Coronavirus Average Cost

From 359 quotes ranging from $200 - 3,000

Average Cost

$800

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What are Coronavirus?

Coronavirus is most often found in young cats or multi-cat households where it is spread through feces and airborne contaminants. Fatalities most often occur in cats who are young or have a weakened immune system.

Coronavirus in cats, or feline infectious peritonitis, is a viral disease caused by certain strains of feline coronavirus. Though most strains of feline coronavirus do not cause the disease to occur, some strains can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe. These strains may also mutate in the cat's body, becoming feline infectious peritonitis virus. This virus attacks the immune system and vital organs, resulting in the death of the cat.

Symptoms of Coronavirus in Cats

Symptoms of feline infectious peritonitis depend on the type of strain of coronavirus that the cat has contracted, the age of the cat, the cat's immune system and what specific organs are attacked by the virus. The virus can be one of two types, wet or dry, with symptoms depending on the type of feline infectious peritonitis the cat has contracted.

Wet/Effusive

  • Fever that doesn't respond to pain reliever or antibiotics
  • Weight loss
  • Anorexia (lack of appetite)
  • Lethargy
  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • Nasal discharge
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal distension (nonpainful abdominal swelling)
  • Breathing difficulties
  • Fluid in chest cavity
  • Granulomas that form on different organs of the body

Dry/Non-Effusive

  • Fever that doesn't respond to pain relievers or antibiotics
  • Poor growth (in young kittens)
  • Eye inflammation
  • Jaundice
  • Depression
  • Anemia
  • Diarrhea
  • Depression
  • Neurological symptoms, which include loss of sight, loss of balance or inability to properly run/walk due to loss of coordination

Causes of Coronavirus in Cats

Feline coronavirus is fairly common among cats and is transmitted through the feces of other infected cats or from breathing in contaminants. Feline infectious peritonitis is caused by the feces or airborne contaminants of certain strains of the coronavirus. Some types of feline coronaviruses can mutate and attack the white blood cells, which then carry the disease throughout the body. When this mutation occurs, it causes feline infectious peritonitis virus.

Diagnosis of Coronavirus in Cats

Feline infectious peritonitis is difficult to diagnose as there is no definitive test that can determine if a cat has a mild form of coronavirus or feline infectious peritonitis. The symptoms can also mimic other diseases or viruses, making it more difficult for veterinarians to diagnose properly.

The veterinarian will ask for the cat's health history, which includes the cat's symptoms, when symptoms first began, and if the cat lives with other cats at home or was frequently placed in a kennel. The veterinarian will examine the cat, listening to the cat's breathing and looking for a distended abdomen. 

Labs, which include a complete blood count and an ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test, will need to be done. The complete blood count will look for white blood cells that are indicative of an infection while an ELISA test will show the presence of any coronavirus antibodies. A sample of fluid may be taken from the thorax or abdomen for further testing. Additionally, a fecal test using a stool sample may also be performed to detect the virus. Because these tests only show if the coronavirus is present and not if it's mutated, however, the veterinarian will diagnose the cat with feline infectious peritonitis if it doesn't have the symptoms of other viruses or diseases.

Treatment of Coronavirus in Cats

Most strains of coronavirus don't require treatment as the cat's immune system will produce antibodies against the virus. Unfortunately, there is no cure if the cat has developed feline infectious peritonitis. Care is centered on keeping the cat comfortable and prolonging its life for a few months. 

If the cat is diagnosed with the non-effusive type of feline infectious peritonitis, medications will be prescribed. Antibiotics will help kill bacteria, immunosuppressants will prevent the virus from mutating, and anti-inflammatory medications will reduce the pain the cat is experiencing and reduce inflammation throughout the body.

Recovery of Coronavirus in Cats

Feline infectious peritonitis is fatal in approximately 95 percent of cases. In some cases, the prescribed medications can keep the infection dormant, or in remission, for several months. It's important to follow up with the veterinarian so medications can be evaluated for effectiveness and changed, if needed, in order to allow the cat to be comfortable.

Though there is a vaccine available to prevent feline infectious peritonitis, its use is not recommended by the American Association of Feline Practitioners as it hasn't proven effective in preventing the virus in all cases. 

The best way to keep coronavirus from spreading to other cats is to vigilantly clean the cat's food and water dishes, regularly disinfect the cat's living space and keep sick cats away from other cats in multi-cat households. Kittens should be kept away from other cats, other than the mother, to prevent them from contracting the virus.

