Introduction

You’ve decided to open your heart and home to a senior dog. No doubt about it, the world needs more people like you. For various reasons, older dogs can suddenly find themselves without a home, and oftentimes, these precious pooches are overlooked for younger pups in the adoption process. But you’ve found your new four legged sidekick and are ready to give them a furever home. In return, your new pal will give you heaping doses of unconditional love and years of pawsome companionship. Read on to find out what you can expect when adopting a senior dog.

Adjustment

Being welcomed into a new home is a big change for a senior dog, especially if they’re coming from a shelter. Your furry friend needs some time to adjust to their new surroundings. Even though doggos are resilient and can adapt, it can be a while before they feel at home. This can take days, weeks or months. If your pooch really misses their previous owner, they may be sad or depressed at first. There are some things you can do to help them with the transition. For the first few days, avoid unnecessary stress like grooming or visitors. Be patient as your pal gets acquainted with their new routine. Spend as much time with them as you can during this adjustment period. Feed your older doggo small meals a couple times a day. Remember, each dog is unique. Also, make sure you stay pawsitive since your dog can sense your energy.

Behavior and Training

True or False- senior dogs come with baggage and are poorly behaved? This is false. Most senior dogs are given up because their people’s circumstances change. It is true that some older dogs have significant issues, but for the most part, adoptable senior dogs have been trained and socialized. What a pawsome advantage! This means your new pal won’t have the chewing tendencies of a puppy, they love being in their crate, they are housebroken, and they know basic commands. Plus, your new senior friend isn’t bursting with puppy energy. When they arrive in your home, there will probably be some new rules they need to learn, and there may be a bad habit or two that needs to be nixed. But guess what, old dogs really can learn new tricks! In fact, since their attention span is more focused, they are easier to train. Just remember, consistency is impawtant.

Health

Since the newest member of your pack is older, the reality is they may have some health issues. Before bringing them home, find out if your dog has any health problems. It’s also impawtant to know what ailments senior dogs can develop. One of the most common conditions older pups face is arthritis or joint pain. After years of wear and tear, their joints are finally paying the price. Your senior pooch may be deaf or blind. In this case, take extra time to introduce them to their new environment and keep your home free of obstacles. Schedule regular vet visits throughout the year to keep on eye on any developing issues. While a dog’s senior years can be rewarding, they can also be costly, especially if your pal has a chronic condition. Make sure you are able to cover any vet bills that may incur so you can keep them comfortable for years to come.
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A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers