Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus Average Cost

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Average Cost

$600

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What are Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus?

Young kittens are the most at risk of developing a protruding rectum. Kittens under six months are more susceptible to parasites, which can cause straining during defecation. Older cats may also develop rectal prolapse when suffering from injuries or rectal tumors. Chronic irritation of the rectum can weaken its state in the body. Intense straining in general can push the rectal tissue out of the body. If this happens, it is important to keep the tissue moist and immediately bring the cat to a veterinarian for treatment. 

In rare circumstances, a cat’s rectal tissue may protrude out of the anal opening. This is referred to as a “rectal prolapse”. The rectum is the end piece of the large intestine. Noticing tubular tissue coming out of your cat’s anus is a visual cue that the rectum has partially exited the body. Swelling and severe pain are common with this condition. The cat will not likely be able to pass stool, which can lead to death in a matter of days.

Symptoms of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

While certain primary issues may lead to rectal prolapse, most symptoms of the prolapse itself are external and visible from the anus of the cat. Symptoms are as follows:

  • Tube-like tissue outside the anus
  • Bright red anus
  • Straining
  • Severe constipation
  • Swollen anus
  • Excessive anal licking
  • Depression
  • Lethargy
  • Long capillary refill time

Causes of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

Many different underlying issues can cause rectal prolapse in cats. Identifying the main problem can help in preventing prolapse from happening a second time after treatment. All known causes are below.

  • Gastrointestinal parasites
  • Dystocia (pushing while delivering kittens)
  • Cancerous or benign tumors in the rectum
  • Injury to the rectal lining
  • Genetic predisposition (as seen in the Manx cat breed)
  • Hernia
  • Ingestion of a non-food item
  • Constipation
  • Gastroenteritis from bacterial or viral infections
  • Urethral calculus (urinary stones in the urethra)

Diagnosis of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

After you bring your cat into a veterinary clinic or animal hospital, the veterinarian will need to perform a complete physical examination. This will include visual confirmation of the symptoms present followed by a rectal exam. To differentiate rectal prolapse from an even more severe condition called intussusception (small intestine prolapse), a lubricated probe will be inserted into the cat's anus. If the probe enters with little to no resistance, intussusception is likely and emergency surgery is required. If the probe does not enter easily, rectal prolapse is most likely present. The cat will need to be sedated for the duration of this examination.

The underlying cause of the rectal prolapse needs to be identified to choose the proper form of treatment. A fecal analysis may prove useful in identifying any parasites that are present in the cat. Blood work, including a complete blood count to see if hemoglobin is decreasing, and a chemical panel for overall health assessment may be necessary. Urinalysis can also help diagnose certain issues that cause rectal prolapse. X-rays can be used to see the extent of internal damage to the rectum. 

Treatment of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

The earlier a cat is brought in to be treated for rectal prolapse, the better chance for a successful recovery. Treatment has to be administered quickly to keep as much rectal tissue alive as possible. All treatments require general anesthesia and pain killers for the recovery period. 

Manual Resetting 

If most of the rectal tissue is alive, the veterinarian may be able to manually push it back into place. Sutures are then placed around the anus to keep the rectum in the body. Sutures need to be loose enough to allow bowel movements to pass. Sutures can be removed after 48 hours. 

Colopexy 

This is a mildly invasive surgery with an initial incision about the size of a spay incision. The rectum is pulled back into the body and secured to the body wall. 

Rectal Resection 

This surgery is used if rectal tissue has died and needs to be removed. Once dead tissue is amputated, the rectum is connected back to the anus. This is a very complicated surgery that is used as a last resort attempt to save the cat’s life. Complications are common.

Deworming Medication 

If parasites have been found in the cat, a full deworming is necessary to help the cat from having more rectal issues.

Antibiotics 

If bacterial infection has been identified as an underlying cause, antibiotics can be prescribed to eliminate the harmful bacteria from the body. Prescriptions generally last from two to four weeks.

Recovery of Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus in Cats

If the underlying cause of a rectal prolapse has been identified and treated and the rectum has been successfully returned to its proper place, the cat can make a full recovery. If a colopexy or manual resetting have taken place, recurrence is possible. If rectal resection surgery has been performed, serious infections can develop through the healing process and permanent incontinence is a possible outcome. 

If any incision has been made, take proper care in monitoring the surgery site for swelling, pus, bleeding or any other signs of infection. Apply an Elizabethan collar to stop the cat from licking its incision. Stool softeners are often required and are sometimes paired with an anal gel to assist the cat in passing bowel movements and help reduce pain. 

Deworm your cat on a regular schedule to help prevent a parasitic infestation from occurring in the first place. Fecal exams can also help diagnose parasites at early stages. Your veterinarian may recommend that you give your cat a diet high in fiber. Lots of fresh water should also be available to your cat. These provisions can help prevent constipation from occurring.

Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Tail less
Manx
8 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Distended abdomen

My 8 week old male kitten has a distended hard abdomen and his anus is sealed shut. None of the adult cars will lick his butt I rack him. It seems they've given up on him

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1711 Recommendations
There are various ways to get a kitten to defecate, but in young kittens it may be a case that their anus is sealed closed which is a congenital anomaly called atresia ani where surgery or euthanasia are the two options. If wiping around the anus with a damp warm cloth doesn’t work, you should visit a Veterinarian for an examination immediately as this is a medical emergency if it is atresia ani. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/surgery-stat-diagnosis-and-surgical-management-atresia-ani-small-animals

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Chewy
Egyptian Mau
3 Months
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Redness

My kittens buthole is slightly starting to protrude and I don't have the money to bring him to a vet, is it possible for me to to anything at home, possibly push it back in or something?

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1711 Recommendations
It would be best to try to soften Chewy’s stool so that there is less straining during defecation which may help in the short to medium term; plain canned pumpkin and canned tuna with some oil (no other additives) may help lubricate the stool for easy passage. Ideally though a visit to your Veterinarian would be best and they may decide to place some sutures around the anus or take a wait and see approach. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Poche
Korat
7 Weeks
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Um hi my cat has a large cut opened wide from the side of the anus and i dont know rhar to do am verry concerned i gave him advil and i put hydrogen peroxide plz help!

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1711 Recommendations
Advil (ibuprofen) is highly toxic to cats and shouldn’t be used as it causes kidney failure, you should visit your Veterinarian immediately to check Poche over; also hydrogen peroxide can slow the healing of wounds by damaging capillaries. Please take Poche in immediately to your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/ibuprofen/

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Able
American Bobtail
9 Months
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Protrusion

My male cat I think he's in-between 6 months and a year old he showed up at my house 3 w|is ago nothing but skin and bones but we connected so I started taking care of him I finally got him looking healthy but now he has a lump on his anus I saw for the past 3 days just a nugget of fecies one even on his the rocking chair with a coushion that he sits on I thought it was odd since he never went potty on the porch before I don't know what to do but I really love him so I don't want this to become life threatening unfortunately I don't have the money for any type of surgery if needed

Health Expert
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1711 Recommendations
A lump on or around the anus may be caused by a few different issues including anal sac disorders, perineal hernia, tumours to name a few possible issues. Without an examination it is difficult to determine exactly what the cause of this faecal incontinence is; from a treatment point of view, just make sure that Able isn’t struggling or straining to defecate, if so add some fiber into his diet. I’ve provided two links below for charities with links which assist people who cannot afford veterinary care so you can at least get him seen to determine the cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.aapaw.org/resources/vet-assistance-programs.html www.aaha.org/pet_owner/lifestyle/cant-afford-critical-veterinary-care-many-nonprofits-can-help!.aspx

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