Coronavirus Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Nala
Mixed breed
11 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss

Hi
My cat was diagnosed with corona virus about a month ago. She has thrown up a couple times does that mean she is coming to an end
Thank you
Kim
Long Beach CA

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus is not an unusual finding and may not be a serious infection for a cat unless the cat is showing signs of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP); I cannot say whether or not Nala’s symptoms are serious and would recommend you visit your Veterinarian for an examination if the vomiting continues. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Luna (cat with coronavirus), Orion (cat who lives with Luna)
tabby
1 Year
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Abdominal swelling
Vomiting
Lethargy
Lack of energy

Hello! I live with my sister, and one of her two cats has tested positive for the coronavirus and is currently on antibiotics. When leaving my residence and traveling to another home with cats, is there anything I can do to prevent transmitting it to them? I am deeply concerned since I visit my mother often and she has a household with an elderly cat and two kittens. It would break my heart if anything happened to them because of my spreading this terrible virus!!! The cat who has the coronavirus has had days where she’s been vomiting, lethargic, with a swollen belly and days where she is completely fine. I’m concerned that this cat may actually have FIP. Also, since the household with the infected cat also has another cat inside, is there anything we can do to prevent them from catching the virus? Should this other cat be on preventative antibiotics?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus is very misunderstood by cat owners; coronavirus is a virus (it is in the name), antibiotics are ineffective against it as they are for treating bacterial infections; many cats are seropositive for coronavirus and rates may reach 80% or more in some settings (shelters, catteries, breeders etc…). Only a small portion of cats develop the mutated version of the virus which presents as Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP), if you suspect that Luna has FIP you should have this confirmed by a Veterinarian. Any cats with ‘regular’ coronavirus should be isolated from seronegative cats and retested until they are seronegative too; there is some information on the link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/digestive-system/diseases-of-the-stomach-and-intestines-in-small-animals/feline-enteric-coronavirus www.msdvetmanual.com/generalized-conditions/feline-infectious-peritonitis/overview-of-feline-infectious-peritonitis

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bobo
good
One Year
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

thanks for this information, my cat of age one year and tow monthes was diagnosed by coronavirus but my cat eat well drink well tow, and have white worms in itis feces, with swollen abdomin .idoesent notice any symptoms except the abdominal swolling, also im not sure that my cat make urine ,could i gave my kitty nedazole antibiotics witout harming my cat. please tell me what to do thanks

Read more at: https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/coronavirus

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
471 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Intestinal coronavirus is a very common finding in cats, and doesn't typically cause disease unless it mutates to FIP virus. If your cat has been diagnosed with FIP, the prognosis is very guarded for Bobo. If he has been diagnosed with coronavirus, the prognosis is better and his signs may be unrelated. Since he has a swollen belly and you are not sure if he is urinating, it would be best to have him seen by your veteirinarian, as they can examine him, evaluate his health status, and prescribe any medications that might be appropriate. I hope that he is okay.

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Ziggy
mixed shorthair
13 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

anasocira

I got an 8 year old rescue, who had been 'surrendered by owner', 5 years ago. He has been big, healthy and vigorously communicative, outgoing and pushy. Overnight, his left pupil dilated, he become withdrawn, extra thirsty, not as hungry and very quiet. Vet said after many tests, he has corona virus and has developed antibodies. They said there was no plan for his treatment except to manage symptoms. I read on Pet MD an experimental treatment: https://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2016/april/new-drug-may-mean-fip-no-longer-death-sentence-cats-34010.
Where and how can I get this for my cat?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
The treatment mentioned in the article is known as a antiviral protease inhibitor and is currently a scientific theory, not an available treatment to the market. Coronavirus doesn’t mean specifically that a cat has feline infectious peritonitis as only a small number of cats with coronavirus become affected. You should discuss this more with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Baloo
Abyssinian
8 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Sneezing

Can an 8 year old, indoor only, healthy cat develop full-blown corona-virus from an infection it caught as a kitten --- 8 full years before? Can this virus be chronic,maybe with mild symptoms, or completely dormant inside a cat for 8+ years before suddenly showing up with severe symptoms? We have another cat, but he's 4 years older, was an only cat until the second cat moved in 8 years ago. Thx!

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
471 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Most cats carry corona virus in their systems as kittens. I'm not sure if you are referring to an upper respiratory infection that your cat may be showing signs from, but if so, many cats will have episodic signs of upper respiratory disease from stress in their environment or a low immune system, and the virus can cause signs until it is fought back down by the cat's immune system and things return to normal. Without more details on what is happening with Baloo, I hope that answered your question?

