon...my parents did not even take him. I am super disappointed that they did not even take the next step to get a consult from a surgeon. :( Am I crazy for thinking that putting him down is NOT the best option?? From what I have read, this is a very common occurrence in dogs...Any help/advice is appreciated. Thank you. -Reanna-

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

From what you have described, I cannot imagine a problem with visiting the Specialist to see what can be done. A nine year old dog should be OK to have anaesthesia (pending pre surgery blood tests) and whilst the surgery may not be 100% curative (there may be faecal and urinary incontinence afterwards) Bear would at least be more comfortable. Of course I am speaking generally as I haven’t examined Bear, but a consultation with the Specialist would be worth doing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank You. SO much.

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Fluffy
Lhasa Apso
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Constipation
Lathirgy

Hello,

About year ago my now 11 year old mini American Eskimo/Lhasa Apso 22lb dog was diagnosed with perineal hernia. I was terrified. After much research and hesitation I decided to wait and see. I added warm water to his diet, pumpkin and very rarely lactolose. He is rarely constipated, full of energy, no pain and eats everything. He passes bowl and pees normal. Very rarely he has constipation issues and lethargy. His bump on bottom started to grow visibly much larger. However, he is not in any pain. I took him to the vet recently and was told that he has bilateral perineal hernia. Because he doesn't poop normally the canal on the bottom also needs to be fixed so that he poops straight like he is suppose to. My dog is in good health, his blood work is good with a little bit elevated cholesterol.

My concern is so much surgery for his age. Will he survive? One vet suggested to do right side first, see how he does and then the second. The other vet is saying he can do both, but there are risks associate with this such as inflammation and possible loose stool for rest of his life. To me that's sounds like a torture and unnecessary based on how I see him now. Also the after care is worrisome to me. I mean, dog is not a human and you can't make him take the medication if he is in pain. Or how I would feed him.

Right now I'm torturing myself with thoughts and how I should deal with this situation, to do the surgery or not? I mean sometimes he has bad days where is lethargic or constipated, but they are not long and he always comes back to his normal. He is not suffering right now. I need to make this hard decision and I can't. Please advise me. Thank you so much.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Surgery is the treatment of choice, however it needs to be balanced against the possible risks including a loss of continence. There is no real right or wrong answer, your Veterinarian would be concerned with potential problems in the future like strangulation or obstruction and would prefer to fixed the hernias to prevent further complications; medical management will only go so far. I would personally recommend the surgery, both sides at the same time to prevent an additional anaesthesia; as Fluffy’s owner, you need to make the decision as we (Veterinarians) can only make recommendations. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Are there any other options besides the surgery? I feel like it's very invasive.

Hi I just thought I could give you a bit of ease I've been reading all theese comments my dog was diagnosed with a perineal hernia when he was 10 he's now 12 and had his op today he made it fine through the op as he is a old boy and everything went fine he sounds the same to how your explaing fluffy to be lots of energy seemd not to be bothered but it came to a point the past few months around his bottom was becoming swallon at least once a week and he's been constipated,I was told surgery was the only cure for him as they need to tighten the muscles inside, I definitely recommend the surgery to be done the same time so saves him the stress of going through it twice also getting him castrated helps :) hope I was some help for you best of luck

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Sly
Japanese Spitz
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

None

Medication Used

Milk thistle
Duphalac syrup
Glucosamine/chondroitin/Omega 3 joint supplement
COQ10
c-lium
vco
fish oil

My dog had his 2nd perineal hernia repair and colopexy 2 days ago. a day before the surgery, he had his bloodtest done. My concern is about the bloodtest result. His RBC, HGB, HCT are a little high. His platelets were always below normal value for the past 2 years but suprisingly, it is normal this time. Please help me understand the result for these:

GLB - 221 (normal value 23-45)
ALB - 21 (normal value 26-43)
TP - 242.6 (normal value 51-78)
K - 25.1 (normal value (3.80-5.60)
Na - 62 (normal value 140-154)
GLU - 3.37 (normal value 3.88-5.83)

ALP, ALT, CREA, BUN and CI are all at normal range.

