First Walk is on Us!

✓ GPS tracked walks
✓ Activity reports
✓ On-demand walkers
Book FREE Walk

Jump to Section

What is Urinating in His Crate?

When a dog is kept in her crate during the day, he may urinate in his space. A dog may urinate in his crate just one time a day, depending on how long he is kept contained. If a dog is kept in his crate all day long or all night, he may urinate several times. 

If a dog is in his crate for a short period of time, he may only urinate one time. This depends on if he has gone outside to the bathroom before he was put in. Also, many dogs feel that their crate is like a “safe haven” and they want to keep it clean; therefore, they may not urinate in their safe place.

If a dog is urinating in his crate, there may be other reasons why. Reasons he may be urinating in his crate include:

  • Improperly trained
  • Prolonged time in crate
  • Anxiety
  • Overactive bladder
  • Urinary tract infection

Book First Walk Free!

Why Urinating in His Crate Occurs in Dogs

When a dog is in his crate for a long period of time, he may need to urinate. Other reasons may include:

Improperly Trained

If your dog is improperly housebroken, he may not understand when to go to the bathroom and when to not go to the bathroom. It takes a lot of dedication, time, and patience to train a dog to go to the bathroom properly. If a dog doesn’t know what is expected, and is kept in a crate for a period of time, he may urinate.

Prolonged Time in Crate

If your dog is left in his crate for a long time, such as more than 5 hours or so, he may pee in it. Every dog is different, and some dogs can go without a toileting break for longer than others. However, if you are working dog parent, it is important to not leave your dog in a crate for the day, every day. Many responsible dog owners make arrangements for their dogs in order for them to have the opportunity to go to the bathroom during the day.

Anxiety

If you have an overly anxious dog, he may pee in his crate or in other places around the house. He may become nervous when you leave him in there, and may urinate due to stress or anxiety of being confined.

Overactive Bladder

Some dogs, typically older dogs, may be incontinent or have an overactive bladder. It is important to pay attention to your dog’s bathroom habits, and if he seems to have an overactive bladder then it is very important to take him outside frequently. Keeping him in a crate may cause him to go to the bathroom in the crate.  

Urinary Tract or Kidney Infection

If your dog has a urinary tract infection, he may feel the urge to pee more often than not. He may feel the urges to go to the bathroom, and may pee in various locations around the house. This includes his crate if he is left alone for a period of time. If your dog has stones or crystals in his bladder, this may also cause him to have the urge to pee.

What to do if your Dog is Urinating in His Crate

If your dog is peeing in his crate, and you feel he has not been in it very long, you may wish to contact your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will want to know information about your dog’s lifestyle and his environment, particularly his urination habits and how long he is in his crate. Once your veterinarian learns more about your dog, he may choose to do a few tests to check his kidneys and urine.

He may perform blood work, a urinalysis, and a biochemistry profile to get an overview of your dog’s health. Depending on the results of these tests, he will decide on the proper treatment plan.

If your dog has no health issues, your veterinarian may talk with you and give you advice on crate training. He may give you helpful tips on what to do before you put him in confinement and how often to take him outside to urinate. If your veterinarian feels you are keeping him in his crate for too many hours, he will let you know, and may advise you on getting someone to let him out in between that time period.

Prevention of Urinating in His Crate

There are ways to prevent your dog from peeing in his crate. The main thing you can do is to limit his time in the cage. It is important to be sure your companion pees outside before you put him in confinement, and to not leave him in there for more eight hours, if he is a healthy adult dog. Some professionals recommend no more than six hours. Also, it is important your dog gets an adequate amount of exercise before going into the crate.

Another way to help prevent your dog from peeing in the crate is to keep his regular check-ups and veterinary visits. This will allow you to be proactive in your dog’s overall health and catch any type of urinary tract infection early, if one should start.

Cost of Urinating in His Crate

For urinary tract infections in dogs, the price may be approximately $350. For crate training issues, and for hiring a behavioral therapist or trainer, the cost may be $350.