Yes, I think I understand. Cats can catch the virus as kittens, and it can surface many years later. This kitty had no recent exposure that I could think of, with the exception of vet check up and vaccines. He developed one of the strains of the corona virus, recovered, but developed and died from fip a year later. I'm not sure if those two incidents are related; he was only ever sick once, with the upper respiratory thing. My vet is very good, but I have a worry the cat could have been infected during a check up visit (no boarding involved), and would rather go someplace else for our other cat. I'm not really convinced that it's possible to catch via brief contacts, but want to make an informed, responsible decision about where we go for care. Thanks so much for your thoughts. I feel like a dummy.

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Cleo
Bengal
6 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

I had 2 kittens. One just died from FIP. So I figure it’s like 100% likely the other has coronavirus (not Fip)...

My questions are1) with deep and frequent cleaning and disinfecting ect for several months can one actually completely get rid of the virus in the home and the surviving kitten?

2) I plan to introduce a new cat in 6 months or so, and I want to make sure my current cat no longer is infected! I plan to get her tested in a couple months to see that the infection is gone. And I plan to get the new cat tested before bringing him home to make sure he also is negative. If both cats living in the home are negative. Does that mean that the house is coronavirus free and neither will get it again?

3) Or can it be reintroduced randomly (ie. on shoes/cloths worn at other people’s homes ect)

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
471 Recommendations
Thank you for contacting us about Cleo. I'm sorry for the loss of your kitten. Coronavirus exists in nearly every cat in the world, and only becomes a problem when it mutates to the FIP virus. The test for Coronavirus is not a particularly helpful test, as it doesn't tell us anything about FIP. The majority of cats carry corona with no problems, and it is partially due to genetics whether the virus will mutate. You can't get rid of the corona virus in the environment, as cats are rarely corona virus free- it doesn't typically cause a problem as long as the house is stress free and not over crowded. If you have any further questions, it would be best to ask your veterinarian, as they have seen your cats and know their specific situation. I hope that everything goes well with your kitten.

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Mischeif
Persian
5 months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My kitten has had diaherria for 3 weeks. My 4 year old cat has had it for nearly 3 weeks. My 11 year old now had it. Finally, doing a diaherria panel on all three (after several negative fecals), they found the kitten has corona virus, but the others are negative still. My question is, given 90% of cats have corona virus, and all of my cats are persians from breeders, so most likely all have it, could the kitten somehow "activate" in the other cats? Also it is getting worse instead of better. How long will it last? Is it possible that they also have something else like coccidia that didn't show up, or would all other parasites/bacteria that cause diaherria show up on diaherra panels or in fecal exams?

Also, my vet told me to give probiotics, but within 5 minutes of giving them, the kitten vomits. Can the probiotics cause vomiting?

Now they are not on medications, but they were on metraconidzale for two weeks and that helped some. Now that they are off of it, the diaherra is getting worse.

They were also on itraconazole because the kitten brought ringworm. But they are all off now because they had bad side effects, including vomiting.

THANKS

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus sounds scary, but most of the time cats will recover and show minimal signs; a coronavirus test wouldn’t show up parasites so a faecal test would be required in order to determine whether there were protozoa or worms present, monthly anthelmintics should be given regardless as part of your prevention program along with topical spot on products. If they still have ringworm, topical ointments may help and trimming the hair around the lesions would make application easier. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

thanks for this information, my cat of age one year and tow monthes was diagnosed by coronavirus but my cat eat well drink well tow, and have white worms in itis feces, with swollen abdomin .idoesent notice any symptoms except the abdominal swolling, also im not sure that my cat make urine ,could i gave my kitty nedazole antibiotics witout harming my cat. please tell me what to do
thanks

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Mischief
Persian
4 months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

Three weeks ago I got a persian kitten from a breeder. He developed diaherria and then my four year old persian got diaherria too. All fecals were negative. Then my 11 year old persian got diaherria as well. Diaherra panels on all cats show the kitten is positive for corona virus and the other two were negative at the time of testing. All have diaherria and there has been some vomiting (although that was after I started them on probiotics at my vet's suggestion).
Should I get rid of the kitten? I don't want to risk my other two beloved cats. They are all symptomic with diaherria. Please advise. THANKd

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus is not uncommon in cats from breeders and catteries; symptoms are usually mild diarrhoea but most cats are asymptomatic. Only mutated strains of coronavirus may develop into feline infectious peritonitis; you should continue to test your cats, but it is your decision whether or not you keep the kitten but there is no reason why you shouldn’t. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.cats.org.uk/uploads/documents/cat-care-leaflets-2013/VG10_Feline_Coronavirus_(FCoV)_and_Feline_Infectious_Peritonitis_(FIP).pdf

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Beloved cats
no breed
4-6 years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No current symptoms