Thank you and hope to hear from you soon.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Slight increases in red blood cells, haemoglobin and haematocrit can be caused by dehydration; the potassium and sodium levels as well as the globulins may be connected to adrenal gland disorders. Further testing and discussion with your Veterinarian regarding these blood results. Protein losing nephropathy or enteropathy can also affect protein levels in the blood. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Joker
German Sheppard mix
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Swollen Abdomen

Medication Used

N/A

What can I give my dog for a perineal hernia, he licks it to the point where it bleeds. What can I do or give him that would help out. Also has a bump to the right of his butt, this really concerned me

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

There isn’t really anything to give to Joker for his perineal hernia as this is a problem which is corrected with surgery and is managed with stool softeners to ease the passage of digesta to be defecated; an Elizabethan collar may help. The hernia will continue to be there unless surgically corrected and would continue to cause irritation; eleven is old but may not be too old for surgery, this would need to be discussed with your Veterinarian. Was the hernia diagnosed by your Veterinarian? As there are other issues like anal gland cancer which can cause swelling and irritation to the perineal area. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Mickey Cosme
chihuahua mix
7 yrs 9 months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Bloody mucus
Shaking

Medication Used

Rimadyl, Docusate Sodium & Clavamox
Lactulose

My dog Mickey was diagnosed with Perineal Hernia on his right side. It is trying to push through his colon. He was scheduled for surgery yesterday. Unfortunately other emergency surgeries took priority and they rescheduled him for Thursday. So he came home very sedated and out of it, he keeps trying to poop but nothing is coming out. Now he tried to poop again and I noticed he is constipated again however he did manage to poop. I just found a bloody mucus with a little loose poop in the house right after he just got done pooping outside. He has been shacking a lot since he came home from the Vets. Is it normal for him to have a bloody mucus/stool? If not should I call the Vet?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Bloody stool isn’t a normal occurrence in cases of perineal hernia; some small amounts of blood may occur during straining to defecate, however if there is a large quantity of blood I would visit your Veterinarian or Emergency Clinic to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Homer
Pittbull mix
11
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

None

Medication Used

Medacam and Gabapentin

We just adopted a 10 year old pit bull from a shelter. He has a perineal hernia on the left side. At the time of the adoption he was intact but we had him neutered. He has no urinary or defecation symptoms and pees and poops normally. His enlarged prostate has been cultured negative, and ultrasound shows it has visibly shrunk since the neuter one month ago.

The shelter vet recommended surgery for the hernia. However our regular vet seems to think that--since there are no symptoms--that the hernia can be medically managed. He even mentioned that as the testosterone leaves the bloodstream the hernia could improve (though not go away). Is this true? I'm struggling with whether to just do the surgery preemptively. He's eleven, but in good health.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Intact males are more prone to perineal hernias than neutered males; I would recommend having the hernia corrected so that the risk of complications are reduced, however many cases of perineal hernia are managed medically and the response to management is usually positive. Whilst surgical correction is treatment of choice, recurrence is common and may require further surgeries; this decision is ultimately down to you, if you choose the medical management route you just need to ensure that there is no straining whilst defecating. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bobby
Chihuahua
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Swollen Anal
Fecal spotting

My 12-year-old male chihuahua has had 2 perineal hernia repair surgeries, each surgery correcting the left and right side. The first surgery was done 2 years ago and the second surgery was just 3 months ago. Yesterday he was constipated and straining and passed feces which was very hard, large and round. Now I'm concerned that he may have ruptured the hernia again because he's leaking small drops of feces and he is very uncomfortable. I want to find another Doctor who's experienced with this type of surgery to take him to as I've already spent over $3000 for the surgeries and I'm worried about the occurrence of this happening when it's only been 3 months since the last surgery. I'm also very worried if he does have another hernia (again) how much more of this can he endure with him being older and will it just keep continuing. I'm at a loss and could really need some guidance.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Recurrence of perineal hernias are not uncommon and may not be able to be repaired a second time in some cases; each case is different, but your Veterinarian would be able to tell you if there has been a recurrence. It would be best to give Bobby stool softeners to reduce the need for straining whilst defecating. If you are looking for an experienced Veterinarian, try your nearest Veterinary School as you would find a specialist there. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Otis
Boxer
8
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Blood In Urine
Swelling

My 8 year old boxer was dx'd with such condition, Vet recommends castration and repair, my question is, if he is just neutered will that stop any further herniation (dx'd with enlarged prostate also) ? The procedure is costing $6000, and whether or not how much benefit this will provide and 8 year old boxer ? and why 8 years of vet visits NONE recommended neutering (as it seems this, statistically, is the underlying cause of the enlarged prostate and herniation. Dog has NO issue with defecation.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Whilst it would be nice if neutering was a fix, the hernia would still need to be repaired as the severity of the hernia may increase due to straining whilst defecating; once the hernia is formed due to a defect in the pelvic floor, any additional straining or movement may cause strangulation which then becomes a more expensive medical emergency. Medical management and dietary changes may help in the short term, it is still in Otis’s interest to have the surgery done sooner rather than later. As for neutering recommendation, I cannot speak for other Veterinarian’s but I always suggest neutering if an animal isn’t intended to be bred. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Rosco
Australian Shepherd
10 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargic

Our 10 year old male aussie was diagnosed with the beginning stages of a perineal hernia about 4 months ago. He was neutered at about 6 years old right after we adopted him. Yesterday he was examined for a second time and the doctor said he now has a very small pocket and recommended we monitor him for signs of swelling. I have not noticed any symptoms other than he has been a little lethargic last few days but he is still able to eat and run around. He just doesn't seem quite as energetic. Should this be repaired surgically at this point before it becomes an emergency? He did have a full blood panel done 4 months ago and his thyroid was borderline low and that was retested yesterday and we are waiting for test results. Thank you.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Perineal hernias can be quite troublesome in some cases and may require emergency surgery. The decision to operate would rest with you, it is possible that no further clinical signs develop but there is always the risk of the hernia growing in size and causing problems with faecal incontinence and urinary incontinence among other complications. Preventive surgery is an option, but monitoring the size is a usual course of action if there are no major symptoms. You need to take in to account Rosco’s age and suitability for surgery weighing up the possible risks with reward, again this falls with you. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hi my dog oscar has a perineal hernia he is 12 he was 10 when it was diagnosed and we had his castrated then he had it for 2 years before he went in for his surgery today, weighing 20 kg His op is now done and he is now recovering but everything went fine . Just a piece of mind good luck :)

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Chevy
Yorkie
12 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Perianal hernia ,

My dog has been recently diagnosed with a perianal hernia via a rectal exam. The doctor said I could just watch this for now and monitor. She also recommend that he start Miralax to help with his straining. She said surgery may be needed if this becomes bothersome for him. I have been trying to monitor his stools to make sure he isn't constipated. She said that if the problem becomes an emergency, I may see that he isn't able to poop or pee. I have been feeling his stomach to make sure it isn't too distended. I was wondering at what point should I think about surgery.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Perineal hernias like many types of hernias can be lived with, depending on the severity. Stool softeners should help with the straining, but if you notice that Chevy is in continued discomfort or pain it would be best to proceed with the surgery. In some instanced the hernia becomes large enough to create a visible bulge next to the anus, again in this instance it is best to do the surgery. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jackie
pomeranian cross
9
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Pain
Swellling on right side of recrum
Excessive panting and shiver. Unable to defecate

Medication Used

Milk of magnesia

My dog is diagnosed with hernia by a doctor. This causes him lot of trouble to defecate . He is unable to naturally defecate. We ourself have to manually defecate it. He is suffering from extreme swellling near right side of rectum and is easy is to recognize he has perineal hernia. From two days he is having severebswelling on right side. Seems as if the mass is increased double in size. And starts to shiver a lot and has excessive panting. We tried guving him ibuprofen. It did relieve the pain but still he has lot of pain. I manually put all the lump back to in his tummy but it gets back into place again. And causes him extreme pain. He is having episodes of excessive shiver and panting for 30 mins in 6 hours. Rather it has no specific time.... Is this an emergency?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

Whilst not necessarily an emergency, perineal hernias cause pain, discomfort and trouble defecating. The problem is, if you manually reduce the hernia, it will return and with the constant straining whilst trying to defecate will only put more pressure on the hernia. Corrective surgery would be required and strengthening of the pelvic diaphragm would be treatment of choice, until then stool softeners with wet food and possibly some pumpkin should help Jackie to defecate easier (milk of magnesia may not be sufficient). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Charlie
miniature dachshund
8 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Constipation
di

I am fostering an 8 year old male miniature dachshund. He had surgery for a perineal hernia about a month ago. He was neutered also. Unfortunately the surgery didn't work. He is scheduled to have another hernia repair surgery this week. What are the chances it will work this time? Although I feed him canned dog food and give him laxatives, defecating is very difficult and messy.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