Urinating in His Crate Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Tino
Boxer
9 Weeks
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Peeing in crate

My 9 week old boxer pit bull mix has been housebroken and will run to my back door and cry when he needs to be taken outside. I take him out before he goes in his crate and usually he would cry to wake me up and go outside but now he will just pee inside his crate at night and cry afterwards. It’s like he doesn’t care that he’s soiling his “safe haven” he holds his pee longer during the night if I am sleeping with him but not while he is on his own.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations
Crate and house training are a process and not a one lesson training, you need to show disapproval at the urination and allow him plenty of time to do his business before bed and before you leave the home. You should also bring this up with your Veterinarian when you go in next for vaccinations to see if there is a medical reason (infection etc…) for the urinating in the crate. Unfortunately, I cannot give you any constructive advice on this at this time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Add a comment to Tino's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Omega
Husky
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Peeing in crate

I have a one year old male Husky. He has had an issue since day one with potty training, his other training was a breeze. He learned everything the same week I taught him, all except the potty issue. He will pee on himself, in his kennel, outside, 20 minutes after we bring him inside, overnight, anytime. I’ve had plenty of dogs and I’ve never had this problem! It’s infuriating because it’s either constantly mop the floors, putting puppy pads down that he will pee on then chew up, doing laundry everyday because he refuses to pee where he’s suppose to. I mean I just don’t get it! We have an eight year old chihuahua that is fully trained and you’d imagine would help him figure it out but it’s like he doesn’t understand! I haven’t tried the vet testing yet (we have an appointment in the morning) but I believe that will be a waste since he has been doing this since we got him at 8 weeks old. Please, any suggestions?

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
245 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. You're already taking care of the first step, which is having his blood and urine tested to make sure that he doesn't have an underlying problem. It is possible, even though it has been going on for so long, so that makes sense to rule that out. It is very difficult to housetrain a dog that will urinate in his kennel, I agree - it doesn't give you any space to trust. One thing that you might try, once he has had his veterinary appointment and has been deemed healthy, is to physically have him right at your side, constantly, for a period of 2-3 days. If he is right by you at all times, you'll see when he is starting to look like he has to urinate, and you can get him right outside before he urinates in the house. Praise praise praise when he urinates outside. Your veteirnarian may also have some suggestions, once they have examined him. I hope that you are able to get him over this!

Add a comment to Omega's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Wally
Boxer
2 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Urinating In crate
urinating while laying down
Urinating In House
no medical issues

Hello, I have a two year old Boxer mix who was peeing in his crate and in the house when we got him at 7 months. We believed he may have been at out door dog when he was with his previous owners, and we were able to house train him within a few months. We got another dog 3 months ago and at first he wasn't showing any issues. The dogs get along fine. He recently started urinating in the house, laying down and peeing, and peeing in his crate every time we leave him in it. We do sleep with the new door in the bed and she isn't in her crate as much because she was previously abused and not crate trained. I just went to the vet and they have ruled out any medical issues. What else can we do to stop the urinating in the crate, laying down and peeing without getting up, and randomly peeing in the house? He only gets one bowl of water per day and he's only in the crate at night or up to 4 hours per day while we work. Thanks!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations
These types of cases are behavioural and are a lot more difficult to treat or manage than medical problems, reinforcing crate training is required along with punishment for urination. I don’t have any specific advice since each case is different, but you should try to train Wally and if you still have issues consult with a Behaviourist. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Add a comment to Wally's experience

Was this experience helpful?

ramone
Chihuahua
12 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

anxiety

Medication Used

Enalapril

I have a 12 year old chihuahua that I've adopted and he will not stop peeing in his crate and in the house if left alone. His life before I took him in was very stressful and he was poorly being cared for. He knows to go outside and I take him out frequently besides when I am at work for the day. Roughly 6 hours. When I am at work I come home to pee in his crate and all over the floor and sometimes poop on his bed. I moved him to a smaller crate where he could stand up and lay down and he still would pee/poop in his crate possibly laying in it. Sometimes when he would only be in there for an hour or two so I moved him back to the bigger one. When I first took him home he peed in my bed a couple times but I caught him both times and he now knows not to do that. Every morning we wake up and I will take him outside, feed him and while hes eating I'll get ready for work. The other day I came downstairs and he had peed alll over the rug and on the floor which doesn't make sense because I just took him outside! So tonight, I left him out because maybe its an anxiety thing and he'll do better if he's out. I was gone for 2 hours and I came home and he had peed on the rug. I've tried diapers and he wont leave them on. I took him to the vet and she did blood work and didnt find a uti. I am just lost and need some advice.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations
This could just be a separation anxiety thing which may be understandable given his past and we can only guess what he may have been through. Most likely there is nothing medically wrong with Ramone but it is difficult to say without any certainty with more testing being done. If Ramone isn’t urinating when your at home we can chalk it up to behaviour which should improve over time. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

This story is similar to mine. I also adopted a older dog 2 months ago. A Maltese mix whose previous owner had Alzheimer's. He was going to be euthanized but the vet called the local SPCA.
The first day or two he peed on my carpet but hasn't since. He can make it through the night from 10:30 p.m. until 7 a.m. with no problem. He was peeing a lot on the pads I provided and I took him to the vet to see if he was diabetic or if he had a UTI...I gave him his full regimen of antibiotics for the UTI and all his blood work came back normal. I take him outfor a walk before I put him in his crate. But I can come back in les than an hour and he has peed in the crate. I'm hoping that this is just separation anxiety...because I don't know what else to do.

I am going through the same thing. What should I do? It seems behavioral with mine too and anxiety

Add a comment to ramone's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Kona
Mutt
5 Months
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

anxiety

Hello! I got a new dog from the pound about a month ago. She’s gotten very good about not peeing in the house so that is good. She also sleeps in her kennel in my room at night with the door closed and she does just fine, doesn’t cry or anything and makes it the whole night without peeing or crying. But any time I put her in the crate and leave she pees her crate. I’m sure this is a separation anxiety issue but I was wondering if there’s any way to train her not to pee her crate when I leave the room or if it just takes time. Thank you!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1808 Recommendations
This may be just a separation anxiety issue since she may be aware that you have left the home as opposed to being asleep, it may take her some time to learn that you will come back but apart from showing disapproval at the urination and continuing training there isn’t anything else that I would recommend doing. A month is a short period of time and you should give Kona time to adjust, but if there is still an issue by six months of age I would discuss it with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Add a comment to Kona's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Jack
Australian Cattle Lab Mix
3 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Peeing in crate

I have a 3 year old Australian cattle lab mix, he has been peeing in his crate lately. We make sure he goes potty before he is put in his crate. He isn't in there for long, 4-5 hrs at a time. Took him to the vet and blood work and stool sample came back fine. What else can we do?

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
245 Recommendations
Thank you for your question. Did they check a urine sample? If he has a bladder infection, that might make him urinate more frequently. If his bloodwork was normal, he isn't' having kidney problems or becomign a diabetic, it would be a good idea to check a urine sample.

Add a comment to Jack's experience

Was this experience helpful?

Bambi
Chorkie
9 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

UTI
anxiety

My dog has been potty trained and has been very good at it too. He knows to cry when he has to go and i’ll take him. At night i put him in the kennel and he cries to wake me up when he has to go. Lately he has been peeing in the kennel and idk what to do. I even left it open at night and put a pee pad down on the floor and he still qent inaide the kennel. I’ve washed his covers and everything to get rid of the smell. so i don’t understand why he is doing that.

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
245 Recommendations
Thank you for contacting us about Bambi. He may have a urinary tract infection or some other urianry abnormality - he should be examined by his veterinarian to make sure that he isn't having problems, and if he seems fine and his urine is normal, he may need to outside more frequently. It also helps to take him on walks vs letting him outside, as they tend to be more focussed on urinating when they are actually on walks.

Add a comment to Bambi's experience

Was this experience helpful?