Hello! I am in desperate need of your advice. We had 6 cats, the last one was adopted from a shelter 4 months ago and died yesterday from FIP (at least we've got such a diagnoses - his blood was corona-positive with high titres, he refused from food, high fever that we coudn't stop for 2 weeks, and finally he's got lever inflamation and liquid in his belly, the antibiotics didn't help him - we changed them twice). The question is that we have 5 more cats, not showing symptoms, but we are afraid that they are coronavirus-positive as well. Can we conduct some kind of preventive treatment for them to suppress the "amount" of virus in them and to prevent it from developing into FIP? I don't want to lose them all, we love them all so much. I would be very gratefull for you advice. Thank you!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
You need to dissociate feline infectious peritonitis and coronavirus; the majority of cats from shelters and catteries will be coronavirus positive but that is no indicator of FIP, FIP is a mutation of the strain of coronavirus and if you test your cats there is a high likelihood that they have coronavirus but doesn’t mean they will get FIP. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ruby
tabby
7 Months
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Hi. I have two cats and i have adopted one more two months ago.New one had corona and she used interferon. We had 3 blood work. First was talen after we adopted her. 2. One after using interferon. There was improvement on the second one. 3.one is exactly same with the second one. Our veternerian says you have 2 options. First one is you can keep all the cats together, but its risky. Or you give the new cat away. I dont want to give her away. But i am terrified that my other cats will catch corona virus. What should i do? I dont want to loose them all. Give me a good advise please.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus itself is not dangerous per se but a mutated form of the virus may cause feline infectious peritonitis (FIP); in reality up to 90% of cats in some shelters, catteries or even households may show a positive antibody titre but it doesn’t indicate infection. Your Veterinarian is right, either mix them together or keep them separate until the new cat tests zero on the antibody titre. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lola
Ragdoll
12 months
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

My cat tested positive for coronavirus,titre 640 after my previous cat died of fip in september. How long should it take for the virus to go to 0 titre? And how long should I wait till I do another blood test after the last one?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
A coronavirus antibody titre isn’t indicative of FIP (feline infectious peritonitis) and many cats will test positive to coronavirus which only indicates exposure to the virus but may not be suggestive of a current infection or susceptibility to FIP. Generally, we would test cats every three months until we get a zero antibody titre test; but this is only done if you are looking to enter certain breeding programs or catteries. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you.

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Porridge
dsh
18 Months
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

I have just taken on a new stray cat. She is over 18 months old, spayed and appears healthy.

I took her for a health check prior to integrating her with my other cats. She had a faint line against FoCV. A further blood test was done for FIP but was not conclusive.

She has normal poop, no fever and no symptoms. As a result of the test I was advised not to let her mix at all with my other cats and to consider not keeping her.

I don't want to put my cats at risk but I have no ideas if they may already have FoCV - they were all rescues and go to a cattery occasionally.

The new cat with FoCV doesn't like being left on her own, so I feel a bit stuck. What is the best course of action in this case? What are the realistic risks to my other cats?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus is not an unusual finding in a healthy cat and detecting coronavirus doesn’t always mean a diagnosis of FIP; whilst measures should be taken, based on the information provided it doesn’t seem like there is a risk but you should discuss this with your Veterinarian and possibly retest to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thanks - that's very helpful

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cindy
Selkirk Rex
6 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss diarrhea bad smell
Weight Loss diarrhea
Weight Loss

Medication Used

predislone

my cat has had diahrhea on and off for 4 years solidd for nearly a year vet did poop sample an she tested positive for coronavirus an crostisum she had antibitics kgel mydirhrha
now on twice a day steroids but nothing stops the poops
she stinks sooo bad purrs all day lost weight but remained same weight last 3 months she is petite pedigree indoor cat selkirm rex i breed them i have 18 others
my vet is worried they all have it only cindy with symtpoms i cant afford to get them tested only cindy with loose poops she licks it up she in the ltter tray all day long
what can i do? as we have exhausted all options she drips poop everywhere! vet wants me to considder putting her down as could be at risk to my other cats

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
There are a few possible causes for the diarrhoea which you are describing which may include infections, parasites (protozoa), colitis, food allergies among other issues; also many cats test positive for coronavirus without showing any symptoms. Further testing and possibly consultation with a Specialist would be need to help narrow down to a specific cause and diagnosis; I’m not sure if euthanasia is required, but I would check the faeces for parasites if not done already and an x-ray may be of value. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Madeline
tabby
9 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

High FeCoV titre
Random oedema in limbs, face, chin

Medication Used

Furosemide

Our kitten (9 months) recently started having random oedemas in her legs, feet, chin, etc (the same area has never come up twice, cause her no pain, she has a great appetite, lovely coat and seems unbothered by the swellings) which our vet gave us furosemide for - alongside various viral tests, bloods, x-rays,etc. The diuretic takes down any swelling within 24 hours each time, and we can go 4-5 days without any swellings at all (and these periods are getting longer). The swellings have been happening for about 3 weeks.

