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What are Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus?

Proctitis could be caused by food allergies, internal parasites, infections, or an intestinal blockage. This condition is treatable, but because it is painful for your cat, it’s important to take him to a vet right away to make him more comfortable and treat the underlying cause of the condition.

The rectum and anus are both parts of the large intestine. The anus is the actual opening where feces is passed through, and the rectum connects the anus to the colon. If either the rectum or anus are inflamed, the condition is referred to as proctitis. If your cat has proctitis, you will probably notice him straining to defecate, or crying in pain while doing so. When feces does pass, it may be smaller than usual and could contain fresh, red blood. You may notice that the tissue appears swollen and bright red.

Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus Average Cost

From 541 quotes ranging from $100 - $500

Average Cost

$250

Symptoms of Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

Proctitis, or inflammation of the rectum and anus, can cause your cat a great deal of discomfort that is especially noticeable when he tries to defecate. Some of the symptoms you should keep an eye out for include:

  • Straining to defecate
  • Fresh blood in feces
  • Excessive licking of the back end
  • Scooting his bottom across the floor
  • Difficulty defecating
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Causes of Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

There are a number of different factors that can cause a cat’s rectum and anus to become inflamed. Some of the most common causes include:

  • Food allergy
  • Tumors or polyps in the rectum
  • Inflammatory disease
  • Colon inflammation, also known as colitis
  • Parasites in the intestines, including tapeworms, whipworms and protozoa
  • Presence of a foreign object
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Diagnosis of Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

If you spot any of the symptoms of proctitis, take your cat to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Talk to the vet about the symptoms you have observed and when they began. You should also provide the vet with a thorough medical history for your cat, and let the vet know if you have recently made any changes to your pet’s diet. If your cat lives outdoors, make sure you mention this to the vet as certain allergens could cause inflammation if ingested.

The vet will begin by performing a digital rectal examination, which will help assess the condition of the anal gland, and the quality of the stool in the intestines. The vet may also perform complete a blood count, urinalysis, and fecal flotation tests, which will help the vet eliminate possible causes of the symptoms. A stool sample may also be examined to check for the presence of parasites. 

If nothing turns up on these tests, the vet may perform an ultrasound or X-ray to assess the digestive system and to check for foreign objects that could be obstructing and irritating the cat’s rectum or anus.

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Treatment of Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

Treatment will need to first focus on alleviating the discomfort, and then on treating the underlying cause of the symptoms. If the anus is inflamed, the vet may gently clean the area and apply a topical ointment to soothe the skin and reduce inflammation. If the cat has been licking, an Elizabethan collar will be provided.

If the underlying cause is a parasite or infection, the vet will prescribe medication that you must administer at home on a regular basis. Oral anti-inflammatory medication is usually prescribed even if the cause is not an inflammatory disease. This medication can help reduce the swelling in the rectum and anus and make your cat more comfortable. 

In some cases, the inflammation is caused by a foreign object or tumor inside the cat’s body. If this is the case with your cat, it is likely that the vet will perform emergency surgery to remove the foreign object or mass. 

While the underlying cause is being treated, the vet may recommend feeding your cat stool softeners or fiber supplements. Stool softeners will soften the feces and make it easier for your cat to defecate without pain. Fiber supplements will firm up loose stool, resulting in less straining in those with diarrhoea.

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Recovery of Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

You will need to closely follow the vet’s instructions when it comes to administering medication to ensure your cat recovers well. If you miss even one dose of an antibiotic treatment, for example, the bacteria could become resistant to the medication, making it less effective.

If your cat has been licking the area, the vet may recommend putting an Elizabethan collar on him to stop this behavior. 

To combat any diarrhea, the vet will most likely ask you to change your cat’s diet to include more fiber and easily digestible foods. Make sure you have this conversation with your vet prior to leaving the office, and follow his instructions closely. Monitor your cat as he heals and take him back to the vet if the symptoms are still present after treatment is over.

As long as your cat receives treatment in a timely manner,  rectal and anal inflammation is generally easily treatable by veterinarians.

Inflammation in the rectus and anus can be expensive to treat. If you suspect your cat has inflammation in the rectus and anus or is at risk, start searching for pet insurance today. Brought to you by Pet Insurer, Wag! Wellness lets pet parents compare insurance plans from leading companies like PetPlan and Trupanion. Find the “pawfect” plan for your pet in just a few clicks!

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Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus Average Cost

From 541 quotes ranging from $100 - $500

Average Cost

$250

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Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Domestic Short Hair/Tabby

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9 weeks

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Unknown severity

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34 found helpful

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Inflamed Anus And Issues With Stool.

My wife and I recently rescued a kitten and she has some redness and swelling around her anus/rectum. She's generally active as a kitten would be, uses the box, and was apparently given soft foods mostly. Her stool is of a semi hard consistency and "curls" She is very sensitive to touch near that area but overall shows no other signs of discomfort anywhere else, including the abdomen as well as there seems to be no bloating. What could we do to help until we can get her seen? We also have an older cat (~12 years old, Creamsicle Tabby, neutered, chronic sinus issues, spondylitis)

Oct. 2, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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34 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. The most common cause for rectal irritation in kittens is parasites and stool consistency. The best thing to do initially would be to have her dewormed. Taking a fecal sample to a veterinarian will allow them to look at the stool sample under a microscope and check for parasite eggs, and treat for what they see. I hope that all goes well for the kitten!

Oct. 2, 2020

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Burmese

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Six Years

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Unknown severity

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14 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Excessive Licking Of Anal Area And Minor Diarrhea

Hello so our 6 year old female cat has started to lick her anal areas followed by diarrhea in then which she streaks across the floor. She has improved the past few days but now is at it again. We are wondering what could be the issue

Sept. 29, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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14 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. There are many causes for diarrhea, including parasites, GI upset, intestinal infections, infectious diseases, or foreign bodies. If she seems to be acting normally otherwise, you may want to try feeding her a bland diet of boiled white chicken and boiled white rice for a day or two, and see if that helps. If the diarrhea and the licking continues, then it probably would be a good idea to have her seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine her and see what's going on. I hope that all goes well for her.

Sept. 29, 2020

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Inflammation of the Rectum and Anus Average Cost

From 541 quotes ranging from $100 - $500

Average Cost

$250

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