The success of another surgery will be dependent on the integrity of the pelvic diaphragm, but I would be less hopeful of success given an already failed attempt, but the surgery should be attempted anyway; some sources claim 60-75% success for second surgeries but a lot of this would be dependent on the experience of the surgeon. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Sammy
Dachshund
11 Years
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

post surgery for perineal hernia
wetting in bed

My friend's 11 y/old neutered dachshund had successful surgery for a perineal hernia about two months ago. Sammy seems fine, much more alert and active than before. Just in the past 7-10 days he has been biting and licking in the area along his side foreward from where the pouch protruded, not in the anal area where the scar is. He has tended to do this in the past although in different places... he is going to have a bath and be deflea-ed although no one has spotted a flea. Twice Sammy in the 7-10 days Sammy has wet in his bed when my friend was gone for awhile... not for a long time. Usually if he has to pee in the house he chooses somewhere not near his bed. He sleeps with my friend and has not wet there. We are concerned that this is related to the surgery. Sammy was adopted late in life and has a history of separation anxiety that pretty much disappeared now that he goes almost everywhere with my friend. He is certificated as my friend's therapy dog; keeping Sammy healthy is very important. Also, he comes to the mental health wellness center I supervise and eats treats with everyone. What do you think? Otherwise he acts perfectly fine.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

 

One of the symptoms of perineal hernia is urinary incontinence in some cases, but we would see the incontinence before surgical correction and not afterwards (especially after two months). The biting around the area of the surgical site maybe indicative of pressure placed on the pelvic diaphragm (perineal hernias may recur) or local irritation of tissue. It would be useful to bathe and give flea and tick treatment to make sure that isn’t the cause. Otherwise I would suggest having a rectal examination performed to see if your Veterinarian can palpate anything. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you so much... a great service here!

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Sly
Japanese Spitz
5 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

overweight
swollen

Medication Used

COQ10
Duphalac syrup

Hello
My dog is a male 5-year old Japanese Spitz-Samoyed mixed. He weighs 19kg. He had his Perineal Hernia surgery almost 2 months now. But the operated area still swollen but he does not show any discomfort. Infact, he is more active now. I give him COQ10 for the muscle and Duphalac to soften his stool. My concern is, why is the operated area still swollen after 2 months and can his weight contribute to a possible recurrence?
Thank you and hope to hear from you soon.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

The swelling should have gone down in the time since the surgery. Recurrence may occur for many reasons including failure of surgery, intra abdominal pressure during urination or defecation or the development of an abscess in the area. It is a good sign that Sly is active and is moving around. If you have concerns, it may be best to visit your Veterinarian to have a quick check to put your mind at rest. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

By the way, he got neutered too the same time as the hernia surgery.

Thanks for the help 😊🐶

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Sly
Japanese Spitz
5 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

swollen

Medication Used

Glucosamine/chondroitin/Omega 3 joint supplement
fish oil
duhalac
coq10

Since Perineal hernia is due to a weakened muscle, is there any supplement/vitamins I should give my dog to lower the risk of recurrence and strengthen his muscle? Btw, he had hernia surgery 2 months ago and now there's a small one again :( The vet needle aspirate it and says it's the bladder this time. Thank you

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations

The best course of action would be to prevent straining as muscle strengthening comes from exercising the muscle which isn’t an option. Wet food, stool softeners, plain pumpkin etc… in the diet so that there is no straining to defecate which in turn would put pressure on the pelvic diaphragm. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you so much

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Bella
Yorkie
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My 11 y/o female Yorkshire terrier had a bilateral perineal hernia repair almost 3 weeks ago by a Board certified surgeon. Today, I notice a bulge again on her left anal area when he barked but went inside right after. Is this a normal occurrence during healing process or a failed surgery? Please advised.

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1722 Recommendations
Perineal hernias have a recurrence rate of around 10% to 15% as stated on the American College of Veterinary Surgeons website page on the subject; if you are noticing a bulge you should return to the Specialist for a check of the site to make sure that there isn’t anything to be immediately concerned with. It is important that Bella is on stool softeners and isn’t straining whilst defecating. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.acvs.org/small-animal/perineal-hernias

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Shih Tzu
7 Years
Serious
Has Symptoms
Perineal Hernia
Cyst
Constipation
My 7 yr old Shih Tzu had bilateral perineal hernias and exhibited signs of severe constipation. I was told by the Vet that his prostate must be the undelying cause and he needed to be neutered. Digital exam of the prostate didn't find any overly large prostate. So there was a contradiction right off the start. The problem is we were never offered an ultrasound, only a guess which this vet stood firm on. As it turned out he had a large cyst on his prostate that was only discovered upon surgery where I reluctantly gave the ok to neuter. I never wanted to neuter him and an angry that the surgeon never tried to find out the underlying cause. With the cyst easily drained the constipation would have alleviated and I believe he should have been fine after the surgery without neutering.