Results are now back and the key one to mention is the positive FeCoV titre result of 10,000+. FIV, FELV were negative. As mentioned, no symptoms alongside the random swellings. Having done quite a lot of reading, I see that “nephrotic syndrome” can be a secondary caused by a FeCoV infection. Vet said bloods and urine analysis were reasonably normal - total proteins are very slightly low, urea very slightly high, albumin a touch low. Alb:Glob ratio = 1.15.

Can a FeCoV infection cause this type of immune system weirdness, and should it burn itself out - or should we look at something like the renal symptoms of nephrotic syndrome?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
We would expect a cat with nephrotic syndrome secondary to coronavirus infection to present with other symptoms, noticeably irregular kidneys which your Veterinarian would be able to palpate during an examination. Urinalysis for protein detection will show if the kidneys are leaking any protein from them which may explain slightly low albumin levels; the edema may be associated with nephritis but would require further investigation and may not be associated with coronavirus but may be familial. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Holly
Siamese
10 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

No current symptoms

my neighbor and I got 3 cats from the same cattery. She got 2, one from 2 different litters living in the same house. One kitten was the runt and they recently found he has coronavirus in his stool. He is quite ill and they are monitoring him for if the virus has possibly mutated into FIP. (Although he was originally FIP negative)

My kitten was from a different litter but same house, and currently healthy. My question is, is it likely my cat has coronavirus but it is dormant? If she has dormant coronavirus, do we need to avoid getting another kitten? We were looking to adopt a second cat but would not want to put another at risk. Thanks

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations
Coronavirus is more common than people realise with some catteries and shelters having a seroprevalence of up to 90% of cats; but less than 5% of cats with coronavirus will develop FIP (feline infectious peritonitis). I would let this stop you from adopting another cat and there are many cats (and other pets) in need of loving homes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/generalized-conditions/feline-infectious-peritonitis/overview-of-feline-infectious-peritonitis

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Geralt
Tabby
8 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Fluid in Abdomen

Medication Used

Metronidazole

My cat came up positive in a abdominal fluid test for FIP but is not showing any symptoms. He does have fluid in his belly but that is it. He eats, drinks, solid stool, after taking antibiotics his fever has stopped for days now and is active as can be. My doctor insists that it is FIP but we are convinced other wise. We want to know a different opinion

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1967 Recommendations

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP caused by coronavirus) is a difficult diagnosis to make and is usually a diagnosis of exclusion; the presence of coronavirus on a diagnostic test cannot differentiate between a non-virulent strain compared to a virulent strain, therefore symptoms are checked and a differential diagnosis is done to determine other possible causes of the symptoms and are tested individually, once all the conditions on the differential diagnosis comes back as negative, a presumptive diagnosis of exclusion is made of FIP. The main symptoms of effusive (wet) FIP are distended abdomen due to fluid, breathing difficulties, loss of appetite and depression (not all symptoms may show). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I am curious to know if the cat mentioned above is making a recovery or otherwise. Our cat has been diagnosed with coronavirus but still has a very good apetite - however he has lost weight somehow and is not so happy and playful. He is now showing a fuller belly with possibly liquid building up inside but eats so much it's odd... This is hard to accept there is no cure and we wonder if he's in pain or what will happen next before making the hard decision to let him go...

Uno - Cat - 10 yrs old just got a diag of the same... The person taking care of him let the litter boxes fill so HIGH that he started peeing, on the floor - I was not hired 2 take care of him as I have in the past where I cleaned the 4 cat litter boxes EVERY day. Guess $300 was 2 much 2 pay 4 16 days while the owner was gone - I DID sneak over & saw how the boxes were NOT cleaned... I said - SELF - he did not hire me so Y should I do that... I should have cuz I love his cat & the cat absolutely loves me....loves me When I drive in the driveway - no comes 2 me & PURRS & PURRS cuz his owner neglecks him a LOT! He should NOT have him & I guess he won't in a month or so! & NOW he's going 2 DIE... I'm SO awfwul SAD

Hi there my two year old Persian tested positive for coroner virus he constantly has diarohea but otherwise he is well is there anything I can do to calm the diarohea down it's like dark watery consistency

Hi there my cat has tested positive for coroner virus he's well apart from chronic diarohea of a dark brown colour has anyone idea how to calm the diarohea

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